U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:31 AM
 
3,633 posts, read 7,626,347 times
Reputation: 4902

Advertisements

And a pre-emptive answer to the question that generally follows: no, it is near impossible for a property to be rezoned from one ISD to another. So where it is now is where it will stay.

Last edited by MurphyPl1; 04-25-2015 at 09:57 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Wylie, Texas
2,374 posts, read 2,895,692 times
Reputation: 4067
yeah, I concur with TC here. The painfully honest truth is that if education is a priority for you (and clearly it is), then your best bet inside the city is Highland Park. As you don't have the budget for that, you have to go to the suburbs. Like TC suggested, Richardson is probably the best fit for your needs and budget.

It's unfortunate that the housing market has gone haywire in the last couple of years, because I would have recommended far north dallas with Plano schools as another alternative. Incredibly diverse (both racially and economically), yet all very high performing schools. But your budget would be very hard to get in Plano, so Richardson is a good place to start.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:36 AM
 
Location: North Texas
24,571 posts, read 35,215,500 times
Reputation: 28455
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
In Texas, school districts are "independent"; that's the I in ISD. Independent means they don't follow city boundaries, but their own. It's incredibly important that you validate the school zoning of an address with the ISD prior to purchase. The vast majority of real estate listings are correct, but every once in a while, an agent will assume and the assumption is incorrect.

Hence, there are homes in the city of Dallas zoned to Plano, Richerdson, Highlanf Park, and Dallas ISD's just depending on the homes' exact locations. There are also a few homes in Highland Park zoned to Dallas ISD, for example. Never assume. Always verify.
Yes to everything here.

Here's a handy tool to figure out which schools a house is zoned to in RISD. If the address isn't in the RISD, it'll return an "address not found" error. So it works even if you're not sure whether the address is DISD or RISD.

http://schoolfinder.risd.org/search.cfm

OP if you have any specific questions about Richardson, I can help you there. I can't answer questions about schools since I don't have kids, but if you want to know what life's like here I'm your gal.

Good luck with your house-hunting.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:39 AM
 
88 posts, read 115,261 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldKlas View Post
In general, the ISD's (Independent School Districts) are zoned to the town names they are named for but attendance zones quiver at borders so you'll find that almost every ISD contains some communities with addresses not in the actual town. This applies to many areas, Dallas address properties have places zoned to Richardson & Plano schools, maybe even Mesquite schools. Fort Worth addresses have properties zoned to many of their border burbs. A couple of Examples:

City of Irving: Irving ISD (not highly rated), Carrollton/Farmers Branch ISD (average rated) Coppell ISD (a top rated district) By the way, Irving is a burb that's not very burby and many homes in the Valley Ranch area are zoned to Coppell Schools. Example http://www.realtor.com/realestateand...82-25015?row=3

City of Euless: HEB ISD (Hurst/Euless/Bedford -- average to good schools) and GCISD (Grapevine Colleyville - good to great schools)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
In Texas, school districts are "independent"; that's the I in ISD. Independent means they don't follow city boundaries, but their own. It's incredibly important that you validate the school zoning of an address with the ISD prior to purchase. The vast majority of real estate listings are correct, but every once in a while, an agent will assume and the assumption is incorrect.

Hence, there are homes in the city of Dallas zoned to Plano, Richerdson, Highlanf Park, and Dallas ISD's just depending on the homes' exact locations. There are also a few homes in Highland Park zoned to Dallas ISD, for example. Never assume. Always verify.
Thank you both for the info! The fact that they are Independent school districts Independent of city limits does makes sense. Highland Park and University Park are what's considered the "Park Cities" yes? I'm assuming that these towns are zoned for awesome schools because of the affluence of these places, am I right?

They seem to be smack in the middle of the city which is a plus too. Would a Dallas home that's assigned to a Highland Park ISD school have a difference in pricing than a home in Highland Park proper? If we could get into an area like that, it would be ideal for us!

Is there any rhyme or reason to the boundaries? Like zip codes or something or do you just always have to check? Is there a Dallas County ISD attendance zone map out there by any chance?

Also, the patchwork of school districts reminds me a bit of a suburban area over here, Long Island. There is a lot of overlapping bureaucracy over there like school districts, towns, villages, cities, hamlets etc. and the taxes to pay for all that is off the chain expensive, like $15k per year for a 1200 square foot ranch expensive. I have read that TX property taxes are high...but how high usually and do tax rates go by what city you're in, or what ISD you're in?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:48 AM
 
Location: North Texas
24,571 posts, read 35,215,500 times
Reputation: 28455
Quote:
Originally Posted by dag7763 View Post
I have read that TX property taxes are high...but how high usually and do tax rates go by what city you're in, or what ISD you're in?
Property taxes are assessed by the county, city, and ISD...and in Dallas County, the CC and county hospital as well.

Here's how mine break down on dallascad.org:

City of Richardson: $0.63516/$100
Richardson ISD: $1.34005/$100
Dallas County: $0.2531/$100
Dallas County Community College: $0.124775/$100
Parkland Hospital: $0.286/$100
Special District: $0.00/$100

I have a homestead exemption (which lowers my taxes) but the City of Richardson doesn't give me a break there. Some other cities do.

The tax appraisal value of my house is $190k, which is wildly different (much lower) than what I could sell it for if I plopped a "For Sale" sign out front. My tax bill last year was about $4300.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:54 AM
 
12,401 posts, read 23,835,444 times
Reputation: 11548
Quote:
Originally Posted by dag7763 View Post
Thank you both for the info! The fact that they are Independent school districts Independent of city limits does makes sense. Highland Park and University Park are what's considered the "Park Cities" yes? I'm assuming that these towns are zoned for awesome schools because of the affluence of these places, am I right?

