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Old 09-29-2013, 03:02 AM
 
4,061 posts, read 5,192,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieinDallas View Post
First, we would all need to agree on what Urban means. The word urban has a very vague definition.

Plano certainly has lots of amenities, but the overwhelming majority of the city is laid out in a very suburban sprawl style. You can actually fit the entire area of Downtown Dallas into the Legacy Area. Plano is running out of room to sprawl, in order to keep growing they'll have to start smart coding, and begin to follow the principles of new urbanism:Urbanism Principles

Ideas for retrofitting suburban sprawl are really interesting:
Ellen Dunham-Jones: Retrofitting suburbia | Video on TED.com (long but very informative)

The "Midtown Plan" for Valley View Mall will be a good example for area dead malls to follow. I could easily see Collin Creek and The Shops at Willowbend trying something similar if Midtown is successful. It would be nice if the malls combine with a CCCC campus and add dense housing units around the perimeter on the surface lots. The CCCC buildings are sprawled, and the land could be used a lot more efficiently, plus they don't bring any tax revenue.
Great post.
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Old 09-29-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Earth
794 posts, read 1,351,708 times
Reputation: 517
Thanks, but no thanks. :-)
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:11 AM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,965,793 times
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Yeah Plano seems like the typical Texas suburb to me. Sprawling freeways, development concentrated on cookie-cutter housing divisions and strip malls, and auto-dominant with poor mass transit. Certainly not urban. The closest Dallas has to true urban living is Downtown and Uptown.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:34 AM
 
3,812 posts, read 3,714,477 times
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Quote:
The closest Dallas has to true urban living is Downtown and Uptown.
Agree with that, but I think only around 20,000-30,000 people live in uptown & downtown, out of 1.2 million in the city of Dallas. There are blocks in true urban cities with 40,000 people per sq mile. But comparing apples to apples, Plano is at least as urban as the majority of the city of Dallas is, which is not very.

BTW, someone asked about Addison: it has lower population density than Dallas, not higher.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,913 posts, read 9,604,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
Agree with that, but I think only around 20,000-30,000 people live in uptown & downtown, out of 1.2 million in the city of Dallas. There are blocks in true urban cities with 40,000 people per sq mile. But comparing apples to apples, Plano is at least as urban as the majority of the city of Dallas is, which is not very.

BTW, someone asked about Addison: it has lower population density than Dallas, not higher.
Would like to see some numbers on Addison that would show the amount of land devoted to commercial vs. residential. There is very little elbow room in Addison, but it doesn't have a large residential component. Population density shouldn't be the only thing determing how "urban" a place is.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Earth
794 posts, read 1,351,708 times
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I was comparing Plano to other popular Collin, Parker,Denton & Tarrant county suburbs not Downtown,Uptown or Oaklawn.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:40 PM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,797,992 times
Reputation: 2073
The real questions are:

1. What is the landscape and city scape we want to be a part of?
2. What is conducive to having and raising and educating kids?
3. What is safe and clean and inspiring?
4. What has the lowest operating costs?
5. What tends to drive away corruption and fosters community?

Most of the posters on here begin with "received knowledge" that somehow "suburbia" is bad. They use key words like "cookie-cutter" and "mass transit" and "density" when these are just features of what is, not what is sought. And in many cases these are the result of the policies they are pushing.

Dallas inner city MUST have freeways and heavy auto traffic due to the high rises. There is very little for parks, or serpentine, savannah-like streets. The anonymity fosters crime and the lack of room to re-use the land hampers restructuring use models. The very irony is that the high-rise high-density encourages the very things most people do not want.

Ultimately, for something to be sustainable, it must provide for a mix of all ages and all family groups. Families must want to live there because it is families who have the final stake in renewal and upkeep. This then drives the growth and re-uses.
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:19 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,811,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX75007 View Post

Dallas inner city MUST have freeways and heavy auto traffic due to the high rises. There is very little for parks, or serpentine, savannah-like streets.
I am surrounded by parks, trails, creeks and trees! Plus three golf courses. I don't get into traffic unless I have to go out to the suburbs. Oh and and White Rock Lake/Arboretum - which suburb has anything like that?
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Old 09-30-2013, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,913 posts, read 9,604,923 times
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The bare bones truth is, if you brought someone from outside the area who had never visited and didn't have a map, you could criss cross this whole region from McKinney in the NE to Benbrook in the SW, from Keller in the NW to Desoto in the SE and you would not know where in the heck you were. You would know you were in a spread out large city and the only thing that might give you a clue that you were really in a different place from anywhere else was if you were in downtown FW or Dallas. The rest is pretty much built out urban/suburban development that is either commercial, industrial or residential. No one needs to get their knickers in a twist that any thing other than the downtowns of the two core cities is really anything different from anywere else from a purely developmental standpoint.
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Maui County, HI
4,131 posts, read 6,073,507 times
Reputation: 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by rantanamo View Post
What's so unique about it?
Its streets are laid out in a grid like old urban neighborhoods and it has retail close to residential

Sent from my SPH-L300 using Tapatalk 2
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