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Old 05-27-2016, 09:02 AM
 
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Some interesting stats about the generation everyone loves to hate. I'm an "old" Millenial.

The Real Dallas Millennial Isn't Who You Think | Dallas Observer
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:28 AM
 
Location: North Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceraceae View Post
Some interesting stats about the generation everyone loves to hate. I'm an "old" Millenial.

The Real Dallas Millennial Isn't Who You Think | Dallas Observer
I'm a Gen Xer and the people who are buying into my neighborhood now by and large are millennials, or Xers like DH and me.

Millennials get a bum rap for sure. I don't envy them. They're struggling to even do as well as their parents did, and they're staggering under much larger student debt burdens than my generation did. They're getting the short end of the stick almost everywhere.
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:50 AM
 
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I think this article applies to Millennials in most metro areas, not just DFW. I'm glad it highlights that many Millennials are debt burdened and/or may have kids. The suburbs for those types may be a more practical choice. Not all millennials are child-free, debt-free, hipster, yuppie, urbanites . But if you are those, especially with a good paying professional job, childless, and single, I highly doubt you'd be living in a suburban wasteland like Plano. The social opportunities, networking, dating, and just living life in general for those types of millennials, is far superior in Dallas than it is in sleepy blah places like Plano, Frisco, Irving, etc. Community resources and social opportunities for LGBT, African American, and Latino Millennials are much more readily available in Dallas than its vanilla suburbs.
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:59 AM
 
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I'm married with soon to be two kids and own a house in one of your blah, bland, generic, sleepy, vanilla places.

We make a large student loan payment per month. We both have bachelors degrees, and my wife starts NP school this fall. I may go back since employer will pay for it.
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Old 05-27-2016, 10:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Aceraceae View Post
I'm married with soon to be two kids and own a house in one of your blah, bland, generic, sleepy, vanilla places.

We make a large student loan payment per month. We both have bachelors degrees, and my wife starts NP school this fall. I may go back since employer will pay for it.
Congrats on the kids! My point is not all Millennials are the same, but there's most likely certain types that choose suburban living and not some loft downtown or bungalow within walking distance to Bishop Arts (e.g. married, kids, too much debt, etc.). A millennial with student loan debt doesn't mean they'll necessarily live in the suburbs, but having kids is a definitely a major reason.

Just to clarify, I had student loan debt as well. It would've made more sense to live in a cheaper suburb, but the quality of life there wasn't for me. We all make life choices to fit our needs. So I don't want this post to sound judgemental -- I'm just listing some reasons why Millennials are living in the suburbs.
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Old 05-27-2016, 10:31 AM
 
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I didn't take it as judgement. We have no interest in living in the City.
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Old 05-27-2016, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
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I guess DH and I are far from the typical millennial (we are on the older side too). Bought a house in the 'burbs in our mid/late 20s with no kids yet, he had less than $20k in student debt that he quickly paid off and I had none, and then we had kids. Our jobs are up here in Plano and Denton, so it never made sense to us to live anywhere else. We would still be living here even if we never planned on having kids. I like the 'burbs.
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Old 05-27-2016, 11:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
I'm a Gen Xer and the people who are buying into my neighborhood now by and large are millennials, or Xers like DH and me.

Millennials get a bum rap for sure. I don't envy them. They're struggling to even do as well as their parents did, and they're staggering under much larger student debt burdens than my generation did. They're getting the short end of the stick almost everywhere.
Yup...

Boomers: Worked at a gas station to pay way through college while driving a muscle car
Gen X: Worked at a gas station to pay way through college while driving a used escort
Millennials: Racked up student loan debt to pay way through college in order to then spend 8 months attempting to find work at gas stations
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:06 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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Originally Posted by ZestyCharles View Post
Yup...

Boomers: Worked at a gas station to pay way through college while driving a muscle car
Gen X: Worked at a gas station to pay way through college while driving a used escort
Millennials: Racked up student loan debt to pay way through college in order to then spend 8 months attempting to find work at gas stations
LOL, no way you could put yourself through college working at a gas station in the mid-1990s. The part about the used Escort is pretty accurate though. Tuition at UT-Austin was around $1k-$1.5k per semester back then, but living expenses would kill you. Even living in the dorms wasn't cheap. You'd be looking at about $10k/year in room/board/tuition/fees before books, gas, and other living expenses.

If you worked 15 hours a week during the school year making $5/hr (pretty standard back then), you'd make $66/week...or about $2375 over 9 months.

Full-time during the summer for 3 months, you'd clear about $2k after taxes if you didn't spend a single dime of it.

Verdict: Not even close to what it'd cost to go to UT-Austin and live on your own. You could choose to live with mom & dad, but if you were from a city or town without a decent university in it...sorry pal! SOL!
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:09 PM
 
54 posts, read 38,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
LOL, no way you could put yourself through college working at a gas station in the mid-1990s. The part about the used Escort is pretty accurate though. Tuition at UT-Austin was around $1k-$1.5k per semester back then, but living expenses would kill you. Even living in the dorms wasn't cheap. You'd be looking at about $10k/year in room/board/tuition/fees before books, gas, and other living expenses.

If you worked 15 hours a week during the school year making $5/hr (pretty standard back then), you'd make $66/week...or about $2375 over 9 months.

Full-time during the summer for 3 months, you'd clear about $2k after taxes if you didn't spend a single dime of it.

Verdict: Not even close to what it'd cost to go to UT-Austin and live on your own. You could choose to live with mom & dad, but if you were from a city or town without a decent university in it...sorry pal! SOL!
As a Gen-Xer myself, it was certainly possible in the 1980s depending on where you lived. Maybe not 1990s.

My post was also meant to be a comical representation of the trends throughout the generations, and to point out that economic opportunity has continued to decrease over time, especially for youth.
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