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Old 09-14-2013, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Earth
794 posts, read 1,349,803 times
Reputation: 517

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http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/15/su...back.html?_r=0
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Old 09-14-2013, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Dallas
2,084 posts, read 2,447,065 times
Reputation: 3400
I don't think it's the end yet, but cities in DFW need to learn it's unsustainable, they simply can't afford to keep letting it go on.
Quote:
The price of sprawl has become been increasingly undeniable. Moderate-income families have seen their transportation costs balloon to more than a quarter*of their income. Cities have discovered that low-density developments fail to pay for their own infrastructure.
I'd love to see research done on how much sprawl is costing local tax payers, Austin recently had one done. Here's a good article on the cost of sprawl.
Quantifying the Cost of Sprawl - Emily Badger - The Atlantic Cities
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Old 09-14-2013, 09:02 PM
 
7,279 posts, read 8,112,371 times
Reputation: 5366
Sure lets force everyone to live in 100 story high rises.
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Old 09-14-2013, 10:17 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,813,434 times
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Maybe. But when you have job centers as far north as Plano...

DFW is also weird in how it is set up...it isn't your typical urban core surrounded by sprawl, but Ft Worth, Denton, Dallas, and to a lesser extent, Arlington, all growing together.

Quote:
Millennials, economically strapped and witness to the housing crisis, say they prefer to live in urban environments.
This was totally us. Both of us were raised in the burbs. (High school years in FloMo for me, Irving and Spring for my husband) We lived in the M Streets for 2 years before it just made more sense to move out to the burbs. We couldn't afford the urban areas and beyond that, it just became a hassle. Our move was precipitated by having a child, but we know more than one couple our age that have moved out of the downtown area after a few years for money/housing reasons as well.
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Old 09-14-2013, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Dallas
2,084 posts, read 2,447,065 times
Reputation: 3400
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Sure lets force everyone to live in 100 story high rises.
No one is forcing anyone to do that, and there are plenty of ways to make low density development sustainable and encourage incremental urbanism, without taking on large debt. The principles of new urbanism, should be followed, which actually allows a lot more freedom with land use, and design. Seaside, Fl is the perfect model for suburbs to follow:


American Makeover Episode 2: SEASIDE, THE CITY OF IDEAS - YouTube
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Old 09-15-2013, 12:16 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,599 posts, read 31,135,299 times
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I split the difference by buying in Richardson. Close enough in for reasonable commuting all over Dallas and the northern suburbs, far enough away to not have to deal with Dallas's problems or the increasingly insane cost of living close-in. Even if you make almost six figures, it's hard to swing living in a lot of nice areas of Dallas on a single income unless you rent or have a fat down payment.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Forney Texas
2,119 posts, read 5,486,895 times
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Home construction is going strong in the Forney area. We have 8-9 new homes that are 1-2 weeks from being complete just on my street.

They are also building a gigantic Kroger store (Largest in DFW) and several new restaurants have opened or are opening in the town.

Forney is also only 20 miles from downtown Dallas. Lots of people make the Forney to Dallas commute including myself. There aren't many places you can find a 2000+sf new construction home within 20 miles of Dallas for under $200k. Forney fits this description and that's why its growing rapidly.

Suburban sprawl definitely hasn't stopped where I live.
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Old 09-16-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Prosper
6,268 posts, read 12,101,075 times
Reputation: 9325
That article makes an awful lot of assumptions, and fails to bring up both sides of the facts for demographic changes. The article talks about how younger people are not caring about getting a driver's license or car... but completely forgetting to mention an important counterbalance like the rise of telecommuting.

I don't know what the employment situation is like for Minn, but here in TX, Dallas is certainly not the only job center. Most of the people I know who live north of say, Legacy Dr in Plano or 121, they don't commute to Dallas. They work in Plano, Frisco, McKinney, or Allen.

I'll agree that too much sprawl is unsustainable... but only if there are no job centers created nearby. The only reason I need to ever go to Dallas is if I want some good fish and chips at the Old Monk, or want to hang out with my "urban" friends in Uptown. Other than that, I'm never downtown anymore.
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Old 09-16-2013, 11:01 AM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,962,422 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Sure lets force everyone to live in 100 story high rises.
There's actually a happy medium between exurban tract housing and 100 story high rises, believe it or not. Smart Growth doesn't mean everyone lives in soulless lofts like West Village. Even single family homes can be built using more intelligent land-use principles.
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Old 09-16-2013, 11:11 AM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,962,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
I split the difference by buying in Richardson. Close enough in for reasonable commuting all over Dallas and the northern suburbs, far enough away to not have to deal with Dallas's problems or the increasingly insane cost of living close-in. Even if you make almost six figures, it's hard to swing living in a lot of nice areas of Dallas on a single income unless you rent or have a fat down payment.
If I end up staying in Dallas for the long-term I'd like to look for a home in Richardson, too. Driving from the Uptown area to UTD is about a 20-25 min drive (well, depending on how many wrecks there are on 75), public transportation seems to be decent, and while its a suburb you're still close enough to downtown if you need to go down there. Diversity due to proximity to the college is a plus, too.

Apparently its also the inspiration for the town of Arlen from King of the Hill too, so, there's that.
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