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Old 09-17-2013, 03:23 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,625 posts, read 31,237,055 times
Reputation: 26696

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
How does 'thinking like an economist' square with thinking smaller busses, ambulances, fire trucks would be atronomically expensive? Moving from a 6 lane divided road to a two lane road makes fire trucks and busses more expensive?

Can you sort of explain what you are talking about? How does the cost of an ambulance even compare with the cost of a 6 lane road?
I'm not buying it either. We had emergency vehicles in Europe that navigated our narrow roads which also had road humps, chicanes, and roundabouts as traffic-calming measures. Yet they still got through! Amazing, that.
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Old 09-17-2013, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Irving, TX
624 posts, read 564,649 times
Reputation: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Ok. Within all of that I agree with you. I can't think of a first world city anywhere that allows, "the average or just above earner" to live close to downtown and avail his family to good schools and live in a decent, less expensive home in a safe neighborhood. Certainly, there are tiny exceptions - a couple of plots in Austin east of 35 but within eye-shot of downtown leap to mind - but generally supply and demand curves close to desirable urban cores preclude the normal guy's participation.
Indeed. And given the next most-affordable options at such an income level, well, as an earlier poster pointed out, Upper Greenville is a pretty unpleasant place. Most City-Data denizens would rather chew off a foot than live in Irving where I do, but as an Irving-boy, I can say pretty categorically that this is how I (average salary guy) feel about Upper Greenville in turn. Viva la sprawl: if I were moving and not coming to Irving I'd take a 3/2/2 in West Plano, of which there are many within my price range and where the schools are far superior to DISD, any day and never look back.
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Old 09-17-2013, 04:06 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,829,439 times
Reputation: 6264
Upper Greenville has the new luxury apartments along SMU/Yale Blvd with lots of interesting restaurants and bars. Going farther north, there's Central Market and the Lover's Lane DART station, Old Town Village (mostly redeveloped), The Village Apartments, The Park Lane development aka North Park East, Central Market, Calloway's Nursery, Presbyterian Hospital, Royal Oaks Country Club and Golf Course, Harry Moss Park, White Rock Creek Trail, Lake Highlands YMCA...
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Old 09-17-2013, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Irving, TX
624 posts, read 564,649 times
Reputation: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
Upper Greenville has the new luxury apartments along SMU/Yale Blvd with lots of interesting restaurants and bars. Going farther north, there's Central Market and the Lover's Lane DART station, Old Town Village (mostly redeveloped), The Village Apartments, The Park Lane development aka North Park East, Central Market, Calloway's Nursery, Presbyterian Hospital, Royal Oaks Country Club and Golf Course, Harry Moss Park, White Rock Creek Trail, Lake Highlands YMCA...
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Old 09-17-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Dallas area, Texas
2,237 posts, read 2,767,880 times
Reputation: 3774
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
I'm always calm and I'm more or less never defensive.

1. Sorry I'm not trying to be irritating. I think like an economist, hidden costs, opportunity costs, marginal costs, scalar efficiency etc, and you think like an artist, what looks good, feels good, promotes social contact etc. is good. I'm betting that's a pretty fair assessment.

2. I pointed out, although indirectly, that while it's possible to buy smaller busses, ambulances, fire trucks etc. Doing so would also be astronomically expensive - ergo it's not going to happen.



I also want to underscore that while you and I agree about almost nothing I value what you write and appreciate your views on things. I'm used to arguing, professionally speaking, with guys about all sorts of guy/territorial things and guys hammer each other and call each other names and ten minutes later no one can recall the details.
For the life of me, I can't figure out why smaller busses, ambulances, fire trucks are astronomically expensive compared to larger ones.

You can't be saying that they are more expensive because a city would replace all of their larger ones with smaller ones all at once. Even I know that cities don't work that way. They replace as their current stock become worn out.

