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Old 05-22-2018, 11:57 AM
 
3,691 posts, read 5,611,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbdwihdh378y9 View Post
There's a lot more to the relevant science than comparing dew points. You can't compare dew points and draw any conclusions about relative comfort. You need more information.
No kidding, I was making a simplified point. If you want to get into more detail, there is plenty of data out there that contradicts your claim.

Statistically speaking, it's just not true that GSP is significantly more hot/humid feeling than DFW. And absolutely zero truth to a 13 degree separation in terms of comfort after taking humidity into account as you have indicated. It really depends on how you look at it , but specifically when you look at Heat Index (which I don't always agree with but it is a widely accumulated statistic that combines temperature and humidity) DFW beats out GSP easily every year. Even looking at ASHRAE dehumidification data and associated bin weather data, there is no data to support your claim.

I can't refute what you feel because that's just you. I find Dallas to feel hotter (though plenty bearable - i've done 3 summers here and it's not bad) than GSP even after living in GSP for 9 years. But that's just our personal perception. Best case for your argument, they're comparable (if you adjust dry bulb temperatures to normalize on RH, they're usually within 2-3 degrees of each other, not 13). Worst case if you rely on heat index, DFW overall feels warmer than GSP.

Last edited by Sunbather; 05-22-2018 at 12:13 PM..
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Old 05-22-2018, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Arlington, TX
422 posts, read 395,916 times
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I’m not gonna get into all the science stuff regarding temps like y’all, but one anecdotal piece of evidence that seems true to people I’ve spoken too, is the Texas sun is a lot more intense. It feels like you’ll melt in the Texas sun, I hardly ever felt that way in SC
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Old 05-23-2018, 03:29 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,338 times
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Thanks for responding. I will be visiting Greenville during the summer to get a real feel for the city.
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Old 05-25-2018, 02:12 PM
 
12,615 posts, read 3,723,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiecta View Post
No kidding, I was making a simplified point. If you want to get into more detail, there is plenty of data out there that contradicts your claim.

Statistically speaking, it's just not true that GSP is significantly more hot/humid feeling than DFW.
That's the point. The "statistics" don't match the reality, so there is something wrong with the statistics. Greenville is WAY more humid feeling than Dallas, although you're right that there is room for subjectivity.
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Old 05-29-2018, 07:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbdwihdh378y9 View Post
That's the point. The "statistics" don't match the reality, so there is something wrong with the statistics. Greenville is WAY more humid feeling than Dallas, although you're right that there is room for subjectivity.
I don't know what to tell you if you think the statistics are false and your perception is the reality.

The statistics are based on decades and decades of cataloged scientific data that I (and lots of other professionals) rely on for our jobs. If the statistics were inaccurate it would be quite a let down to scientists and engineers that utilize this data. Luckily that is not the case.

The statistics are the reality. Human comfort and perception/sensitivity to hot/cold/humidity will vary some from person to person. That's what you're feeling. Just because you perceive Greenville to be way more humid than Dallas, doesn't invalidate the actual scientific data.
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Old 05-29-2018, 03:52 PM
 
12,615 posts, read 3,723,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiecta View Post
I don't know what to tell you if you think the statistics are false and your perception is the reality.

The statistics are based on decades and decades of cataloged scientific data that I (and lots of other professionals) rely on for our jobs. If the statistics were inaccurate it would be quite a let down to scientists and engineers that utilize this data. Luckily that is not the case.

The statistics are the reality. Human comfort and perception/sensitivity to hot/cold/humidity will vary some from person to person. That's what you're feeling. Just because you perceive Greenville to be way more humid than Dallas, doesn't invalidate the actual scientific data.
You haven't referred to any scientific data. Or statistics.

The actual scientific data, if you ever presented any, would (1) confirm my observation that Greenville is far more humid, as that term is used by lay people, than Dallas or (2) confirm that no objective measurement of comfortableness is possible. It can't possibly support your claim that Greenville is objectively less humid (in lay terms) or more comfortable than Dallas, because that claim is false.

