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Old 07-08-2019, 09:52 AM
 
1,372 posts, read 750,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redlionjr View Post
Yeah I definitely see that with Chicago. I've been a couple of times to visit family and my experiences are always different with the city and always depends on what part or neighborhood were in. I honestly had Chicago on our list of places to move. I really liked Oak Park. Chicago has the perfect mixture of walkable, world class amenities, public transportation yet still somewhat affordable in comparison to LA or NY. But I won't lie, i'm a southern cat so I can't do 9 months of cold weather. That alone had me looking the other way even more so than the reputation. But you have to really do your research on where you want to stay in Chicago. REALLY RESEARCH. But I do like Chicago.



EXACTLY! Dallas is not a bad city at all and even though the social scene is not as in your face as Houston, DC or Atlanta at least imo socially it still offers more than other places for you to have something to get into on a daily or weekly basis. Which is why I specifically stated I feel as though DFW offers more progressive options for Black Families than it's southern counterpart. For people looking for that family friendly atmosphere or more options for predominately black schools that are highly rated DFW just has more. Those are facts.

Houston has majority-black areas but like you stated those communities that are adjacent to good predominately black public schools or atleast with a good percentage of black students to teacher ratio are fewer. And more than likely in my case as a family man you still more than likely will have to go outside the loop if you want that combination.

And even when it comes to other cities DFW size it's really only 3 cities people consistently compare it to as being a better option for Black people. Not saying it's only 3 cities better than but not every Black person in America is looking to move to DC,Houston, or Atlanta. Some people might just want that more laid back vibe. There are much more less appealing major cities DFW size for Black people than it is better options for the Black experience in America.
This last part of your post is very poignant - as far as big cities DFW is far better than most other big metros imo. For the average black person/family, places like Boston (as a very notable example), Seattle, and even the Bay Area or LA generally don't offer as much. It's a very good place for black people of all stripes.

But I will say the school thing is the biggest difference. In Houston, the best schools for black kids tend to have mixed demographics. This is true in DFW as well, but to a bit of a lesser extent. Additionally, DISD is probably a better overall urban school district than HISD at this point, especially with all of the school board issues that HISD has had to deal with lately. DISD has really done some good things in some very disadvantaged areas and HISD has had some trouble replicating that success lately in my view.

There are a ton of successful black families in Houston who have had their kids attend good schools and be successful, but I do agree the path to doing that might a little easier in DFW.
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Old 07-08-2019, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles-Houston-DFW
2,180 posts, read 1,169,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Clutch View Post
This last part of your post is very poignant - as far as big cities DFW is far better than most other big metros imo. For the average black person/family, places like Boston (as a very notable example), Seattle, and even the Bay Area or LA generally don't offer as much. It's a very good place for black people of all stripes.

But I will say the school thing is the biggest difference. In Houston, the best schools for black kids tend to have mixed demographics. This is true in DFW as well, but to a bit of a lesser extent. Additionally, DISD is probably a better overall urban school district than HISD at this point, especially with all of the school board issues that HISD has had to deal with lately. DISD has really done some good things in some very disadvantaged areas and HISD has had some trouble replicating that success lately in my view.

There are a ton of successful black families in Houston who have had their kids attend good schools and be successful, but I do agree the path to doing that might a little easier in DFW.
This is all true but Black families aren't moving into DISD like that. Black families new to DFW pretty much all go to the northern suburbs, while native DFW Black families are more likely to move somewhere south of I-20 or Arlington/Grand Prairie from what I've seen (where the schools are just average and comparable to similar areas in Houston). I agree though that DISD has done great things. Houston ISD being so expansive in coverage area definitely hurts it there, while DISD is more contained. Problem areas within HISD are spread around separate districts in DFW (think Mesquite, North GP, Duncanville, etc.), making it easier to manage.

