U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-03-2016, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Dallas
45 posts, read 63,900 times
Reputation: 71

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wittgenstein's Ghost View Post
I consider a house built in the 80's "new-ish." Most houses that are even newer still exhibit most of the same architectural features, though.

Here's a very new house I just pulled a pic of from Realtor.com:



Very similar architectural features. More relevantly, however, most houses that neighbor the first pic I posted will look very similar to the first pic, and most houses that neighbor the second pic will look like the second pic. Such is reality when the differences arise from "choosing a floorplan."
You're absolutely right. This is the aesthetic in almost all of the suburbs. It sells, so why change it?

If you want to see recent examples, take a Google Street View tour around Propser. The crazy angles are all the same; the only differences are stone instead of brick, and pale instead of red. Otherwise you're looking at the same as the 80s, and they're probably of **** construction too.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-03-2016, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Texas
44,257 posts, read 56,905,722 times
Reputation: 73543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewan View Post
I'm the biggest Dallas booster around but in Dallas... newer is worse, older is better. This is almost always a fact of life. Some of the apartment buildings that have gone up in the last five years have to be seen to be believed, and the houses aren't much better.
Agree.
I wouldn't and didn't touch high end new construction.
I don't like the look of it and our house built in the 80s looks WAY different than what they're building now.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2016, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Dallas
45 posts, read 63,900 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Agree.
I wouldn't and didn't touch high end new construction.
I don't like the look of it and our house built in the 80s looks WAY different than what they're building now.
It's sickening how bad it's gotten. I recently visited someone in a high-end apartment development in Uptown, less than three years old. No air conditioning in the hallways, the elevators were broken, you could hear the neighbors at any time of day or night... but people will pay for that address just to say that they've "made it". Would you walk away from a fool and his money? I don't even blame the real estate companies. The market will clearly bear the BS they throw up. Why shouldn't they build the bare minimum?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2016, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Texas
44,257 posts, read 56,905,722 times
Reputation: 73543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewan View Post
It's sickening how bad it's gotten. I recently visited someone in a high-end apartment development in Uptown, less than three years old. No air conditioning in the hallways, the elevators were broken, you could hear the neighbors at any time of day or night... but people will pay for that address just to say that they've "made it". Would you walk away from a fool and his money? I don't even blame the real estate companies. The market will clearly bear the BS they throw up. Why shouldn't they build the bare minimum?
My home was built 1987.
My parents' in 1983.

The stuff that is still original to the house looks and works great for the most part.
Any new work or remodel, etc, is already falling apart within 5 years.
Anything from appliances to tiles, etc.
[Work done by various different people who were happy to charge a lot of money.]
CONSISTENTLY.

This is not a coincidence.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2016, 10:51 PM
 
327 posts, read 241,879 times
Reputation: 403
So which new buildings are actually not cheap material?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2016, 06:20 AM
 
1,785 posts, read 2,179,428 times
Reputation: 1724
Our house was built in 2004. When we moved in 1.75 years ago it had original everything. We added to and changed the wood floors. Bought a quiet dishwasher. Negotiated a water heater when buying, but we haven't had any problems with new built things.

Any place I've ever lived had a dishwasher that sounded like an airplane taking off. We replaced this one even though it was working fine. It's been one of the best purchases we've ever made.

My wife bought a washer and dryer in 2009. We still use them today.

I love things like classic cars, so I'm not at all an old thing hater.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2016, 07:24 AM
 
3,383 posts, read 2,470,670 times
Reputation: 7049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeohnny View Post
So which new buildings are actually not cheap material?
There's no short answer to this. Newer buildings can be built to the same standards as an older home, but what you don't generally find anymore are custom touches. Most things are premade now, premade cabinets for a kitchen, bathrooms, etc. They were all made offsite, built to fit drawn up plans. That's fine in theory, but when something is done offsite, it may not actually fit or work when it's brought onsite. That can lead to some sloppy workmanship as the people onsite do what they can to make it work. Building a house in the old days, you actually had a carpenter in the house, building the cabinets right there.

But, a trade off is that newer homes are far more energy efficient, in both design and materials used. They have to be, it's required by law that they meet certain standards. Things like ductwork and insulation will always be better in a newer home. If anyone has ever lived in an old home with a fireplace, they've no doubt experienced backdraft when running the AC or furnace. That's because no thought was actually given to the airflow patterns in a home in relation to the ductwork.

That brings me to another point, fireplaces. In the before the 90's, if you bought a home you were getting an actual, brick fireplace. Solid construction, very safe, with the brick continuing on up through the attic and a full brick chimney. Now, you get a metal fireplace insert with sheet metal tubing, culminating in a simple metal spout poking out of the roof, or if buying an expensive home, a brick facade around it for a fake chimney.

This is both good and bad. The bad for new homes is that obviously thin metal is never going to be as substantial as a full brick fireplace.

The good is that it's a LOT cheaper, and also, is a lot less weight on the foundation of a home. In the DFW area, if you ever want to buy an older home built before the 90's, check out the fireplace, ESPECIALLY if it's at a corner of the house. With the clay soil we have around here, the foundation will always suffer the most at that location if proper watering hasn't been done over the life of the home. Cracked chimneys and slabs are very common due to this. With the metal insert fireplaces, the damage due to soil movement is much less.

Anyway, there's a lot of examples where newer is better. Knob and tube wiring anyone?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2016, 08:22 AM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,332 posts, read 3,935,155 times
Reputation: 4667
Based on what I'm reading in this thread, it seems it would be best to buy a home built in the 80s or 90s as they will have mostly modern ductwork, plumbing, and insulation, but be cheaper than a brand new home.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2016, 08:32 AM
 
3,682 posts, read 2,916,933 times
Reputation: 3284
Let's face it, DFW is building a whole lot of new residential homes and commercial buildings and there is a shortage of skilled workers and they charge more. Material is more expensive and land has gotten very expensive. Builders want to make significant profit so something has to give. They cut corners where buyers can't see it. Most buyers are interested in aesthetics and don't have any knowledge about construction.

For most part, most buyers don't care about location and construction as much as they do about superficial things to impress others.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2016, 08:34 AM
 
11,051 posts, read 11,098,003 times
Reputation: 10058
Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
Based on what I'm reading in this thread, it seems it would be best to buy a home built in the 80s or 90s as they will have mostly modern ductwork, plumbing, and insulation, but be cheaper than a brand new home.
It's just not that cut and dry. You've got to examine each home on its merits.


ETA - sorry I had to bail out earlier. You have to be somewhat careful and practice due diligence when looking.

Last edited by EDS_; 08-04-2016 at 08:56 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top