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Old 07-14-2014, 12:09 PM
 
8 posts, read 15,583 times
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Our foundation repair man, suggested I have our bradford pear trees removed from our home, says he's sure that's what is causing our cracks, we don't have any crack on the other side of our home where we don't have any bradford pear trees...Does anyone have any advice, does this seem like a common cause of foundation issues? He says we've definitely caught in early, and our garage is only slightly effected now.
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Old 07-14-2014, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Grapevine, Texas
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How close are they to the house?
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Old 07-14-2014, 02:08 PM
 
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One is about 6 feet from our garage, the other 2 are about 15 feet away from our home give or take.
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Old 07-14-2014, 02:09 PM
 
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I am definitely not a gardener but was surprised to see this post because one of my former neighbors (in another state) was pressured into removing her Bradford pear tree because (she was told by her immediate neighbor who was an avid gardener ) that Bradford pear tree roots are notoriously extremely shallow and weak and he tree was at risk of falling over. I guess I'm surprised that a tree with such weak roots could crack a foundation. But lie I said...I really don't know....
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Old 07-14-2014, 02:42 PM
 
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Well, usually, the roots themselves don't crack foundations. But they extract the moisture from under the slab and in this drought combined with watering restrictions, any tree could become a problem for a floating slab.
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Old 07-14-2014, 03:33 PM
 
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I don't know about the roots being weak, but the wood definitely is. Whenever we have a storm with high winds, you'll typically notice more Bradford Pear trees damaged over any other type. They are also short-lived trees (about 25-30 years), so if yours is approaching that age, it's not going to last much longer anyway.

Oh, and when looking for a substitute tree that is good for your area, this is a great website to give you a jumping off point:
Texas Tree Selector
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Old 07-14-2014, 07:37 PM
 
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get a second opinion
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Colleyville
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A bradford pear? Surely not.
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Old 07-15-2014, 01:23 PM
 
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I agree with JTCmom. When I lived in Alabama Bradford Pears were all the rage in new home landscaping because they grow tall really fast. Problem is their roots growth doesn't keep pace and they're top heavy. So it does seem odd (following the logic) that the roots would be strong enough to damage a foundation. Falling on the house is another story, they're tornado and thunderstorm magnets.
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Old 07-15-2014, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Austin
7,077 posts, read 16,885,085 times
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Get a second opinion. 6 feet away might be causing a small issue, but 15 feet away is plenty distance for them to be. Ask about a root barrier.

I've had a couple home owners needing to do that where they dig a trench about 36" down, fill it with, probably concrete, and the barrier prevents the roots from getting past that area so they can no longer take moisture from the foundation.
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