Last edited by hbdwihdh378y9; 05-29-2018 at 04:20 PM..
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Old 05-30-2018, 07:55 AM
 
3,691 posts, read 5,611,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbdwihdh378y9 View Post
You haven't referred to any scientific data. Or statistics.

The actual scientific data, if you ever presented any, would (1) confirm my observation that Greenville is far more humid, as that term is used by lay people, than Dallas or (2) confirm that no objective measurement of comfortableness is possible. It can't possibly support your claim that Greenville is objectively less humid (in lay terms) or more comfortable than Dallas, because that claim is false.
You realize how thin this argument is right? Everything I've mentioned in regard to dew point, RH, dry bulb temperatures, and heat index is coming directly from official climactic weather data (noaa, ASHRAE, etc.)... However, as soon as I brought that up, you immediately said not to bring the scientific data into this. And now you're saying I didn't bring any scientific data into this. So which is it?

So no, it would not confirm your observation because I've already stated that this data confirms something else.

Additionally, I never said that definitively Greenville was objectively more comfortable than Dallas. In fact I also stated directly that 'comfortableness' is subjective and people are going to experience things differently. Within a statistical variation you can determine what the majority of people will find comfortable, but that's about it.

But it is an easily, scientifically verifiable statement that the absolute humidity in Greenville, SC is not statistically 'far more humid' than Dallas. I get paid a good amount of money to work with this exact kind of data for a living. And I have personally done this work both in Greenville, SC and now Dallas, TX for the majority of my career. I'm not going to argue over whether you personally find Greenville to feel more humid. But in terms of objective science, DAL and GSP are very similar. Dallas has more moisture in the air (absolute humidity) while Greenville tends to have a *slightly* higher relative humidity. But only by a small margin when looking at average climactic data. It's nearly a wash in terms of what the average person would feel when asking to compare the two humidity-wise.
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:06 AM
 
8,790 posts, read 4,071,631 times
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Oh for crying out loud!

It gets damn hot in Dallas and Austin both.

I've not been there but I bet it gets damn hot in South Carolina too.

Just stop arguing over exactly how many angels can dance on the point of that pin. No one else cares.
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:38 AM
 
3,691 posts, read 5,611,174 times
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Sorry, but I care because I dislike the current culture where people hold what they 'believe' or 'perceive' to be true over scientific data. That's not the same as debating over how many angels can dance on the point of a pin. We're adults - if one person claims something factually incorrect, another adult can correct them. That's how it works.



A plot that represents the 98%, 99%, and 99.6% design weather points for the 8,760 hours of the year (in layman terms - only 0.4% of the hours in any of these locations get more humid than what is shown) for Greenville, Dallas, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Houston, NOLA, and Charleston in regard to annualized dew point and corresponding dry bulb temperatures in these locations (thus supplying us with the corresponding absolute and relative humidities as well). In no way could someone defend the stance that Greenville is statistically 'far more humid' than Dallas. I supplied a range of points from various cities to really drive home where humid cities and dry cities land on this chart in terms of providing scale between the DAL and GSP data. Exactly as I stated before: they're comparable, with Dallas having slightly more moisture in the air on average. But neither are as humid as HOU, NOLA, or CHS.

All weather data points pulled from the ASHRAE Climactic Design Conditions statistical weather data - 2017 edition.

Last edited by Sunbather; 05-30-2018 at 09:05 AM..
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Old 06-12-2018, 05:32 PM
 
1 posts, read 370 times
Reputation: 10
I too moved to TX from South Carolina, about 4 years ago. Having lived in dallas the entire time but visited Austin frequently, I would hands down suggest move to Austin over Dallas (if scenery is high on your priority list). I would say on a scale of 1-10 (10 being good) outdoor activity do in Dallas it ranks 2. Austin has far more to do and seems easier to find a sense of community.
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