In general, Houston area districts cover too much area. Along with HISD, Cy Fair ISD (especially!), Conroe ISD, Fort Bend ISD, etc., should be broken up into smaller districts. Still I think the trends with school scores have already began to for Houston.
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Houston(Screwston),TX
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Quote:
This isn't as true anymore. The southern Dallas County suburbs, outside of Cedar Hill and most of DeSoto, are not desirable. Lancaster and Duncanville have a few okay to nice neighborhoods, but overall not the preferred cities at all and the school scores reflect that. South Grand Prairie has a lot of Blacks too, but again the schools are just average. Don't need to get into Mesquite or Balch Springs. The Arlington schools are poor performing to barely average outside of its favored SW quadrant. On the Fort Worth side, Crowley, Everman, etc. are all poor performing.
When I was speaking highly of the Southern Dallas burbs I was really speaking on Cedar Hill and Desoto. Lancaster was on a downward spiral when I use to visit Dallas every other weekend many many years ago. I can only imagine it being not so desirable now. And like you said Duncanville has a few nice neighborhoods. But again Cedar Hill or Desoto are more for Black families looking to just settle down. Or more so people who are pretty familiar with that area. I have family that's been living in Desoto and Cedar Hill since the early 90's so it's a lot of "old established money" there. Now Desoto and Cedar Hill have some poor public schools. But one thing that I do love about Cedar Hill is the Cedar Hill Collegiate Academy and their high school. One of the best middle/high school's in the state. So there's always that option. As far as Grand Prairie they have some great schools zone to Mansfield ISD with a large percentage of Black students and a well diverse student body and teacher staff. Grand Prairie ISD not so much but the option to go to Mansfield ISD and be in a area such as Mira Lagos/Grand Peninsula is a huge draw for me and my wife. I'm not even interested in Arlington or Ft.Worth because the poor schools to be honest.

Quote:
I also think you're really cutting Houston short with regard to the Black population in its suburbs. There have been huge increases in the Black population in the desirable suburbs from Pearland to Sugar Land/Missouri City to unincorporated Richmond, to South Katy, and now South Cypress. These areas generally have good to great schools too, outside of some areas sprinkled in between like North Katy but even North Katy is just average and is getting much better. Other sides like the NE suburbs have seen increases too, but the school scores still remain on the lower side.
I want to make this clear, I really really like living in Houston. We still have staying in Houston as a option. We're just stacking up the pros and cons of each city on our "list" and seeing which one works best for us. The areas in Pearland zoned to Alvin ISD and Richmond/Sugar Land are on the top of our list of areas to move to. I know they have great schools with a large perentage of Black students in those particular areas and are also very evenly diverse which is an important factor for us in choosing a school for our child. And that diversity is reflective in the school staff. Those areas have a lot to offer for Black families and are on par with areas like Grand Prairie/Mansfield area. So i'm not disputing that since those are highly favorable in my personal opinion. As far as Mo City, they got a lot of poor schools as well. A lot of nice communities but it doesn't really translate to their public schools. Matter fact their 2 highest rated schools happen to be 2 elementary schools that are predominately white.

As far as Cypress, I know they have a lot of good schools but it's still a predominately White area and that's not changing anytime soon. Still heavily conservative at that and when you see stories like this:

https://www.chron.com/houston/articl...photo-15653909

Than it furthers let's you know who still runs the show in that district no matter how many Black people are moving in that area. Plus I know some people that have kids that attend other schools in Cy-Fair or have worked with Cy-Fair and while it's not overwhelmingly racist, I do hear rumblings or covert discrimination on some level every now and then. I've been in Houston long enough plus my wife is a Houstonian and I have lots of family all over the city so i'm very well ingrained in the landscape of Houston and it's academic politics.

