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Old 07-05-2015, 12:09 PM
 
1,787 posts, read 1,883,201 times
Reputation: 1706

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ312 View Post
In practical terms, you are correct. Trying to sell out of state transplants on the idea of moving to an older neighborhood in the Central Dallas corridor isn’t easy. The out of state transplants that seem most attracted to Central Dallas neighborhoods (between Downtown and South of 635) are recent college graduates looking to Dallas as a place to build their careers and to date.

Nothing south of Downtown is all that appealing right now. But things can change. 20 years ago, Uptown Dallas was ghetto and now it is a very desirable place to live.



As a non-parent, it is challenging to identify with this. But you are correct. The endless discussions on this board about school districts serve as testament to it.



Not everyone wants to expand vertically, but I think it is the better idea.

We are actually fortunate in DFW to have a situation where people want to live here, and we’re not a place in the Rust Belt that is withering away. Balancing population growth with environmental factors is a huge challenge.

I’ve been anti-tearing up land since living in Arizona. When I was in Arizona, I saw endless miles of desert being torn up to create a city (Phoenix) that couldn’t support the growth. Phoenix didn’t (and doesn’t) have the economic base to support the population growth that it has experienced in recent decades. In Dallas, we are fortunate to have a good base of Fortune 500 companies and a more pro-business atmosphere than Phoenix has. This metro area has to be cognizant of water issues, not unlike Phoenix. This has been a good year for water with all the rain, but some of the events of recent years should have shown the importance of hydrology issues in the region.

There’s a need for economic prosperity, but it should be sustainable and efficient. I don’t see suburban sprawl in areas like Frisco to be the best evidence of efficient land use. Frisco had a population of 6,000 in 1990 and it is around 145,000 now. McKinney’s had a lot of growth too.

I also do not think the Cowboys needed a new practice facility. There should have been $0 public going to it. The Cowboys should have either privately rehabbed Valley Ranch in Irving, which has been around for 30 years, or maybe built a new one in the whole new stadium deal.
As the parent of an 11 month old, if I went to my wife and said we are moving to South Dallas, or even most of the core, due to the fact I don't agree with sprawl she would be digging up therapist numbers. On the surface I agree with the idea of not turning over natural land.

If we could afford private or the Park Cities we would 100% be inside 635. However, what is available to us at this time doesn't work, so we will take a nice, newer, comparitively inexpensive home in CoCo. We both work in Collin County so commute isn't a big factor.
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Old 07-05-2015, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Lancaster, TX
1,463 posts, read 3,249,110 times
Reputation: 2180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewan View Post
Ellis County and even Best Southwest are still growing but the northern parts of the metroplex are growing their all-important tax bases and infrastructure much quicker. That's going to spur further growth - and further sprawl.
Thanks for at least acknowledging that there is growth and development taking place in the areas south of Dallas. You won't find much of that in this forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Souleiado View Post
But reality check .....nobody wants to go to work and even less move south of Dallas.
Fact check.... Could you please provide any sources showing population decline and job losses in the communities south of Dallas? Just because you prefer not to live in this part of DFW doesn't make your assumptions reality.

No one is disputing the rapid growth of the northern suburbs, but I find it amazing that in a thread having absolutely nothing to do with any area outside of Frisco and the northern suburbs, that some still find it necessary to bash and make blanket statements about other communities. That includes using "South Dallas" as a monolithic term to describe any area south of I-30 while making no distinctions between the actual "South Dallas" neighborhood, other neighborhoods in Dallas proper, and the suburbs south of the city.
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Last edited by Acntx; 07-05-2015 at 08:50 PM..
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Old 07-06-2015, 10:40 AM
 
Location: plano
5,952 posts, read 7,490,732 times
Reputation: 5006
I agree being a suburb of Dallas is a mega factor in Colin county growth. Both benefit from the ties to each other, it's not a one way street. Dallas benefits from Toyota moving jobs to Plano due to some features Plano has which dallas does not have in Toyotas eyes. There should not be an argument or jealously of this fact appears on thus site from time to time. It's childish on both sides part.

Same with higher density fans and suburb fans both exist and make the world go around, I fail to understand the ignoring of the legitimacy of the other viewpoint as some seem to.
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Old 07-07-2015, 08:22 AM
 
3,810 posts, read 3,703,126 times
Reputation: 4106
Quote:
Fact check.... Could you please provide any sources showing population decline and job losses in the communities south of Dallas? Just because you prefer not to live in this part of DFW doesn't make your assumptions reality.
There actually have been massive job losses and pretty significant population declines in south Dallas. It's not quite Detroit, where you can watch a neighborhood decay in just a few years via Google Street Mapping cars, but it's close, and of course it's not the entirety of south Dallas meaning everything south of I30. Population declines are a more sticky matter - parts of south Dallas used to be the equivalent of nicer parts of north Dallas, and poorer population has moved in, meaning population hasn't necessarily decreased, but economic demographics have shifted dramatically.
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Old 07-07-2015, 08:44 AM
 
198 posts, read 195,085 times
Reputation: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Souleiado View Post
But reality check .....nobody wants to go to work and even less move south of Dallas. The northern suburbs are the most attractive and developed at this point.
I think you're being a bit dramatic here. The past few decades haven't been good for South Dallas at all but to say that nobody wants to work or live there is an extremely ignorant statement.

