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Old 09-19-2013, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Wylie, Texas
1,545 posts, read 2,290,421 times
Reputation: 2345

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngstarr View Post
I had this happen to me a few months ago and felt violated. I had no idea it was a thing. I love living near downtown for many of the reasons people have stated, but having this occur did make me far less comfortable walking around even my safe neighborhood.

Yeah, it was a shock when my brother told me about it the first time, after the second time I became kind of paranoid...and this is guys, so I can only imagine that for women it would be ten times worse.
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Old 09-19-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Wylie, Texas
1,545 posts, read 2,290,421 times
Reputation: 2345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grainraiser View Post
Crime can happen to you regardless were you live. That is a fact and as I tell everyone, using common sense will take you a long way in life. If you think you are immune to crime living in the burbs your wrong. Sure there is more crime in Dallas but it is because Dallas is more diverse than the burbs. You have people from all economic backgrounds living close together. I live in the burbs and wish like hell I could move back to the city.

Yes, crime can happen anywhere, including the suburbs, but for you to find a comparable part of Dallas where it is as GENERALLY safe as teh burbs, you are probably going to have to pay MUCH MORE than what you paid to live in your Mesquite suburb. Not worth it to me. YMMV.
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Old 09-19-2013, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Wylie, Texas
1,545 posts, read 2,290,421 times
Reputation: 2345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
Please people -- if I said half the stuff about the suburbs as y'all say about big bad big D, you would jump down my throat. Guess what I have lived in EAST Dallas and Lakewood nearly all my life and have not been robbed, "propositioned" or whatever...I have several properties and only once in the last 30 years was one burglarized - and that was the kid next door. I broke the lock on my garage and it has been unlocked for years. I have accidentally left the front door wide open a few nights and left windows open with no locks or screens.

So much for 10 minutes, try over 50 years...

Lakewooder, I believe you when you talk about the safety of Lakewood, but you kind of proved my point. Like I said, to get the comparable safety that is taken for granted in the burbs, you essentially are limited to wealthy areas like Lakewood, Park Cities, Preston Hollow...areas which are beyond the reach of most of us. I think the sad thing about Dallas is that when we are talking about high crime and other ills, me and the other posters are talking about some of the nicer parts of Dallas like Uptown, NOT the dangerous parts like South Oakcliff or Pleasant Grove. That should be food for thought there.
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Old 09-19-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Prosper
6,268 posts, read 12,105,445 times
Reputation: 9325
Quote:
Originally Posted by biafra4life View Post
Lakewooder, I believe you when you talk about the safety of Lakewood, but you kind of proved my point. Like I said, to get the comparable safety that is taken for granted in the burbs, you essentially are limited to wealthy areas like Lakewood, Park Cities, Preston Hollow...areas which are beyond the reach of most of us. I think the sad thing about Dallas is that when we are talking about high crime and other ills, me and the other posters are talking about some of the nicer parts of Dallas like Uptown, NOT the dangerous parts like South Oakcliff or Pleasant Grove. That should be food for thought there.
Absolutely. I forgot to mention another thing that happened during my time there. I had a condo with a one car garage. Well, at one point I had two cars, my nice car, and then I bought another car to commute to work (~60 miles a day, in Westlake.) That car was a convertible with a soft top. I had the car parked in my driveway as usual, when overnight, someone came along and cut open the soft top to get inside the car. Only thing I had in there was a small case of CD's, no valuables were in plain sight in the car, but they did it anyway. The worst part was, I was out of town on business, and it was a couple days before I got back to see it. During that time, it had rained several times. Leather seats and carpet were ruined. That was the first time it happened. After that, I stopped locking the doors to that car overnight and just made sure nothing was in it. About a year or two later, it happened again, they didn't even bother to try the door to open it, just cut the top again, all for nothing.

