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Old 09-10-2013, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ
1,280 posts, read 1,638,100 times
Reputation: 1618

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
Public land doesnt require money to upkeep it.
Wow. There's no use even trying to argue with that piece of total incorrectness.
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Old 09-10-2013, 04:50 PM
 
3,029 posts, read 6,909,639 times
Reputation: 3190
Quote:
Originally Posted by rah62 View Post
Wow. There's no use even trying to argue with that piece of total incorrectness.
I think a more accurate statement would be that MOST public land does not require money to keep it up. Maybe you should enlighten us to the "incorrectness" of his statement.
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Old 09-10-2013, 08:40 PM
 
7,283 posts, read 8,116,246 times
Reputation: 5371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ETex2 View Post
I think a more accurate statement would be that MOST public land does not require money to keep it up. Maybe you should enlighten us to the "incorrectness" of his statement.
Police, fire, range and animal management, liability, plus someone has to pick up the trash that most morons leave etc.
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Old 09-11-2013, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Forney Texas
2,119 posts, read 5,487,653 times
Reputation: 1168
Found an interesting article as to why Texas doesnt have public land.

Why Texas has no

In 1862 West Virginia seceded from the Confederate state of Virginia and petitioned the United States for admission to the Union as a state. It was accepted.
The other is Texas. Texas is the only state to join the United States by treaty. As an independent republic for 10 years, Texas owned all land within its borders not previously granted or sold-and that was about ⅔ of the present state. Texas also had a treaty-legal - though unenforceable - claim to about of New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle, a little piece of the southwest corner of Kansas, nearly all of Colorado east of the Rockies and part of the Rockies themselves, and the area around Cheyenne, Wyoming.
Following the Mexican War, in exchange for ceding its claims to the lands in present New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming to the United States, Texas retained ownership of all unassigned land within the current borders of the state. Those lands were gradually sold or traded off.
In the 1880s the state deeded some 3,000,000 acres on the west edge of the panhandle to an out-of-state syndicate in exchange for building the current state capitol building in Austin. Those lands became the famous XIT ranch. Although the lands covered all or parts of 10 counties, the XIT brand was not chosen to symbolize "Ten in Texas," as the legend holds it was.
According to historian J. Evetts Haley, author of "The XIT Ranch of Texas," the brand was chosen because it could be burned with five touches of a running iron - X, XI, XII, XIT.
Much of the land was set aside to be sold to build and support a public university system in the state.
Texas wisely retained half the mineral rights on the "school land," and when oil was discovered on it the
University of Texas system became the richest state university system in the country.
By the mid-1920s nearly all the state-owned public land in Texas had been sold. Texas' first national park, Big Bend, had to be purchased from private owners.
For the record, Big Bend was supposed to be an international peace park like one on the Canadian border, but Mexico has never attempted to purchase and set aside the land intended for the park on its side of the Rio Grande.
Texas' second national park, Guadalupe Mountains, on the New Mexico line about halfway between the panhandle and El Paso, was a private ranch that was deeded to the nation as a park.
What is now Padre Island National Seashore was so tied up in ownership disputes - my own family had a claim, having ranched on Padre for a brief period during the 1870s - that the only way to settle the disputes was to bring the place under federal ownership.
Fort Hood, near Killeen in the middle of the state - World's Largest Armor Post - was acquired by the government through eminent domain in the early 1940s. Originally established as a temporary post - Camp Hood - the terms of purchase allowed the ranchers who had owned the land to continue to pasture cattle on it (and some of their descendants still do.) If the fort is ever decommissioned, the heirs of the original owners have the right to repurchase their ancestral ranches at the price they were paid for the land when it was taken.
"National forests," in Texas, are "national" only in name. Texas' "national forests" are a hodgepodge of private farms, timber-company-owned land, state-owned land, and a little - very little - federally-owned land.
And that's why there is virtually no "public land" in Texas outside state and national parks.
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Old 09-11-2013, 10:34 AM
 
3,029 posts, read 6,909,639 times
Reputation: 3190
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Police, fire, range and animal management, liability, plus someone has to pick up the trash that most morons leave etc.
All of those are applicable to all land not just public land. Liability? I doubt that seriously, since the government is pretty much immune from liability on public lands.
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Old 09-11-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Blah
4,153 posts, read 7,646,575 times
Reputation: 3053
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
Found an interesting article as to why Texas doesnt have public land.

Why Texas has no

In 1862 West Virginia seceded from the Confederate state of Virginia and petitioned the United States for admission to the Union as a state. It was accepted.
The other is Texas. Texas is the only state to join the United States by treaty. As an independent republic for 10 years, Texas owned all land within its borders not previously granted or sold-and that was about ⅔ of the present state. Texas also had a treaty-legal - though unenforceable - claim to about of New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle, a little piece of the southwest corner of Kansas, nearly all of Colorado east of the Rockies and part of the Rockies themselves, and the area around Cheyenne, Wyoming.
Following the Mexican War, in exchange for ceding its claims to the lands in present New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming to the United States, Texas retained ownership of all unassigned land within the current borders of the state. Those lands were gradually sold or traded off.
In the 1880s the state deeded some 3,000,000 acres on the west edge of the panhandle to an out-of-state syndicate in exchange for building the current state capitol building in Austin. Those lands became the famous XIT ranch. Although the lands covered all or parts of 10 counties, the XIT brand was not chosen to symbolize "Ten in Texas," as the legend holds it was.
According to historian J. Evetts Haley, author of "The XIT Ranch of Texas," the brand was chosen because it could be burned with five touches of a running iron - X, XI, XII, XIT.
Much of the land was set aside to be sold to build and support a public university system in the state.
Texas wisely retained half the mineral rights on the "school land," and when oil was discovered on it the
University of Texas system became the richest state university system in the country.
By the mid-1920s nearly all the state-owned public land in Texas had been sold. Texas' first national park, Big Bend, had to be purchased from private owners.
For the record, Big Bend was supposed to be an international peace park like one on the Canadian border, but Mexico has never attempted to purchase and set aside the land intended for the park on its side of the Rio Grande.
Texas' second national park, Guadalupe Mountains, on the New Mexico line about halfway between the panhandle and El Paso, was a private ranch that was deeded to the nation as a park.
What is now Padre Island National Seashore was so tied up in ownership disputes - my own family had a claim, having ranched on Padre for a brief period during the 1870s - that the only way to settle the disputes was to bring the place under federal ownership.
Fort Hood, near Killeen in the middle of the state - World's Largest Armor Post - was acquired by the government through eminent domain in the early 1940s. Originally established as a temporary post - Camp Hood - the terms of purchase allowed the ranchers who had owned the land to continue to pasture cattle on it (and some of their descendants still do.) If the fort is ever decommissioned, the heirs of the original owners have the right to repurchase their ancestral ranches at the price they were paid for the land when it was taken.
"National forests," in Texas, are "national" only in name. Texas' "national forests" are a hodgepodge of private farms, timber-company-owned land, state-owned land, and a little - very little - federally-owned land.
And that's why there is virtually no "public land" in Texas outside state and national parks.
Yup, Basic Texas History 101

Talking about the XIT ranch, they once caught a cattle rustler who figured out how to change the XIT brand and resale the cattle. I can't recall whom, but they actually paid the person something like a $1,000 if they would explain how they did it. If you look at the actual XIT brand, the letters are slanted. The cattle rustle used what is called a "Running Iron" (tool used by rusters and looks like hook) to change the XIT brand into a Star shape.
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