Quote:
Dallas is a great city for Blacks but you're selling the others short, especially Houston. DFW is in the best economic times ever so it's attracting people from all backgrounds. Many are just looking for an opportunity somewhere. I believe this is what's increasing the ratchetness level in DFW, which has really gone up in recent years. Some of that stuff you're trying to escape from Houston, or imply Atlanta has, is appearing all over DFW, meanwhile it appears Houston is cooling off there. The areas in DFW I used to stay in are not the same. I have a friend who lives in a nice "urban style" apartment complex in the Mid-Cities area, and the people who lived there were... less than desirable. It's a great example of not judging a book by it's cover because on the outside you'd think this was a very nice complex. Heck someone stole some of the dumbbells from the weight room so they had to install cameras inside.
I don't see how i'm selling others short when I stated Atlanta would probably be our first choice at least as of NOW. I'm also not selling Houston short because again I do think it offers more on a social level than DFW as a whole for Black people and that it is still a great city for Black people to prosper in. If we do decide to move out of Houston it has nothing to do with the black experience and more to do with the economy and career path in our specific fields. Only thing i'm trying to "escape" in Houston is the flooding, horrible traffic,air quality(bad on my asthma), and the fact my employer in Dallas pays more. But again Houston is not a bad place. I'm critical of all cities but that doesn't mean i'm not fans of the same cities I criticize as well. So I think you might have misinterpreted my post. And the ratchetness popping up in places they haven't before is by design.

That's pretty much happening in most major cities in America including Houston. Because of higher cost of living and gentrification people are being misplaced and forced to move to the outer skirts and suburbs. Sometimes it's some less than desirable people in that misplaced population. I remember a time when Spring was a generally safe suburb. Crime is more of a reoccurring theme in Spring now. If i'm not mistaken homicides have gone up in Houston as well. I know Dallas has a had a crazy year so far but Houston is experiencing an uptick in homicides as well. Don't get me started on these road rage incidents that seem to go down almost every week in the city. But crime is an ongoing issue in both major cities.
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Old 07-11-2019, 05:43 AM
 
39 posts, read 15,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dolphin99 View Post
I grew up here and I hate DFW.
To understand why, all you need to understand is that it's not small or easy to live in, nor does it have culture, nature, or a sense of place. It's a giant suburban "big ass nowhere". All the whites are rednecks, all the immigrants are uppity strivers. You live in a big overpriced house, drive your big overpriced car to your crap job, and numb the pain on the weekend by going shopping. And that's all it is, forever.
That's a hilarious dark side overgeneralization of DFW. I can sympathize coming from someone who grew up here. Every metro has its issues. I've been here 10 years - I feel your pain. You should spend a few years traveling - you deserve it.
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Old 07-11-2019, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Lancaster, TX
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As one of the few Dallas forum posters living in the southern suburbs, I'll speak up. (My apologies in advance for the long-winded commentary )

Quote:
Originally Posted by DabOnEm View Post
This isn't as true anymore. The southern Dallas County suburbs, outside of Cedar Hill and most of DeSoto, are not desirable. Lancaster and Duncanville have a few okay to nice neighborhoods, but overall not the preferred cities at all and the school scores reflect that. South Grand Prairie has a lot of Blacks too, but again the schools are just average. Don't need to get into Mesquite or Balch Springs. The Arlington schools are poor performing to barely average outside of its favored SW quadrant. On the Fort Worth side, Crowley, Everman, etc. are all poor performing.
To start, desirability is a highly subjective measure that varies widely from person to person and family to family. It all comes down to personal preferences in the end. Are they viewed as "desirable" in this forum? For the most part, no. As a whole, the southern suburbs (and southern DFW) tend to be looked down upon here and are often judged collectively rather than individually. When other areas are discussed, the "good" and "not so good" areas are defined in great detail. That's not the case with southern Dallas County. I can't count the times that I've had to explain that the South Dallas neighborhood, areas of Dallas south of the Trinity River, and the southern suburbs are separate entities and there are distinct differences that exist between and within each of the three groups.

Cedar Hill and DeSoto are certainly nice places to live. Demographically, they are a mix of middle and upper-middle class residents. Lancaster and Duncanville are generally middle class with a larger working-class presence and fewer high-end neighborhoods than the other two, which lessens their "desirability," but both have attractive, well-kept neighborhoods as well.

Area school districts get broad-brushed and "written off" with little regard for individual school performance (particularly at the elementary and middle school levels), specialty programs offered (gifted/talented, special education, AP, IB, etc.), and so on. Cedar Hill's K-12 Collegiate Academies, DeSoto's magnet programs, and Lancaster's district wide STEM curriculum and K-12 IB program aren't talked about that much, but should be. Motivated students who value education with strong parental backing will be successful no matter what school they attend. I received a great education in DeSoto and the schools were high performing when my brother and I were students.