I would consider the area to be a nice area for Dallas (I was about .2 of a mile from the Mansion on Turtle Creek!)
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Old 09-19-2013, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Irving, TX
622 posts, read 561,522 times
Reputation: 915
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grainraiser View Post
Crime can happen to you regardless were you live. That is a fact and as I tell everyone, using common sense will take you a long way in life. If you think you are immune to crime living in the burbs your wrong. Sure there is more crime in Dallas but it is because Dallas is more diverse than the burbs. You have people from all economic backgrounds living close together. I live in the burbs and wish like hell I could move back to the city.
That's bunk. Irving is more diverse than Dallas is any day of the week, and significantly safer as well.
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Old 09-19-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Irving, TX
622 posts, read 561,522 times
Reputation: 915
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidicarus89 View Post
And thank you for actually understanding what Smart Code's goals are. Current planning since WWII has been to limit developers, i.e. "no, you can't build commercial here, its too close to residential zoning", and Smart Code encourages mixed-use for more efficient uses of space. Its essentially just traditional planning-the way communities have developed for thousands of years prior to the time we all decided cities need to be built on car-scale instead of human-scale, and that people needed to all live in one place and work somewhere across the city. I guess we've only just come to our senses that our current city-planning philosophy isn't sustainable.
Agreed. Houston's got us on this one in a major way, and improving this would create lots of little loci that would wind up forming much healthier and more coherent communities.
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Old 09-19-2013, 09:42 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,599 posts, read 31,143,716 times
Reputation: 26656
Quote:
Originally Posted by MckinneyOwnr View Post
Absolutely. I forgot to mention another thing that happened during my time there. I had a condo with a one car garage. Well, at one point I had two cars, my nice car, and then I bought another car to commute to work (~60 miles a day, in Westlake.) That car was a convertible with a soft top. I had the car parked in my driveway as usual, when overnight, someone came along and cut open the soft top to get inside the car. Only thing I had in there was a small case of CD's, no valuables were in plain sight in the car, but they did it anyway. The worst part was, I was out of town on business, and it was a couple days before I got back to see it. During that time, it had rained several times. Leather seats and carpet were ruined. That was the first time it happened. After that, I stopped locking the doors to that car overnight and just made sure nothing was in it. About a year or two later, it happened again, they didn't even bother to try the door to open it, just cut the top again, all for nothing.

I would consider the area to be a nice area for Dallas (I was about .2 of a mile from the Mansion on Turtle Creek!)
That's awful.

Even though you can be a victim of crime anywhere, most of the people I know who have experienced car or home break-ins have been in certain areas of Dallas, mostly 75231, 75214, 75206, and the Uptown area (don't know the zip).
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Old 09-19-2013, 10:19 AM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,962,830 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post

Can you guys give me some current examples of this kind of thing?
Smarcode is all about appropriate context, i.e. sticking a 40 story tower in the middle of the neighborhood doesn't fit the surrounding environment well, but a modest 3-4 story apartment building does. It greatly depends on the area you're looking at.

I'm from El Paso, so of course I have to give a shout out to a few examples of the master plan they adopted a few years ago:



This is a highly conceptual image but it shows the importance of creating greenspace and aesthetically pleasing landscapes. Note that while there are also apartment buildings toward the left, they're broken up by the large green lawn, and city blocks are on a smaller scale that in the suburbs. This'll never actually come to fruition, but its a good blueprint for what works in different areas.

For a good example of how single family homes fit into the plan, this is a project in development on the city's Westside:



While still a conceptual image, note that the city blocks are more compact, use of tree-lined streets to encourage pedestrian use, preservation of the natural arroyo in the center of the image and a small "main street" toward the entrance of the development. Small-scale commercial development like this encourages more local business because of the proximity to homes.