These may not be the most glamorous jobs but jobs nonetheless

Warehouse construction booming in southern Dallas County

New leases fill millions of square feet of southern Dallas County warehouse space

Quote:
During the last couple of years a string of big companies including Quaker Foods, BMW, Procter & Gamble, Ace Hardware, Ulta, Georgia Pacific and L’Oreal located major distribution centers along I-20 and I-45.

This year’s deals continue the trend:

Chicago-based publishing, logistics and information firm R.R. Donnelley & Sons rented the new 823,379-square-foot TCC-Penn Distribution Center on Penn Farm Road at I-20. Trammell Crow Co. and Prudential Real Estate Investors developed the building.

Amazon is taking 500,000 square feet in Crow’s new J.J. Lemmon Distribution Center at I-20 and J.J. Lemmon Road.

Logistics firm NFI rented 650,000 square feet of warehouse space on Danieldale Road south of I-20 in ProLogis’ Park 20/35 industrial park in Lancaster.

And those are just the largest transactions.
As far as living South of Dallas... Take a look at Kessler Park, East Kessler, Wynnewood, Winnetka Heights, Bishop Arts and the newly announced developments around it, the recently announced developments around Trinity Groves, Sylvan 30, developments around the old Belmont Hotel, etc. You're looking at thousands of higher end apartments set to come online over the next couple of years as well as, countless remodels of existing SFH in and around the booming areas.

The northern burbs are the most attractive at this moment but South Dallas is starting to have a pretty nice resurgence
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Old 07-07-2015, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
472 posts, read 307,863 times
Reputation: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
I agree being a suburb of Dallas is a mega factor in Colin county growth. Both benefit from the ties to each other, it's not a one way street. Dallas benefits from Toyota moving jobs to Plano due to some features Plano has which dallas does not have in Toyotas eyes. There should not be an argument or jealously of this fact appears on thus site from time to time. It's childish on both sides part.

Same with higher density fans and suburb fans both exist and make the world go around, I fail to understand the ignoring of the legitimacy of the other viewpoint as some seem to.
Exactly. It's all one metro area sharing one interdependent economy.
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Old 07-07-2015, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Irving, TX
622 posts, read 561,315 times
Reputation: 915
As long as they never, ever, EVER come back to Irving, I'm a happy camper. Having to put up with how that team behaves off the field was enough to put me off the Cowboys for a lifetime.
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Old 07-07-2015, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Lancaster, TX
1,463 posts, read 3,249,110 times
Reputation: 2180
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
There actually have been massive job losses and pretty significant population declines in south Dallas. It's not quite Detroit, where you can watch a neighborhood decay in just a few years via Google Street Mapping cars, but it's close, and of course it's not the entirety of south Dallas meaning everything south of I30. Population declines are a more sticky matter - parts of south Dallas used to be the equivalent of nicer parts of north Dallas, and poorer population has moved in, meaning population hasn't necessarily decreased, but economic demographics have shifted dramatically.
I understand your point. The remark I was responding to went beyond inner-city South Dallas with the proclamation that "nobody wants to go to work and even less move south of Dallas." Areas south of Dallas have continued to attract new residents and businesses are coming into the area. There's plenty of credible evidence confirming that and refuting the broad-brushing negative statement, which was all I was trying to say.
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Old 07-08-2015, 07:36 AM
 
3,810 posts, read 3,703,126 times
Reputation: 4106
Quote:
There's plenty of credible evidence confirming that and refuting the broad-brushing negative statement, which was all I was trying to say
There's also plenty of evidence that the lack of building in south Dallas is not 'natural supply/demand', but rather purposeful, but I'm not sure it's worth it to get into it here.
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Old 07-08-2015, 07:51 AM
 
7,283 posts, read 8,112,371 times
Reputation: 5371
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
There's also plenty of evidence that the lack of building in south Dallas is not 'natural supply/demand', but rather purposeful, but I'm not sure it's worth it to get into it here.
If investors see reasonable risk/reward potentials they will invest.

That said, I believe one can make reasonable claims that some degree of true-redlining took place in Southern Dallas Co. in the past.
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