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Old 01-10-2015, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2,828 posts, read 3,390,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by synchronicity View Post
Actually, it's the houses in general rather than the age of the schools that always brings a smile. Mainly because DFW is so fixated on "new construction" in most places, but the one area that is the most desirable and most expensive...has been around for a long time and has a lot of older homes and lots and history (which, of course, is part of what makes it desirable).

There's a lesson there, I believe.
Agreed, but SO many older houses are being bulldozed in the area left and right. New construction has really seemed to pick up.
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Old 01-10-2015, 06:53 PM
 
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Cottages in PC have a very short shelf-life these days...
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Old 01-10-2015, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Blah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bencronin04 View Post
Agreed, but SO many older houses are being bulldozed in the area left and right. New construction has really seemed to pick up.
This IMO has lead to the over population issue facing HPISD. New construction doesn't always equate to single family dwellings. During our short time in the district, I have seen them bulldoze small homes and build multi-family housing. In one case, they built an apartment complex. I think the city(s) should start placing a restriction on multi-housing.
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Old 01-11-2015, 05:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTRay View Post
This IMO has lead to the over population issue facing HPISD. New construction doesn't always equate to single family dwellings. During our short time in the district, I have seen them bulldoze small homes and build multi-family housing. In one case, they built an apartment complex. I think the city(s) should start placing a restriction on multi-housing.
Zoning for multi-family homes in HPISD is tightly controlled. Very few blocks, generally those near the schools, are zoned for patio homes, condos, townhouses or the like.

Many cities such as Southlake have almost no condos or apartments.

Overpopulation is a bit of a misnomer. The population of Park Cities has been relatively stable. What is changing is as older couples move out, families with more children move in, shifting the relative age lower. There was a report HPISD put out which was a bit McCarthy-esque but overcrowding in the schools isn't from the apartment kids nor condo kids, it's simply families with more school-aged children moving in.
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Old 01-11-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Southlake. Don't judge me.
2,812 posts, read 3,570,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyDay View Post
Zoning for multi-family homes in HPISD is tightly controlled. Very few blocks, generally those near the schools, are zoned for patio homes, condos, townhouses or the like.

Many cities such as Southlake have almost no condos or apartments.

Overpopulation is a bit of a misnomer. The population of Park Cities has been relatively stable. What is changing is as older couples move out, families with more children move in, shifting the relative age lower. There was a report HPISD put out which was a bit McCarthy-esque but overcrowding in the schools isn't from the apartment kids nor condo kids, it's simply families with more school-aged children moving in.
I was going to ask about that. Seemed highly unlikely that the HPISD area would allow widespread multi-family housing.

Regarding Southlake, there are essentially no multi-family units. There is the one development that is connected to Town Square that has townhomes, which has actually stirred up some "controversy" here (never mind the fact that they're brownstones going for 700K+, apparently "those people" could start moving in ). There is also, IIRC, a 55+ retirement community near the western end of Southlake.

I believe Colleyville has a similar set up, with a virtual prohibition on multi-family structures.

I'm not arguing the policy issues around that, somebody else could do so on another forum. Just saying that's how it is here and I expected Park Cities to have similar restrictions.
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Old 01-11-2015, 04:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by synchronicity View Post
I was going to ask about that. Seemed highly unlikely that the HPISD area would allow widespread multi-family housing.

Regarding Southlake, there are essentially no multi-family units. There is the one development that is connected to Town Square that has townhomes, which has actually stirred up some "controversy" here (never mind the fact that they're brownstones going for 700K+, apparently "those people" could start moving in ). There is also, IIRC, a 55+ retirement community near the western end of Southlake.

I believe Colleyville has a similar set up, with a virtual prohibition on multi-family structures.

I'm not arguing the policy issues around that, somebody else could do so on another forum. Just saying that's how it is here and I expected Park Cities to have similar restrictions.
What's interesting is that you can buy real estate in HPISD in a multi-family development for less than it'd cost to buy a piece of real estate in Carroll ISD or Lovejoy ISD. Granted, this is solely because Lovejoy ISD and Carroll ISD do not have multi-family developments within their district boundaries (with the exception of senior living communities).