They seem to be smack in the middle of the city which is a plus too. Would a Dallas home that's assigned to a Highland Park ISD school have a difference in pricing than a home in Highland Park proper? If we could get into an area like that, it would be ideal for us!

Is there any rhyme or reason to the boundaries? Like zip codes or something or do you just always have to check? Is there a Dallas County ISD attendance zone map out there by any chance?

Also, the patchwork of school districts reminds me a bit of a suburban area over here, Long Island. There is a lot of overlapping bureaucracy over there like school districts, towns, villages, cities, hamlets etc. and the taxes to pay for all that is off the chain expensive, like $15k per year for a 1200 square foot ranch expensive. I have read that TX property taxes are high...but how high usually and do tax rates go by what city you're in, or what ISD you're in?
1. Yes, HP and UP are the Park Cities. They are independent towns surrounded by the city of Dallas that have their own Fire, Police, & city governments but jointly share HPISD, which is the top public school district in Texas. Because of the outstanding schools and location, home prices are astronomical. Ie, on a real estate page I follow, I just today saw a new listing for a 3/2 cottage for $915k. The average home price is around $1.3M, including the parts of Dallas zoned for HPISD schools. You can get a small condo zoned to HPISD schools in the $400k range but not much below that price point.

2. Each school district has attendance zone maps posted on their websites.

3. Property taxes are high here- not Long Island high, but high. Rated are typically between 2-2.5% of a home's appraised value, and that % includes taxes for county, city, and ISD. If you live in Dallas county, you also pay for Dallas County Hospital (Parkland) and Dallas County Community Colleges. Dcad.org has all of the tax rates posted online. If you buy a home that is on the tax rolls for less than you're paying, plan to pay property taxes on the purchase amount because DCAD will find out how much you paid (even though purchase prices are supposedly private in Texas). Also there is a Homestead Exemption you can file once you buy that lowers the taxable value of your home about 15-20% in Dallas. It also caps the amount your value can increase by at 10% annually.

Bottom line- a $350k home in Dallas is going to run you around $7500/yr in propery taxes.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 10:33 AM
 
88 posts, read 115,261 times
Reputation: 155
Thank you all so very much. It isn't so much that I'm averse to suburbia (even North Dallas/Far North Dallas is suburban) it's that my impression of suburban DFW was shaped by when I visited a buddy of mine who lived in Frisco, and his neighborhood was blocks and blocks of the same mini-mansion in slight color variations. However when looking at different 'burbs on trulia, it seems that there are lots and lots of nice and very inexpensive ranchers that seem to have some more variation to them (maybe because they are older..one I have pulled up was built quite a while ago) in Coppell which seems like a great area with great schools.

Additionally, my wife saw something online in a neighborhood called Las Colinas, which is in Irving. Someone here said that parts of Irving are zoned for better districts right? Is Las Colinas one of those areas?


I hate to seem like one of those pushy parents that makes their kid do math for 6 hours a day after school, because I am not. However, I want my kids to have a fair shot at doing well and a good environment with students (and parents) who are dedicated to learning is the key to that. Unfortunately in lower income schools there is less of a peer focus on succeeding in schools, and I get that because I was one of those low income students and when you're in that kind of environment its hard to focus because there is too much other stuff going on. I have a solid career and didn't go to college, but I got lucky and the world is a different place than it was when I was leaving school at 17. It's important to us that they get good grades at a good school and then go on to some form of higher education, because unlike then, now there isn't that many entry level positions available for HS graduates in corporate America/the working world.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 10:42 AM
 
385 posts, read 401,431 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4Movingeast View Post
Where do I start...

"Well to do blacks" make no one "antsy." Poverty makes people antsy.
Gonna have to disagree with this. I know several well-to-do black families in PH that have mentioned the looks they get while being out or in the neighborhood.

Hell, I remember when my parents (both AA) were very close to buying in Highland Park and the surrounding neighbors were ready to disown the seller and post negative reviews about the realtor if they sold to a minority family.

Even as a young (21-24) African-American male making a little over 6 figures, I still sense the "antsy" feeling that the other poster mentioned when I'm in certain areas. Whether it's to visit co-workers for dinner in HP or to shop, it's generally true. It's just something a lot of people don't like to admit about Dallas.

Last edited by J800; 04-25-2015 at 10:51 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
6,583 posts, read 5,426,764 times
Reputation: 14544
Las Colinas has a small pocket in Hackberry Creek zoned to Coppell (tho most of Hackberry is zoned to Carrollton/Farmers Br ISD), some neighborhoods zoned to pretty good CFISD schools, and some zoned to Irving schools. zip 75039 in LC is generally CFISD which is an "average" rated district but those schools in LC are getting very strong and I wouldn't object to my kids attending them at all.

Much of zip (Las Colinas has homes in 75038, 75039 and a small section in 75063) 75063 and 75039 has a very high Asian/Indian population with parents in the medical and high tech industires and a very strong focus on their children's school performance so the schools' ratings in those areas get better all the time.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 10:54 AM
 
88 posts, read 115,261 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldKlas View Post
Las Colinas has a small pocket in Hackberry Creek zoned to Coppell, some neighborhoods zoned to pretty good CFISD schools, and some zoned to Irving schools. zip 75039 in LC is generally CFISD but those schools are getting very strong. Much of zip 75063 and 75039 has a very high Asian/Indian population with parents in the medical and high tech industires and a very strong focus on their children's school performance so the schools' ratings in those areas get better all the time.
Thanks. It was a townhome on Naples Drive in 75039. Coppell would probably be a better bet for us, simply because of the fact that single homes were in similar prices.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top