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Old 07-29-2015, 02:07 PM
 
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We are new to Dallas and daughter is extremely bright (ISEE stanines all 9s for comparison sake) but also a very serious athlete with college aspirations that include Ivies, MIT, CalTech, Emory, Rice, and UVA type schools and has these college coaches interested in her. Can anyone give me a real feel for Greenhill vs Hockaday? No need to comment on admissions as we're through that part - really just trying to decide if we go to Hockaday or Greenhill and how we really know what the big differences are either socially, academically or ability to get into her list of schools she is interested in. Thoughts?
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Old 07-29-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
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It's going to come down to personal preference for your daughter. Both schools have similar track records with big-name colleges.

Is your daughter intending to compete in college, and if so, at what level?

If D-I, the private schools might not be the optimal choice. Neither are known for turning out D-I level athletes. They'd be good choices if she wants to get into Rice or UVa, but maybe not if she wants to play at Rice or UVa, depending on the sport.

If she's thinking more D-III, such as MIT or Caltech, then she's good to go at either one.
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Old 07-29-2015, 03:37 PM
 
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I agree that it is a personal choice. As you know, Greenhill is co-ed / Hockaday is all girls. I think if the coaches are already looking at her, it won't make a difference. She will get a quality education at either one. Depending on what sport she plays, you will probably want to find a good club for her to train with. (In my opinion, this would be true for volleyball, crew and soccer)

Good luck with your move and your decision.
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Old 07-29-2015, 04:35 PM
 
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Thanks Big G. She has both D I and D III schools she is pursuing but all will need her to meet some level of academic standards. Even Rice wants athletes to qualify, and she is much more likely to play for an Ivy or a D III school based on her interests. I was just wondering what the feel is at the schools. Both seem like good schools, hard to know the feeling and ease of transition into their community when you are moving in the summer....
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Old 07-29-2015, 04:42 PM
 
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what year is she?
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Old 07-29-2015, 05:07 PM
 
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Both are great schools. Hockaday graduates confident, well-educated woman. Tradiitions are very important at that school. The school is well funded so they just built an amazing new science building and a performing arts building is next. Greenhill has a more liberal vibe since it is co-Ed and there are no uniforms. My son really enjoyed his visit and thought the campus was awesome.

The social scene is interesting at both schools since many of the kids have been together since K or Pre-K. If your daughter plays her sport at school, it will help her make friends.

I personally think the name Hockaday will mean more to the top colleges. I say that because my son goes to St. Marks and they consistently have a good number of graduates going to impressive schools.

Good luck!
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Old 07-29-2015, 10:26 PM
hsw
 
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Should separate epiphenomena vs cause-effect of schools vs wealth creation....

Suspect lots of smart kids who went on to achieve much career success did it by self-learning and despite, not b/c of, moronic formal education (and would note no HS/college can teach trading/coding well or at all; how can any, when no one good at this stuff would waste time "teaching"?)

Sure, some of modern wealthy got a credential from Stanf CS, etc: but don't know of any who admit they learned much from these brands; was a useful credential to get a first job in era when those credentials were more useful....not sure today, let alone 10yrs from now

But struggle to name any alums from MIT, Caltech or most of Ivies of past 30yrs who has created much wealth for self....lots of these schools are living on ancient reputations, have weak CS depts/alums and have recent alums (even from CS) with rather mockable incomes/net worth....and many of biggest wealth creators of past 30yrs are self-taught and/or dropouts/misfits of various sorts....creative destruction at its best
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Old 07-29-2015, 11:40 PM
 
7,292 posts, read 8,123,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Should separate epiphenomena vs cause-effect of schools vs wealth creation....

Suspect lots of smart kids who went on to achieve much career success did it by self-learning and despite, not b/c of, moronic formal education (and would note no HS/college can teach trading/coding well or at all; how can any, when no one good at this stuff would waste time "teaching"?)