At the moment, DeSoto is the lowest performing district academically and there have been leadership and fiscal management issues over the past year that hurt its reputation. However, the district isn't a lost cause and hopefully the current hiccups will be properly addressed. Cedar Hill and Lancaster schools have not encountered the same performance issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Redlionjr View Post
When I was speaking highly of the Southern Dallas burbs I was really speaking on Cedar Hill and Desoto. Lancaster was on a downward spiral when I use to visit Dallas every other weekend many many years ago. I can only imagine it being not so desirable now. And like you said Duncanville has a few nice neighborhoods. But again Cedar Hill or Desoto are more for Black families looking to just settle down. Or more so people who are pretty familiar with that area. I have family that's been living in Desoto and Cedar Hill since the early 90's so it's a lot of "old established money" there. Now Desoto and Cedar Hill have some poor public schools. But one thing that I do love about Cedar Hill is the Cedar Hill Collegiate Academy and their high school. One of the best middle/high school's in the state. So there's always that option. As far as Grand Prairie they have some great schools zone to Mansfield ISD with a large percentage of Black students and a well diverse student body and teacher staff. Grand Prairie ISD not so much but the option to go to Mansfield ISD and be in a area such as Mira Lagos/Grand Peninsula is a huge draw for me and my wife. I'm not even interested in Arlington or Ft.Worth because the poor schools to be honest.
I'm not sure how long ago you were in Lancaster, but November marks my 13th year as a city resident. Right now, I would describe the city as "stable." For a place that has dealt with numerous setbacks not of its own making - economic downturn/housing bust, closure of a large hospital (since reopened), and a tornado in 2012 to name a few, Lancaster has been quite resilient. Lancaster ISD has improved and it classified by the state as a "fast growing" district due to increased enrollment. Two new elementary campuses were completed and a new middle school is under construction. The level of commercial development and business interest that has occurred in recent years would have been unheard of 12 years ago, when I began posting on City-Data. Its not perfect, no place is, but it is doing well.
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Old 07-11-2019, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Houston(Screwston),TX
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Quote:
I'm not sure how long ago you were in Lancaster, but November marks my 13th year as a city resident. Right now, I would describe the city as "stable." For a place that has dealt with numerous setbacks not of its own making - economic downturn/housing bust, closure of a large hospital (since reopened), and a tornado in 2012 to name a few, Lancaster has been quite resilient. Lancaster ISD has improved and it classified by the state as a "fast growing" district due to increased enrollment. Two new elementary campuses were completed and a new middle school is under construction. The level of commercial development and business interest that has occurred in recent years would have been unheard of 12 years ago, when I began posting on City-Data. Its not perfect, no place is, but it is doing well.
To be fair I haven't been to Lancaster in a couple of years. But great post especially coming from someone who lives in the Southern suburbs. It definitely get's a bad rap on City Data and I think I know why but I guess we can save that topic for another day.
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Old 07-11-2019, 06:35 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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I think I am one of the few on here to say I love Dallas. I get the impression that most people on this forum don't live in Dallas. Therefore, wherever they live, they will consider as being "better" than other cities (i.e. Dallas). If you are a Dallasite and you don't like the city, I hope you will be able to move somewhere one day that will make you happy.

Dallas is great to me because:
The shopping, dining, and entertainment are great. The public school system maybe not ranked the best in DFW, but DISD has done a good job educating a student population that is majority low income. The abundance of private schools and magnet schools cannot be matched. I love the culture and diversity. I love the variety of neighborhoods and that the houses look different from each other. I love being close to airports. I also love the downtown skyline.

I understand that city life is not for everyone, as the suburb life is not for me. Not one is better than the other. It's a matter of preference and what makes you happy. Dallas checks all of my boxes which makes Dallas the best city in DFW for me!
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Old 07-12-2019, 05:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
I'd say it's "average" having worked in Chicago and Orlando. It's also hard to judge because many DFW whites aren't even from Texas. We have a ton of California and mid-west transplants and I honestly think the non-natives bring their own racial baggage. In my experience, the whites that give you 'side-eye' are usually from highly segregated communities outside of the South. Southern, native whites are pretty well accustomed to seeing black faces everywhere but those from up North or even mostly white rural states like OK, WV, KY etc, might get that "what are you doing here" look on their faces. Experienced this in a job interview at age 21. The hiring manager acted and sounded like the biggest hick I've ever seen, but I learned he was from Illinois (Ill State grad too).

