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Old 09-11-2015, 08:06 PM
 
1,787 posts, read 1,885,270 times
Reputation: 1706

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
1. Swimming in local lakes is bad idea because the water is copy/confused because of boat traffic and summer winds.

2. People bike, run, walk like crazy all winter around here.


3. I really wish people wouldn't make bogus claims about the weather here.

According to The National Weather Service...............
The average longterm daytime highs in DFW are:
Oct. - 78
Nov. - 65
Dec. - 56
Jan. - 54
Feb. - 60
Mar. - 68
Apr. - 76
May - 83

Under no circumstance is that worse/colder than Seattle:
Oct. - 60
Nov. - 51
Dec. - 46
Jan. - 46
Feb. - 50
Mar. - 53
Apr. - 58
May - 64

So on average Seattle has 5 months colder than our coldest month.

The average daily wind speed here is less than 2 mph. higher than Seattle.
I have never seen a place that makes more bogus weather claims than here.
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Old 09-12-2015, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
5,080 posts, read 3,781,042 times
Reputation: 10068
If you can accept that late June, July, August and early September can have extreme heat then you can enjoy outdoors a lot. I almost moved away because of the hot summers, having lived here 30+ years. I wanted ocean and/or mountains in my daily life and thought when I retired I would make it happen. So far I am continuing to make Dallas home, but now that I'm retired I am taking lots of time away during the hot months.

I like the vibrancy of the city, the general cleanliness, and the fact that there is so much revitalization going on all over the city and the inner suburbs. I love the diversity. I love all the restaurant choices and in general the convenience of being able to easily find a parking place 95% of the time I go anywhere. Having done a lot of travel, I have learned that many conveniences of daily life are not readily available in many, many places.
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Frisco,TX
16 posts, read 11,798 times
Reputation: 26
Honestly you should move to OR, WA, or CO. Don't move to TX just to be trendy! LoL
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Both feet on banana peel's, on ice.
351 posts, read 419,062 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by silsil View Post
My question is: we are outdoor people, from California. We love to go hiking and see trees, lakes with our 2 little boys. Which are would you consider the greenest and also safest to live?
If you love the outdoors, I wouldn't make Dallas a top place to relocate. I love outdoor activities, and have explored pretty much every park & lake around the metroplex within 5 years of living here and I'd give it a 6 out of 10 for outdoor activities. DFW isn't exactly famous for outdoor recreation, but it offers just enough to keep your interests.

As others have said, you'll end up traveling outside of the area to find some outstanding outdoor stuff. Oh how I wish DFW was settled closer to the Big Bend area of the state.

Most people that I've met moved here pretty much out of necessity rather than true desire (In their own words). People move from higher cost of living areas for a lower cost of living, a career move, or both. I came here for career reasons but will be leaving soon for a place that fits more of our lifestyle desires.

There's a few nice green areas around here, however I like some of the areas around Eagle Mountain Lake in Fort Worth, but that's just my opinion.
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Old 09-13-2015, 06:05 PM
 
766 posts, read 1,302,472 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enough_Already234 View Post
Honestly you should move to OR, WA, or CO. Don't move to TX just to be trendy! LoL
You can move to Texas, just go to Austin if you want the Outdoors.
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Old 09-14-2015, 08:14 AM
 
Location: garland
1,595 posts, read 1,572,220 times
Reputation: 1969
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinemon View Post
Yep, Dallas is definitely a foodie town with a lot of fine/fun dining and Tex Mex & Middle Eastern ethnic food.
I think we just don't want to heat up our homes more with bothersome cooking and tend to eat out much more than most places as opposed to being a 'foodie' city. Every house has a double over but one of them never gets used.....
At some point, foodie changed from being a discriminating consumer to just liking food. Dallas is consistently in the top 25 lists for the fattest cities in the US. It's not because we eat well, it's just because we like to eat.
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Old 09-15-2015, 11:12 AM
 
461 posts, read 771,598 times
Reputation: 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdallas View Post
I think we just don't want to heat up our homes more with bothersome cooking and tend to eat out much more than most places as opposed to being a 'foodie' city. Every house has a double over but one of them never gets used.....
At some point, foodie changed from being a discriminating consumer to just liking food. Dallas is consistently in the top 25 lists for the fattest cities in the US. It's not because we eat well, it's just because we like to eat.
Completely agree. Just b/c every food chain imaginable is located here, it doesn't make Dallas a "foodie" city or destination. Those are NYC, Chicago, San Francisco, New Orleans etc.
I've found the vast majority of people I've come into contact with here have no idea what good food is. Coworkers sing the praises of Red Lobster, Pappadeaux's, etc. They get excited when a new chain opens in the neighborhood. It's just not something I'm used to. In New Orleans, most neighborhoods fight chains opening.

As far as outdoors, Dallas has things to do, but there isn't an overabundance of things to do. I predict you'd get bored quickly here.
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Old 09-15-2015, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Irving, TX
622 posts, read 562,015 times
Reputation: 915
OP: DFW has tons of trails.It is not at *all* hard to acclimate to the heat here. You just have to get out in it and drink a lot of water. I drink a gallon a day in the summertime and while I don't like the direct sun without a good hat, otherwise I could care less about the heat. We run the AC in the summertime mostly just to keep the humidity out, and that's it.

I'm not a native -- this is the furthest south I've ever lived. It's just... not hard.
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Old 09-15-2015, 01:55 PM
 
216 posts, read 249,055 times
Reputation: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enough_Already234 View Post
Honestly you should move to OR, WA, or CO. Don't move to TX just to be trendy! LoL
+1

TX might be greener than CA most years especially this year but there are better cities to live if you can find job.
Denver, Atlanta, Charlotte, Portland, Seattle are my choices for affordable outdoorsy places with jobs.
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Old 09-15-2015, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Colleyville
904 posts, read 893,577 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdallas View Post
I think we just don't want to heat up our homes more with bothersome cooking and tend to eat out much more than most places as opposed to being a 'foodie' city. Every house has a double over but one of them never gets used.....
At some point, foodie changed from being a discriminating consumer to just liking food. Dallas is consistently in the top 25 lists for the fattest cities in the US. It's not because we eat well, it's just because we like to eat.
I use my double oven all the time, I am not remotely overweight nor is my husband or our 2 children, we love to eat "well" by our definition which is quality, homemade foods on a regular basis, and we also enjoy patronizing good restaurants (independent, local/regional chains mainly- we very rarely visit national chain restaurants unless there is a school spirit night or a group is going and we don't get to influence the location).

I really dislike when people stereotype Texans as being fat buffoons that don't know anything about food. Makes me prickly. I have eaten at some of the finest restaurants the US has to offer, and I know quality, presentation, and service. Dallas and Fort Worth both have some wonderful options in all dining categories.
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