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Old 01-06-2015, 12:50 PM
 
7,890 posts, read 8,709,116 times
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The shortage of docs around here is fairly easy to explain.

1. There is a national shortage of docs.

2. The shortage is worse in Texas and Dallas for two key reasons; the most important is that Texas' population has exploded over the last 30 years. The number of TX medical residency slots has not.
Secondly, people forget that until Texas' lawsuit reform 12 or so years ago Texas had absolutely the most anti-business and specifically anti-doctor legal system in the country. Just before lawsuit reform Texas was down to three active malpractice insurers and one of those was the state itself. Texas trained docs were leaving the state in droves.

The problem is likely to get worse before it gets better. A frightening number of TX docs plan to retire over the next 10/12 years. Some of that is due to the Affordable Healthcare Act but most of it is we have a lot of older docs.

Last edited by EDS_; 01-06-2015 at 01:12 PM..
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Old 01-06-2015, 01:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
There are two DFWs: the one that most of us see due to our relative affluence (more affluent than average, anyway) with plenty of quality doctors a short drive from home, and the other DFW that most of us don't see and that some of us even pretend doesn't exist, where high rates of crime, poverty, and unemployment mean very few doctors and little access to quality, affordable medical care.
Most of that isn't very real.

1. I saw a report the other day, sorry I can't source it until it's published.....Dallas has the 12th highest real per capita GDP of any city on EARTH.

2. The real poverty rate in Texas is 15.9/16% it's 23.6% in California.

3. The violent crime rate in Dallas is 675 per 100,000 residents - Houston 992, Atlanta 1,379, Cleveland 1,383, Detroit 2122.9, KC 1,263, Miami 1,172.

4. According to the BLS DFW has U3 unemployment of 4.6%. That's better or equal to just about all large metro areas.

I get that U3 is higher here amongst African Americans and Latinos. But that is the case across the country.

Doctors want to live and work where they will be safe and make enough money to support themselves well and pay back their student loans over a shortened working life.
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Old 01-06-2015, 02:23 PM
 
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Texas is now a pretty good place to practice medicine but unfortunately there is a bit of saturation in alot of things especially with sub-specialty care. I don't think salaries are an issue (can't speak for the surgical specialties but I know mine is comparable to what colleagues are making at other cities)
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Old 01-06-2015, 02:25 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,840 posts, read 32,205,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Most of that isn't very real.

1. I saw a report the other day, sorry I can't source it until it's published.....Dallas has the 12th highest real per capita GDP of any city on EARTH.

2. The real poverty rate in Texas is 15.9/16% it's 23.6% in California.

3. The violent crime rate in Dallas is 675 per 100,000 residents - Houston 992, Atlanta 1,379, Cleveland 1,383, Detroit 2122.9, KC 1,263, Miami 1,172.

4. According to the BLS DFW has U3 unemployment of 4.6%. That's better or equal to just about all large metro areas.

I get that U3 is higher here amongst African Americans and Latinos. But that is the case across the country.

Doctors want to live and work where they will be safe and make enough money to support themselves well and pay back their student loans over a shortened working life.
Le sigh.

Didn't really read what I posted in your eagerness to disagree with me.

That's fine.
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Old 01-06-2015, 02:45 PM
 
7,890 posts, read 8,709,116 times
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Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
Le sigh.

Didn't really read what I posted in your eagerness to disagree with me.

That's fine.
With respect. I did.
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Old 01-06-2015, 03:05 PM
 
3,885 posts, read 3,910,385 times
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Quote:
Didn't really read what I posted in your eagerness to disagree with me.
I don't really buy your argument either. Even if Dallas was 25% impoverished (and therefore 25% under doctored), add 25% to the 241 per 100k total and you are only at 311, which is still below the average and median. Are you contending DFW is close to 40% impoverished? I don't believe the stats bear that out. Also, DFW rates well below many other more traditionally median-income metros, such as New Orleans, Kansas City, Detroit, Birmingham AL, and other rust belt cities.

If this number was measuring access to doctors by zip or something else, then I'd agree that a portion of Dallas is underdoctored. But ALL of DFW is underdoctored in comparison with the 50 largest MSAs, and by a large margin. If you take Annikan's number to be accurate (I couldn't find the number myself, so kudos!), Dallas county itself at 279 is actually better than DFW's average. So some of the other counties that make up the MSA must be seriously under-doctored.
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Old 01-06-2015, 03:30 PM
 
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Most folks file the American Community Survey in the compost pile, I can guarantee my doctor didn't return it.
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Old 01-06-2015, 04:26 PM
 
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Like most big cities, Dallas is pretty saturated.
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Old 01-07-2015, 07:43 AM
 
250 posts, read 267,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
What's the deal? Dallas-area salaries low, hospital building lagging residental growth, the low insured rate not able to support an average number of doctors? Is the stat wrong? Anyone have a clue?
Sorry but I failed to see what the problem is. It clearly makes sense to me that dallas have less doctors than boston and coastal cities. If we have less doctors per resident than Kansas city or OKC than there is a problem. I think the problem is not so much Dallas have too few doctors, its the other cities have too many
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Old 01-07-2015, 10:41 AM
 
Location: plano
6,311 posts, read 7,860,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Johnw2,
That's not really accurate. A very well respected ranking from a Chinese University that rates medical schools mainly by research volume and quality ranks UTSW #6 in the world behind Harvard, UCSF, University of Washington, Johns Hopkins and Columbia. MD Anderson is #17. That puts UTSW ahead of Stanford, Mayo, Michigan, UNC, UCLA, Oxford, Yale, Duke, Penn and many others.

UTSW has 5 Nobel Prize Winners on staff. Last time I looked there were 0 at MD Anderson. Harvard has 0 as well. UTSW has more National Academy of Science Members on staff than all other Texas school combined - the school has 21 NAS members if memory serves and a number of Howard Hughes Medical Investigators. IIRC there is 1 NAS member at MD Anderson.

UTSW has 14 residency programs ranked in the top 25 in the country including plastic surgery at #1.

The new UTSW/Clement's Hospital is amazing.

William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital - UT Southwestern, Dallas, Texas

UTSW Earns Place Among the World

UT Southwestern residency programs ranked among best in nation: September 2014 News Releases - UT Southwestern, Dallas, Texas


Sorry that came off as terse I didn't intend for that.
I will stand by my position that Houston rather than Dallas gets more patients from out of the city area. I can not speak for all the cities higher in Docs per population. I am not saying the medical education facilities are bad, just small compared to the Houston Med center in terms of impact on the docs per population metric.
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