Nevertheless, the option IS there for those wanting to live in HPISD to do so for less than what everyone perceives solely because of the availability of "some" multi-family housing.

I know this from experience because of the condo my parents bought when I attended SMU. It is in the city of University Park and HPISD. Yes, it mainly consists of SMU students and probably some SMU faculty, but there are no restrictions on who can buy there. The largest unit in this particular complex is about 1200 sq. ft and 2 bedrooms. Would I want to be a family in a 2 bedroom condo? no. But perhaps there are some folks with 1 or 2 kids who are willing to in order to be in HPISD. It's a free country, anyone can buy in the complex if they want to...just a matter of how much you can stand living in relative squalor just to be in HPISD, when you could actually buy a real house in another part of Dallas for the same price.

I also know real estate prices in this same condo are still in the low to mid 200s, which is the low-low end of the market for anything in HPISD. However, bear in mind all of the condos in HPISD at that price point (they are very rare) will have monthly HOA dues ranging from $150-500, which is a significant additional cost. You also won't find one newer than the 1980s for under mid 300s. However, there are options if you know the market and look for them.

Additionally, for those not looking to buy, you have rental options that are technically in a weird transitional area that seems like UP city limits, but is actually city of Dallas. It is still HPISD - the small sliver between Lomo Alto & DNT just South of Lovers. Other streets to look on for 'cheaper' rental properties are Glenwick, Normandy (near Hillcrest & also just West of Preston, Abbott in HP, Auburndale, Binkley, Rosedale, Milton, Granada, Asbury, McFarlin & Westminster...basically any of these streets immediately off of Hillcrest near SMU or Snider Plaza.
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Old 01-11-2015, 09:02 PM
 
1,212 posts, read 1,771,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by synchronicity View Post
Actually, it's the houses in general rather than the age of the schools that always brings a smile. Mainly because DFW is so fixated on "new construction" in most places, but the one area that is the most desirable and most expensive...has been around for a long time and has a lot of older homes and lots and history (which, of course, is part of what makes it desirable).

There's a lesson there, I believe.
As a former resident, I don't think that most people living in the park cities "prefer" to live in the older homes, but instead, that is usually the homes that they can afford to buy. My neighbors loved the feel of the city, the location, the schools, etc., but very few of them living in the cottages loved their homes. Many of the cottages on my old street had very poor insulation, terrible parking situation, small rooms with smaller closets, etc. Like many of my neighbors, I bought my house for the schools. When we decided not to use the schools, we got the hell out of there and bought a big new house in Preston Hollow for only 20% more than what I sold my cottage for in University Park.
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Old 01-11-2015, 09:39 PM
 
603 posts, read 676,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HockDad View Post
As a former resident, I don't think that most people living in the park cities "prefer" to live in the older homes, but instead, that is usually the homes that they can afford to buy. My neighbors loved the feel of the city, the location, the schools, etc., but very few of them living in the cottages loved their homes. Many of the cottages on my old street had very poor insulation, terrible parking situation, small rooms with smaller closets, etc. Like many of my neighbors, I bought my house for the schools. When we decided not to use the schools, we got the hell out of there and bought a big new house in Preston Hollow for only 20% more than what I sold my cottage for in University Park.
I prefer a renovated older home (with a seamless, well-designed addition) to a new build. Our home was built in 1920 and taken to the studs plus an addition 15 years ago. We could have purchased a new home when we bought (goodness knows there are plenty of builders tearing down and building new) but i like the quirks of older houses, and the look of old brick and stone vs new. I do wish we had bigger yard though....
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Old 01-11-2015, 09:55 PM
 
11,681 posts, read 21,258,728 times
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I read today that if the full recommendation (5th elementary + rebuilding Bradfield & UP + modifications to other campuses) is sent to and passed by voters in May via bond proposal, it will add approx $1,000/year per $1.0M in property taxes....article did not say how long the term/note would take to pay in full. That $1,000/year does not include purchasing land from Northway Church for the 5th elementary. I also did not know the distict hasn't paid off the 2008 bond yet.
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