We don't have a lot of overt racism. I think it's a mixture of covert prejudice combined with blacks just feeling uncomfortable in mostly white spaces. My first elementary school was almost entirely comprised of Mexican-born ESL students. My second was probably 60% white. Middle school was 40/40/20 white/black/Latino & Asian and high school was maybe 50% white and 30% black. Most black Dallasites probably have situations similar to mine, so it's not that strange to go from being the Token Black to being surrounded by blacks.

I think most blacks from other parts of the country aren't used to having that kind of racial fluidity on a daily basis and it can come as a shock. This is especially true of the educated/upwardly mobile set because they struggle to find other like-minded blacks. Their peers are just more spread out and it's harder to build those connections.
A lot of these racist transplants live in Collin County. I encountered a lot of them in the Allen area. It is not only transplants that are racist. Of all the other minorities I've had interactions with, I've definitely felt the most racist vibes from Indians, Asians and Middle Eastern people in this area. Many of the Mexicans and Whites who were born and raised in TX are also racist and unfriendly toward me.
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Old 07-15-2019, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles-Houston-DFW
2,180 posts, read 1,169,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acntx View Post
I'm not sure how long ago you were in Lancaster, but November marks my 13th year as a city resident. Right now, I would describe the city as "stable." For a place that has dealt with numerous setbacks not of its own making - economic downturn/housing bust, closure of a large hospital (since reopened), and a tornado in 2012 to name a few, Lancaster has been quite resilient. Lancaster ISD has improved and it classified by the state as a "fast growing" district due to increased enrollment. Two new elementary campuses were completed and a new middle school is under construction. The level of commercial development and business interest that has occurred in recent years would have been unheard of 12 years ago, when I began posting on City-Data. Its not perfect, no place is, but it is doing well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redlionjr View Post
To be fair I haven't been to Lancaster in a couple of years. But great post especially coming from someone who lives in the Southern suburbs. It definitely get's a bad rap on City Data and I think I know why but I guess we can save that topic for another day.
I have had family who've lived in Lancaster since the early 00s and I have been through there more times than I can count. The reason why you imply it isn't desirable is certainly a subconscious reason for some people who choose the north, but the largest reason why it's not as desirable is because it isn't close to high paying, white collar jobs (unless in Downtown Dallas) and the school scores aren't as high. Those are pretty legit reasons in my opinion.

Southern DFW clearly has the best geographic features of the Metroplex, so it's a wonder why there aren't more homes lining some of the large hills down there versus the rolling prairie of the north side.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acntx View Post
As one of the few Dallas forum posters living in the southern suburbs, I'll speak up. (My apologies in advance for the long-winded commentary )

To start, desirability is a highly subjective measure that varies widely from person to person and family to family. It all comes down to personal preferences in the end. Are they viewed as "desirable" in this forum? For the most part, no. As a whole, the southern suburbs (and southern DFW) tend to be looked down upon here and are often judged collectively rather than individually. When other areas are discussed, the "good" and "not so good" areas are defined in great detail. That's not the case with southern Dallas County. I can't count the times that I've had to explain that the South Dallas neighborhood, areas of Dallas south of the Trinity River, and the southern suburbs are separate entities and there are distinct differences that exist between and within each of the three groups.

Cedar Hill and DeSoto are certainly nice places to live. Demographically, they are a mix of middle and upper-middle class residents. Lancaster and Duncanville are generally middle class with a larger working-class presence and fewer high-end neighborhoods than the other two, which lessens their "desirability," but both have attractive, well-kept neighborhoods as well.

