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Old 08-03-2016, 09:59 AM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,332 posts, read 3,933,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdallas View Post
Work?! History?! <gasp> clutches pearls....
As someone looking to buy in the next few years, I certainly don't want to dish out thousands of dollars for a roof, AC, carpet/flooring, plumbing work, and foundation work right after moving in. So I can definitely understand the appeal of buying a new home.

Unfortunately, there aren't very many new modest 3br homes being build in DFW.
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Old 08-03-2016, 10:30 AM
 
Location: North Texas
24,571 posts, read 35,617,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
As someone looking to buy in the next few years, I certainly don't want to dish out thousands of dollars for a roof, AC, carpet/flooring, plumbing work, and foundation work right after moving in. So I can definitely understand the appeal of buying a new home.

Unfortunately, there aren't very many new modest 3br homes being build in DFW.
This is why you have an inspection done.

I had my house thoroughly inspected before I bought it so I knew what needed work and what could wait.

Haven't needed a new roof, a new AC, or any foundation work. Every house needs plumbing work from time to time (even new ones). Carpet/flooring is cosmetic.
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Old 08-03-2016, 10:45 AM
 
3,378 posts, read 2,468,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceraceae View Post
Older doesn't always mean better. It can and at times does, but there are certainly well built houses today.
Correct. An important factor to consider too, is that a new home WILL be more energy efficient, no doubt about it.

Unless an older home has been thoroughly modernized and updated, with new ac/heating/ductwork/new insulation/new windows... they will be less efficient than any new home built today.

My mother had a real eye-opener when I bought a house that was 1k sq ft bigger, 20 years newer, and my energy bills were half of what hers were.
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Old 08-03-2016, 10:47 AM
 
16,931 posts, read 2,167,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
Not sure about anyone else, but I'd much rather have an older home. My parents bought a new house a few years ago in NC. Super shoddy building. I'd imagine it would be even worse here in Texas where they are putting houses up in a matter of weeks.

I guess the only bad thing about an older home is that work might need to be done, and some older neighborhoods look dated.
It was your parents' decision to purchase the residence, was it not?

Everything will look dated at some point in time and I mean everything.

Aside from items requiring settlement/curing a good builder using proven plans and subs - 90 days for a 3br is no magic as long as inspectors do not do what they often do in DFW.
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Old 08-03-2016, 12:49 PM
 
4,536 posts, read 2,538,550 times
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I've never understood the fascination in DFW with new houses. IMO, the style of new house that pops up all around DFW is ugly. There are weird angles everywhere on the inside in an attempt to make every room as "vaulted" as possible, most of the houses pretty much look the same and there is zero charm. It seems like 90% of new-ish houses in DFW's nicer suburbs are some variant on this look:



I'm technically a millennial, so maybe my view on things is distorted by some persistent, warped desire for "authenticity." But my wife and I just hate new houses here. We hate new houses most places, but we really, really dislike them here. Why people want to pay extra to live in a new house where all of the other houses look exactly the same is beyond me. The idea that a "used" house will somehow leave you with a big list of repairs is often miscalculated, IMO. Brand new houses shouldn't have these repairs, but houses that are new-ish (10-15 years) might actually be worse than a lot of older houses. 10-15 years is probably well over half the useful life of a roof in Texas. It's right around the time a water heater should go out. It's about half the life of an HVAC system. That house will still look pretty new, but some of the systems may need replacing soon. A lot of older houses have had these things done, and because people who sell older houses are conscious of buyers' concerns, they are often done before a house is sold.

There are certainly places a couple making $100k can buy a house and still be in a good part of town. The mid-cities such as Bedford, Hurst and Euless have tons of houses under $200k. Some of them are newer than 50 years old and some aren't. I think there are probably even houses in Grapevine than would fall within such a couple's budget as well.

