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Old 09-30-2013, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
8,866 posts, read 10,330,443 times
Reputation: 9277

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Quote:
Originally Posted by midnight12am View Post
What? Are you joking me? I thought even 40 year old women still wanted to be called miss now a days?
That's from the silly idea that ma'am makes one old. It's a sign of respect. "Thank you, Ma'am." "Thank you, sir." Drives me crazy that people don't embrace that. It doesn't mean old, it means respect.
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Old 10-01-2013, 06:36 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,618 posts, read 31,198,912 times
Reputation: 26690
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
That's from the silly idea that ma'am makes one old. It's a sign of respect. "Thank you, Ma'am." "Thank you, sir." Drives me crazy that people don't embrace that. It doesn't mean old, it means respect.
I say ma'am and sir.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:09 AM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,806,429 times
Reputation: 6264
So do I - also "howdy" but I do get strange looks from some.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:58 AM
 
Location: california
5,491 posts, read 4,566,174 times
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If I know the persons name, I use it if we are in open public, here in California. I can't remember any one using pet names for others in public, except exclusive couples of course.
As an old guy I can give compliments to women/ girls ,with out getting in trouble ,but I try not to do it when other women are in the same space , It seems to put an edge on their relationship I think.
But some ladies have distracting eyes/smile, that I forget what it was I was going to say.
Once in a while I run into an ex co-worker and we have both forgotten each other's name and go on in conversation any way. No one makes a big deal of it , we just start with a big Hi and move into discussion. Life's too short to get upset over formalities.
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Old 10-01-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,913 posts, read 9,602,177 times
Reputation: 5326
Quote:
Originally Posted by smuboy86 View Post
Just for curiosity sake were they black or Hispanic? To me it just comes off as antebellum, gone with the wind racial superiority BS.
Southern Manners 101:

Children should never call an adult by first name. When children are around their parents' associates and friends and might not know the last name, it is perfectly fine to use their first name with either Miss or Mr. preceding the first name. As southerners grow up, it will continue to follow them when speaking primarily with other adults who are older than they.

Southern Manners 102:

There is not a racist root under every rock you turn over.
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Old 10-01-2013, 01:01 PM
 
Location: San Antonio. Tx 78209
2,651 posts, read 6,364,770 times
Reputation: 1734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Southern Manners 101:

Children should never call an adult by first name. When children are around their parents' associates and friends and might not know the last name, it is perfectly fine to use their first name with either Miss or Mr. preceding the first name. As southerners grow up, it will continue to follow them when speaking primarily with other adults who are older than they.

Southern Manners 102:

There is not a racist root under every rock you turn over.
So you proved my point, it's a archaic piece of antebellum tradition that had no place in a modern setting like 2013 Dallas. Good to know.
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:06 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,618 posts, read 31,198,912 times
Reputation: 26690
Quote:
Originally Posted by smuboy86 View Post
So you proved my point, it's a archaic piece of antebellum tradition that had no place in a modern setting like 2013 Dallas. Good to know.
Huh? It's not rude at all to refer to someone as "Miss Amy" or "Mister Steve". I wouldn't let a child call me "Jane", I'd think it was rude. I prefer "Miss Jane". I don't even respond to my nephew unless he prefaces my name with "Aunt" or "Auntie".
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: San Antonio. Tx 78209
2,651 posts, read 6,364,770 times
Reputation: 1734
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
Huh? It's not rude at all to refer to someone as "Miss Amy" or "Mister Steve". I wouldn't let a child call me "Jane", I'd think it was rude. I prefer "Miss Jane". I don't even respond to my nephew unless he prefaces my name with "Aunt" or "Auntie".
That's not what I said. The way I have had it explained to me from an early age, mostly by women that would self identify as second wave feminists is that Mrs., Ms. (Miz), Mr., sir or ma'am is appropriate. We aren't talking about familiar terms. Referring to someone as miss, implies that she is either unmarried or uneducated, both are rude assumptions.
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:53 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,618 posts, read 31,198,912 times
Reputation: 26690
Quote:
Originally Posted by smuboy86 View Post
That's not what I said. The way I have had it explained to me from an early age, mostly by women that would self identify as second wave feminists is that Mrs., Ms. (Miz), Mr., sir or ma'am is appropriate. We aren't talking about familiar terms. Referring to someone as miss, implies that she is either unmarried or uneducated, both are rude assumptions.
I think you're reading too much into it. To me it's all about intent, and I don't think my dentist or my neighbors are out to hurt my feelings.
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Old 10-01-2013, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,913 posts, read 9,602,177 times
Reputation: 5326
Quote:
Originally Posted by smuboy86 View Post
That's not what I said. The way I have had it explained to me from an early age, mostly by women that would self identify as second wave feminists is that Mrs., Ms. (Miz), Mr., sir or ma'am is appropriate. We aren't talking about familiar terms. Referring to someone as miss, implies that she is either unmarried or uneducated, both are rude assumptions.
Miss before a first name for any older woman is still totally acceptable and even preferred by southerners. It has NOTHING to do with marital status, never did and never will. Miss before a last name is considered archaic yes. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to comprehend the difference.
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