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Old 03-06-2008, 10:16 PM
 
287 posts, read 364,253 times
Reputation: 37

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I don't give a crapola about football. I know football is big in both places. I know quite a lot about Denver because I have lived here for a year. It is ok. But I wish it was more green, and lush. I also wish the landscape was more interesting. The mountains dovery little for me. They are nice to look at from a far. But that's about it.I amseriously considering Dallas. I often here that people LOVEliving in Dallas. What do they love about it? Is the terrainaround the city nice? Are the neighborhoods shady with trees? Do many sections of the city have an uglylook? There are areas of Denver that are very ugly. Commerce City isbrown, impoverished and industrial, for example. Thanks for your input.I expect to be moving once my current lease expires in May. Thanks again.

 
Old 03-07-2008, 06:45 AM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,825,721 times
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Have you ever been to Dallas?
 
Old 03-07-2008, 07:15 AM
 
335 posts, read 887,724 times
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While the Rocky Mountain "front-range", which of course is just west of Denver and runs north and south of the metro area, is majestic, spectacular, and beautiful country in our most mountanous of all the mountain states, much of eastern Colorado is a lot like N.Texas. And of course the eastern suburbs of Denver now extend into this praire country.
So the treeless, empty praire country you have in eastern CO, while at a much higher elevation of course than TX, is similar to N.Texas. But of course
you have 'burbs to the west like Golden and even Lakewood that are into or
very close to the RM foothills while N.Texas has very little variation in terms of topography. In other words its really pretty dang monotonous looking.
But N.Texas has a pretty good climate. Lot of heat and humidity but not as bad as coastal Texas (Houston) in the summer months, while unlike Denver
you will enjoy the winters which are pretty comfortable except for those nasty ice storms. But unlike Denver, not a true 4 seasons climate.
Oh here's one big irony about the 2 places. "J.R." is probably more prominent
in Denver than Dallas. Yep, Energy may be a bigger component of the Denver
economy than in Dallas because of it being the capital of Nat-Gas in the RM region. You will learn as I did from living in TX that there's vast differences berween the "legend" of Dallas & the "reality" of Dallas.
But Dallas has a lot to offer, though I would no doubt personally choose Denver of the 2 but then it is one of my very favorite cities.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 09:54 AM
 
2,231 posts, read 5,414,955 times
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Just on the basis of size, and the number of cultural and entertainment options (and job opportunities, sports, etc), comparing Denver to Dallas is like comparing Dallas to LA.

The Dallas area is wetter and greener than the plains around Denver. Denver is in the same climate region as Lubbock and Amarillo.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 11:49 AM
 
2,531 posts, read 5,450,992 times
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Denver may be smaller than the Metroplex (I think 2.9 Million or so live in Boulder-Denver metro vs. 6 Million in DFW), BUT it serves as the anchor for the region, being the only major city for many, many, many miles. The closest major cities to Denver are Salt Lake (512 miles away) and Kansas City (615 miles away), so Denver serves as the cultural regional and employment center for the Rocky Mountain states. The closest major city to DFW, Houston is a mere 240 miles away to compare.

Not to mention it's a major transportation hub (being halfway between the West Coast and the Midwest) and center for telecommunications. So, yeah, smaller, but no backwater either.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 08:40 PM
 
287 posts, read 364,253 times
Reputation: 37
to answer Far North Dallas' question, no I have never really been to Dallas. I have beenthrough it at night many times as a trucker, and the skyline is very impressive. I have never considered the comparison of the Eastern plains of Colorado and North Texas.I have been as far east as Salina, KS, along I-70, and I have noticed that onceI get this far East there are many patches of woods. The landscape is muchmore woodsy than it is further West on the Plains. Salina and Dallas are on thesame longitude, so this is why I figured Dallas and the surrounding landscape wouldbe much more wooded than the Plains outside of Denver.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 09:07 PM
 
2,231 posts, read 5,414,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backspace View Post
to answer Far North Dallas' question, no I have never really been to Dallas. I have beenthrough it at night many times as a trucker, and the skyline is very impressive. I have never considered the comparison of the Eastern plains of Colorado and North Texas.I have been as far east as Salina, KS, along I-70, and I have noticed that onceI get this far East there are many patches of woods. The landscape is muchmore woodsy than it is further West on the Plains. Salina and Dallas are on thesame longitude, so this is why I figured Dallas and the surrounding landscape wouldbe much more wooded than the Plains outside of Denver.
The Dallas countryside is partially wooded, especially along streams and rivers, and near bodies of water. And there are many bodies of water, anywhere from small ponds to large lakes of 40,000 acres.

Portions of the Dallas-Fort Worth area are very heavily wooded. The Cross Timbers region, a long narrow forest that bisects the DFW area, was named because of the difficulty of crossing through it. The forest was actually a barrier that protected the local native American tribe from the marauding Comanches and Kiowas to the west.

The Oak Cliff area of Dallas is heavily wooded by natural growth timber, and the Cedar Hills area on its western boundary is steep and rugged, as it descends to the Arlington-Grand Prairie plain. It is actually an escarpment, a sheer drop of 200-300 feet.

Hope this helps to distinguish Denver from Dallas.
 
Old 03-08-2008, 12:25 AM
 
287 posts, read 364,253 times
Reputation: 37
Yes, thanks. I doubt we have anything like this in Denver.
 
Old 03-08-2008, 07:24 AM
 
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Its hard to compare the two. It really is apples and oranges. Denver has its good and bad points and so does Dallas. I just moved from Colorado springs, not Denver but still Colorado. I suppose it depends on what type of recreational activities you are into.

Do not believe the hype that Dallas is an inexpensive city to live in. It is just as expensive if not more than most normal places. The exceptions are places like California or New York which really are not comparisons with Dallas.
 
Old 03-08-2008, 01:44 PM
 
15 posts, read 44,995 times
Reputation: 14
Does Sonic exist in Denver? That would be my first question.
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