Sure, some of modern wealthy got a credential from Stanf CS, etc: but don't know of any who admit they learned much from these brands; was a useful credential to get a first job in era when those credentials were more useful....not sure today, let alone 10yrs from now

But struggle to name any alums from MIT, Caltech or most of Ivies of past 30yrs who has created much wealth for self....lots of these schools are living on ancient reputations, have weak CS depts/alums and have recent alums (even from CS) with rather mockable incomes/net worth....and many of biggest wealth creators of past 30yrs are self-taught and/or dropouts/misfits of various sorts....creative destruction at its best

The OP asked some specific questions - I'll get to those in a second.

Your ramblings on this topic are as tiresome as they are consistent. And you focus on CS way Too MUCH. Most people have no desire to code or become a tech-disruptor. I think you are watching way too much TV. To whatever degree your thesis that college is a waste of time has validity that validity is made on the backs for people who are either geniuses or otherwise exceptionally brilliant or phenomenally lucky.

For the rest of us some facts remain that render your point absurd.
A. Amongst people 25-32
1. Those with a college degree earn $46,500
2. Those with a HS diploma only earn $28,000

B. Again 25-32
1. Unemployment with a degree 3.7%
2. Unemployment with a diploma only 11.1%

C. Again 25-32
1. Those living in poverty with a degree 5.8% (about 1.3% of this group are in grad or professional school).
2. Those living in poverty with a diploma only 21.4%

Virtually all of these numbers are getting worse.
A. In 1965 (using 2012 dollars) the gap between the degreed and the diploma'd was roughly $7500yr.
B. In 2013 (again 2012 dollars) the gap was roughly $18000yr.

That's all from The Federal Reserve, Pew Research and The USBER


__________________________

OP,

Running the table with all 9s on the ISEE is an awesome accomplishment.

1. Assuming your kid is a rising 9th grader either school would be a great choice IMO. I'd give Hockaday a slight advantage academically.

2. What sport? Neither school has strong sports programs. On balance neither school is remotely competative with Bishop Lynch or Ursuline girls sports programs for examples. Between the two it's a push generally.

I'll chime in with more sports comments later. My daughter had several hard offers and several more soft offers to play volleyball from NYU/Dartmouth/Trinity to an SEC school. In the end she just walked away from her sport to study engineering at A&M.

If your daughter is serious and good enough to have a shot get her on the NCAA Eligibility Center site (the site is terrible BTW it takes hours to fill out all the info.) by 10th grade and have her take the SAT very early - getting a qualifying SAT score allows coaches to communicate with you/her. Lots of deals are set in 10th and early 11th grade.
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Old 08-11-2015, 09:48 PM
 
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Sent 3 kids through Dallas private schools, Ursuline and Jesuit. Probably not politically correct, but the difference between Greenhill and Hockaday is centered on religious affiliation. One is predominantly more Protestant and the other more Jewish. The athletic equation is the same for both. If soccer, D-1 will look at both schools. Any other sport is a D-3 proposition.
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Old 08-12-2015, 03:16 AM
 
Location: The Village
1,622 posts, read 3,885,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisOSU View Post
Sent 3 kids through Dallas private schools, Ursuline and Jesuit. Probably not politically correct, but the difference between Greenhill and Hockaday is centered on religious affiliation. One is predominantly more Protestant and the other more Jewish. The athletic equation is the same for both. If soccer, D-1 will look at both schools. Any other sport is a D-3 proposition.
I think the difference between Greenhill and Hockaday is far more a matter of philosophy of education and of the parents than the religious preferences of the students, considering that both schools are secular. Hockaday has much more conservative parents, though the school itself tends to be quite liberal (which has caused conflicts between the school's administration and the school's board of trustees). Greenhill is pretty liberal all the way around.

I would say Hockaday has a touch better reputation, but it's really miniscule. Neither school is going to give your kid an advantage, nor a disadvantage, in applying to colleges or getting recruited. My suggestion would be to visit each campus and see which vibe feels better to you and your daughter.

If sports are a big deal, Ursuline is going to be the way to go--the academics, while not quite as strong as Hockaday and Greenhill, are still top notch, while the athletic programs are substantially better.

You also might want to look at moving into the Highland Park school district and going to Highland Park High School. The academic reputation is excellent and the girls' sports teams are head and shoulders above any private school.
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