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Old 06-26-2015, 11:36 AM
 
33 posts, read 33,360 times
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We're interested in buying a house and had the inspection done. Inspection revealed noticeable cracks on the exterior bricks so we got a foundation company to come and inspect. They said the foundation is good and there is a little movement but it's within limits i.e. 1 inch. I want to add that apart from a few bricks that need patched/replaced, the house has no other problems like, doors not closing right or any visible cracks inside the house.

Would you buy the house? Is it common for slab movement? Do all houses have slab movement in North Texas. My last house was a new build which I stayed in for 7 years and then sold to an investor that bought the house "as-is" without any inspection, so I don't know whether slab movement is normal.
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Old 06-26-2015, 11:53 AM
 
64 posts, read 58,772 times
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How old is the home ?
I was told its going to be really hard to find a non-new (10 + yrs) home with absolutely no foundation movement.

We bought with 1.5 inch movement after consultation with a foundation company. It didn't seem to be a big deal as long as we were going to be putting a foundation watering program in place - which we did, and which consisted of me running soaker hoses around the foundation everywhere.
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Old 06-26-2015, 12:32 PM
 
33 posts, read 33,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chenven View Post
How old is the home ?
I was told its going to be really hard to find a non-new (10 + yrs) home with absolutely no foundation movement.

We bought with 1.5 inch movement after consultation with a foundation company. It didn't seem to be a big deal as long as we were going to be putting a foundation watering program in place - which we did, and which consisted of me running soaker hoses around the foundation everywhere.
It's a 1997. The previous owners were using a soaker hose and I intend to do the same if I buy.
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Old 06-26-2015, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Plano, TX
240 posts, read 273,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DfwNoMad View Post
We're interested in buying a house and had the inspection done. Inspection revealed noticeable cracks on the exterior bricks so we got a foundation company to come and inspect. They said the foundation is good and there is a little movement but it's within limits i.e. 1 inch. I want to add that apart from a few bricks that need patched/replaced, the house has no other problems like, doors not closing right or any visible cracks inside the house.

Would you buy the house? Is it common for slab movement? Do all houses have slab movement in North Texas. My last house was a new build which I stayed in for 7 years and then sold to an investor that bought the house "as-is" without any inspection, so I don't know whether slab movement is normal.
I was in a similar dilemma before I closed my 92 build home last year. I hired a Structural Engineer instead of a foundation repair company to do the inspection. After a detailed inspection the SE mentioned the movement was very much within limits and he did not see any reason for us to walk away from the deal. We still live in the same house and I run a soaker hose around the house and haven't noticed any issues yet. It is very common to see some movement on all homes but as long as the movements are within limits I don't think you have any issues to walk away. Just make sure to water the foundation once you buy the house.
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Old 06-26-2015, 12:56 PM
 
33 posts, read 33,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobr View Post
I was in a similar dilemma before I closed my 92 build home last year. I hired a Structural Engineer instead of a foundation repair company to do the inspection. After a detailed inspection the SE mentioned the movement was very much within limits and he did not see any reason for us to walk away from the deal. We still live in the same house and I run a soaker hose around the house and haven't noticed any issues yet. It is very common to see some movement on all homes but as long as the movements are within limits I don't think you have any issues to walk away. Just make sure to water the foundation once you buy the house.
How frequently do you water the foundation? Do you do it everyday? All year round? How many minutes each time?
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Old 06-26-2015, 01:14 PM
 
49 posts, read 48,262 times
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Guys I have the same question. I also bought a house with soaker hoses all around but have not turned them on . Could someone know how long and what time of the day/night they need to be turned on and with how much force of water? I see cracks around all those areas even with all the rain(Due to tree and house shade which avoid direct water)
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Old 06-26-2015, 01:31 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,820,882 times
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^We had soaker hoses put in with a new sprinkler system. I cant remember our settings, but we were told that the goal is just to keep the soil "normal" (as in not too wet or too dry). Might be a trial and error thing.

As for the OP, if a PE inspected and said you were fine, I wouldn't hesitate to buy the home. It's pretty common in North Texas, especially in the Irving/Coppell area
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Old 06-26-2015, 01:57 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
29,957 posts, read 34,568,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mSooner View Post
^We had soaker hoses put in with a new sprinkler system. I cant remember our settings, but we were told that the goal is just to keep the soil "normal" (as in not too wet or too dry). Might be a trial and error thing.

As for the OP, if a PE inspected and said you were fine, I wouldn't hesitate to buy the home. It's pretty common in North Texas, especially in the Irving/Coppell area
This is the correct answer and it will vary by house and location.

Not that much movement in Coppell (and west) but Irving, Carrollton, Plano and North Dallas down through Grand Prairie.

OP if you are really concerned, you might pay the $$ to get out a Foundation Engineer.
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Old 06-26-2015, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Plano, TX
240 posts, read 273,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DfwNoMad View Post
How frequently do you water the foundation? Do you do it everyday? All year round? How many minutes each time?
I have a big tree in front of my house that provides good shade to my house. During the inspection the SE recommended we put in a clause with the closing agreement to have the seller install a "root barrier" between the tree and our house and thanks to the "not so crazy housing market" then the seller happily got it installed for us. Again this was just a preventive measure as recommended by the SE.

I currently water the foundation every other day for about 20 mins. During peak summer I increase the frequency to every day and during winter I reduce the frequency much lower. Again it all depends!! Hope this helps.
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Old 06-26-2015, 02:10 PM
 
49 posts, read 48,262 times
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I do not have a sprinkler system so would need to water manually. I need cracks around all the house even with all the shade(guess the shade also prevents direct rain). Should i along with soaker hoses also manually water around the foundation area everyday especially during summer?
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