Another view of the "Main Street":



Of course for your young professional crowd developments like this are similar to what you see going on around West Village (and driving by a while back I have a suspicion they were very much inspired by West Village):

This one is called Monticello, a huge development also going up on the city's Westside, with an Alamo Drafthouse and entertainment district being built right across the street:



Apartments/condos on left, entertainment district on right:



So you can get an idea of the scale we're talking about:



So, I hope that somewhat helps, though there are probably better examples out there. A lot of people like single family homes (myself included) but its good to see that at least there are options nowadays for people who want to live closer to the city and want to have the option of walking.
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Old 09-19-2013, 12:40 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,779,846 times
Reputation: 6264
Quote:
Originally Posted by biafra4life View Post
Lakewooder, I believe you when you talk about the safety of Lakewood, but you kind of proved my point. Like I said, to get the comparable safety that is taken for granted in the burbs, you essentially are limited to wealthy areas like Lakewood, Park Cities, Preston Hollow...areas which are beyond the reach of most of us. I think the sad thing about Dallas is that when we are talking about high crime and other ills, me and the other posters are talking about some of the nicer parts of Dallas like Uptown, NOT the dangerous parts like South Oakcliff or Pleasant Grove. That should be food for thought there.
I don't actually live in Lakewood Proper, I live in Junius Heights Historic District. Every time that neighborhood comes up here as an affordable (you can sometimes find something between $100 and $200K) place, several people will post that it's unsafe. I've had no trouble, and I've been here over a dozen years and owned the property since 1986. I only have one property in Lakewood Proper. The others are on the edges of Lakewood and are very affordable (less than 200K) and I have a couple on the Henderson side of Knox-Henderson (probably worth around $200 - $250K).

I have friends who live in cheap apartments and four plexes also. For example, I know two people who grew up in HP who live in such on Gaston and another is a Lakewood friend who lives by Lakewood Shopping Center (he grew up in a Tokalon mansion - he could afford anything believe me). Cheap as in around $500 per month.
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Old 09-19-2013, 01:18 PM
 
1,282 posts, read 2,976,793 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidicarus89 View Post
Even if you live in the suburbs who wouldn't appreciate smarter zoning to allow a dry cleaner's to be on your block, or a grocery store you could walk to without having to get in your car and drive several miles? Better planning at least gives you the option of going for a quick walk to get something from the store. The way American cities are right now, there's hardly even the option to.

Smartcode has different levels of density; you guys are acting like the only choice that can exist is the far-flung suburbs or living like sardines in a dense urban core. There's a lot of development in-between that fits anyone's preference. I couldn't see myself raising kids in a cramped apartment or condo downtown either, but I hope I can find a house in a neighborhood where I can walk or ride my bike without getting mowed down by some soccer mom in a Lexus, where a lot of what I need is within a mile or two radius. It just doesn't make sense to build giant housing developments that span miles without adequate commercial development mixed in there. If the last 60 years or so have proven, that model hasn't worked but to increase our car dependence.
I know someone already brought this up...but a well-done master-planned community accomplishes those things. Of course, not all MPCs (no idea if that is an actual acronym but I'm using it anyway...lol) are created equal. Notice I said well-done. I am not taking about a massive housing development with a waterpark. I am talking about a mix of all things needed in day to day life. Ones that were done correctly DO HAVE walkability to retail, restaurants, grocery stores, offices or even corporate centers within their boundaries. They often have a commercial center at the middle of the community. They have well thought-out and accessible open spaces and parks. Not only are they walkable, but they are pleasurable and safe to walk through. They have a variety of housing options, from apartments, to starter homes, to higher- end single family homes, to retirement homes.
Not to say that you have to have a MPC to accomplish this...you definitely don't. Many older communities were done this way by default, as that just made sense (and still does). But once suburban sprawl really took off, people didn't WANT to live near retail and commercial areas. THAT was the appeal at the time. Peace and quiet away from all that. It seemed it was an either/or situation. You couldn't have both. But over time we have realized that that just isn't practical. So, despite typically being in the suburbs (because that is where land was available when this style community started taking off), a GOOD MPC is out addressing that issue...bringing the conveniences of life to your doorstep, while still maintaining a safe, family-friendly environment.
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