Edit to add: It turns out that there are 25 active properties in Grapevine under $300k. Here are three nice ones that were on the first page of results:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateand...1_M77598-87760
http://www.realtor.com/realestateand...1_M85936-83661
http://www.realtor.com/realestateand...1_M87264-30543

That last one has just been reduced to $278k.
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Old 08-03-2016, 01:13 PM
 
9,907 posts, read 4,834,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
As someone looking to buy in the next few years, I certainly don't want to dish out thousands of dollars for a roof, AC, carpet/flooring, plumbing work, and foundation work right after moving in. So I can definitely understand the appeal of buying a new home.
Well, if you buy a 80 year old house like mine, it's on its third or fourth or fifth roof, second AC (first probably installed around 1975), all the steel pipe plumbing will have been replaced sometime in the 70s or 80s with copper, it'll have hardwood flooring that - with luck - hasn't been sanded to death and therefore will last longer than you will, and it's on pier and beam foundation that reached its final settled condition about 1945.

There's no reason to assume an older house is inherently due for expensive work, unless you buy one 20-25 years old with the original roof and all the original appliances, in which case yes, they are all about to reach the end of their useful life. So you negotiate an allowance in the purchase price, and if you can manage it you have all the work done before you move in.
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Old 08-03-2016, 01:37 PM
 
3,378 posts, read 2,468,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wittgenstein's Ghost View Post
I've never understood the fascination in DFW with new houses.
I wouldn't exactly call the house you've pictured "new." That home looks like it was built in the 80's.
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Old 08-03-2016, 01:43 PM
 
713 posts, read 614,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
As someone looking to buy in the next few years, I certainly don't want to dish out thousands of dollars for a roof, AC, carpet/flooring, plumbing work, and foundation work right after moving in. So I can definitely understand the appeal of buying a new home....

New houses with their plastic piping, https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/rele...-plumbing.html

and 'sawdust floor beams and roof sheathing' scare me; they scare firemen too, who won't dare go into a burning newer home for fear of collapse http://www.fireengineering.com/artic...t-killers.html

small leaks (or even high-humidity / ac condensation) can cause those beams to quickly soften and crumble . . ..

'older home' doesn't necessarily mean galvanized piping, iron sewer, cloth-wrapped power cables - educate yourself and you can get a great home with great 'bones' if you know what to look for.

ALL houses need to be maintained, which means updating/replacing hvac, flooring, roofs, windows, etc periodically; a NEW house only means you're starting with -0- on the clock, but that clock may run 'significantly faster' than a comparable older home that has been well maintained; for example - most new houses have the cheapest shingles installed; may barely last 10 years, and won't survive the first hailstorm; most people put better quality on older home when re-newing. Newer homes don't put calichie under the slab when building; they throw the 'post tension junk' right on top of whatever the bulldozer scraped up when clear-cutting the neighborhood.

More and more, newer homes are being built on 'junk' land that was long bypassed (due to potential flooding problems, nearby garbage dump or sewer plant, downwind of chemical/industrial areas, close to airports/freeways{noise}, etc). MOST people buying a NEW home errantly ASSUME somehow they're 'exempt' from these worries, and other worse one, - only to find out later AFTER the warranty 'expired' ; CAVEAT EMPTOR !!!

And GOOD LUCK finding ANY shade in the back-yard of a new home (less you got 30 years to wait!!!!, heh heh).

Last edited by oldoak2000; 08-03-2016 at 01:54 PM..
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Old 08-03-2016, 02:18 PM
 
4,536 posts, read 2,538,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katana49 View Post
I wouldn't exactly call the house you've pictured "new." That home looks like it was built in the 80's.
I consider a house built in the 80's "new-ish." Most houses that are even newer still exhibit most of the same architectural features, though.

Here's a very new house I just pulled a pic of from Realtor.com:



Very similar architectural features. More relevantly, however, most houses that neighbor the first pic I posted will look very similar to the first pic, and most houses that neighbor the second pic will look like the second pic. Such is reality when the differences arise from "choosing a floorplan."
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Old 08-03-2016, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Dallas
45 posts, read 63,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceraceae View Post
Older doesn't always mean better. It can and at times does, but there are certainly well built houses today.
I'm the biggest Dallas booster around but in Dallas... newer is worse, older is better. This is almost always a fact of life. Some of the apartment buildings that have gone up in the last five years have to be seen to be believed, and the houses aren't much better.
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