So, why is smaller equipment so much more expensive?
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Old 09-17-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,917 posts, read 9,612,156 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by happycrow View Post
Indeed. And given the next most-affordable options at such an income level, well, as an earlier poster pointed out, Upper Greenville is a pretty unpleasant place. Most City-Data denizens would rather chew off a foot than live in Irving where I do, but as an Irving-boy, I can say pretty categorically that this is how I (average salary guy) feel about Upper Greenville in turn. Viva la sprawl: if I were moving and not coming to Irving I'd take a 3/2/2 in West Plano, of which there are many within my price range and where the schools are far superior to DISD, any day and never look back.
Read the whole thread and agree with your posts. I don't disagree with many other comments on the thread, I too spent two years in England and like the walkable communities that aren't as car dependent. But I disdain the attitude of some that suburbs are wastelands and anyone living in them is conributing to the downfall of American society.

I see this same argument in the Atlanta threads. When we came back from England to Atlanta, I wanted to pursue living ITP (inside the perimeter... Atlanta speak for the same arguments used here). But finidng the right mix of affordable, good schools and safety sent us to Cobb County. If we had remained childless, yes, no problem, but children led us there and to McKinney when the move came to Texas.

The dichotomy I see from posters here. A recent thread had someone moving from Atlanta, a job on headquarters in Plano and wanted a more urban feel than she had in the Atlanta burbs. Several recommended Shops of Legacy area. The numbers that pooh poohed this (a prime example of a suburban era enveloping aspects of New Urbanism) was shocking. Some would have nothing good to say, called it suburban strip shopping with apartments on top.

In the end, you must do what works best for you and your family and let those in their ivory towers crow about whatever it is they have to crow about. All the best for you and your family, you are wisely looking out for them it seems.
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Old 09-17-2013, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Prosper
6,268 posts, read 12,150,887 times
Reputation: 9331
Excellent post Saintmarks. We have too many posters here who are cheerleaders for just where they live, and anything else is a poor substitute and anyone is a fool for thinking otherwise.

I don't get that mentality, at all. It's like they think they founded the town they currently live in or something.

Something to note... There are a variety of magazines and publications that do annual "Best Places to Live" stories, like Kiplinger, Money Magazine, CNNMoney, BusinessWeek, etc. Funny how you never see a large urban city like Chicago, New York, or Dallas win these things.

Nope, it's always the suburbs surrounding the cities. Until cities can compete with suburbs in terms of crime statistics, housing, school systems, traffic and etc... the suburbs will continue to grow.
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Old 09-17-2013, 05:49 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,829,439 times
Reputation: 6264
Lakewood ranks 9th on CNN Money's list of 'Best big-city neighborhoods" - Worldnews.com

"...The neighborhood is located about 10 minutes from downtown Dallas, has good schools and a low crime rate. During the 13-week Dallas Morning News’ Best Neighborhoods project, Lakewood featured prominently for East Dallas. It was ranked first for best neighborhoods for empty-nesters, city dwellers, wealthy buyers, in city suburbs, healthiest and overall. It was ranked third for safety, families with children and quality per dollar"
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Old 09-17-2013, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Prosper
6,268 posts, read 12,150,887 times
Reputation: 9331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
Lakewood ranks 9th on CNN Money's list of 'Best big-city neighborhoods" - Worldnews.com

"...The neighborhood is located about 10 minutes from downtown Dallas, has good schools and a low crime rate. During the 13-week Dallas Morning News’ Best Neighborhoods project, Lakewood featured prominently for East Dallas. It was ranked first for best neighborhoods for empty-nesters, city dwellers, wealthy buyers, in city suburbs, healthiest and overall. It was ranked third for safety, families with children and quality per dollar"
So, I made a post about "Best Places to Live," and you respond with a post about a ranking tailored to find the best "big city" neighborhood?

The two are not the same. At all.
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Old 09-17-2013, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,917 posts, read 9,612,156 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by MckinneyOwnr View Post
So, I made a post about "Best Places to Live," and you respond with a post about a ranking tailored to find the best "big city" neighborhood?

The two are not the same. At all.
Your own words above are apropos here:

"We have too many posters here who are cheerleaders for just where they live, and anything else is a poor substitute..."
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