Area school districts get broad-brushed and "written off" with little regard for individual school performance (particularly at the elementary and middle school levels), specialty programs offered (gifted/talented, special education, AP, IB, etc.), and so on. Cedar Hill's K-12 Collegiate Academies, DeSoto's magnet programs, and Lancaster's district wide STEM curriculum and K-12 IB program aren't talked about that much, but should be. Motivated students who value education with strong parental backing will be successful no matter what school they attend. I received a great education in DeSoto and the schools were high performing when my brother and I were students.

At the moment, DeSoto is the lowest performing district academically and there have been leadership and fiscal management issues over the past year that hurt its reputation. However, the district isn't a lost cause and hopefully the current hiccups will be properly addressed. Cedar Hill and Lancaster schools have not encountered the same performance issues.
These are all very good points. I've had family in DeSoto and Lancaster for almost two decades now. I always liked DeSoto a little more since there were larger hills and my uncle has an awesome house on almost an acre. From what I saw and experienced in Lancaster... it was like the new suburban extension of South Dallas. I know not all of Lancaster is like this, but unfortunately many parts are. It's growing now because it's on the cheaper side and people are escaping southern Dallas. It's not growing for the same reasons some other cities are around DFW (proximity to well paying jobs and schools).

Of course everyone's viewpoint will vary but I've experienced enough on this side of the area while living in DFW, so I'm not pulling this out of nowhere. Heck as I speak my other family member in Lancaster is in the process of putting the house up for rent so they can move elsewhere. Not trying to throw shade at your town because there are definitely nice parts.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Lancaster, TX
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Originally Posted by DabOnEm View Post
I have had family who've lived in Lancaster since the early 00s and I have been through there more times than I can count. The reason why you imply it isn't desirable is certainly a subconscious reason for some people who choose the north, but the largest reason why it's not as desirable is because it isn't close to high paying, white collar jobs (unless in Downtown Dallas) and the school scores aren't as high. Those are pretty legit reasons in my opinion.

Southern DFW clearly has the best geographic features of the Metroplex, so it's a wonder why there aren't more homes lining some of the large hills down there versus the rolling prairie of the north side.

These are all very good points. I've had family in DeSoto and Lancaster for almost two decades now. I always liked DeSoto a little more since there were larger hills and my uncle has an awesome house on almost an acre. From what I saw and experienced in Lancaster... it was like the new suburban extension of South Dallas. I know not all of Lancaster is like this, but unfortunately many parts are. It's growing now because it's on the cheaper side and people are escaping southern Dallas. It's not growing for the same reasons some other cities are around DFW (proximity to well paying jobs and schools).

Of course everyone's viewpoint will vary but I've experienced enough on this side of the area while living in DFW, so I'm not pulling this out of nowhere. Heck as I speak my other family member in Lancaster is in the process of putting the house up for rent so they can move elsewhere. Not trying to throw shade at your town because there are definitely nice parts.
Regarding Lancaster, it certainly has neighborhoods that aren't as nice as the others. Its no different than other communities in that regard with variations in neighborhood quality and appearance. Since the population increased by nearly 50 percent since 2000, a sizable portion of the housing stock and neighborhoods are newer, typical DFW-style suburban subdivisions that are generally well maintained.

I've been a poster in the Dallas Forum since 2007 and the "extension of South/Southern Dallas" label gets applied to Cedar Hill, DeSoto, Duncanville, and Lancaster from time to time and it is often used as a catch-all term that discounts the significant differences in demographics, delivery of city services, outside investment, development potential, and overall perceptions that exist between areas. Not accusing you of doing so, I'm just explaining what I've encountered in the past. None of the suburbs are saddled with the history of neglect, extreme poverty, and disinvestment found in the South Dallas neighborhood or in pockets throughout the southern sector.

I'm not disputing that people from southern Dallas are choosing to move into Lancaster and the other southern suburbs. My family was one of them. They lived in the Highland Hills neighborhood of Dallas and moved to the southern suburbs when I was two years old in the late 1980s. We lived in a duplex first, then an apartment. It wasn't fancy, but decent, safe, and offered a better environment than Highland Hills. That type of working and middle-class flight from southern Dallas to other areas has been going on for nearly 30 years now and those with the means to leave have continued to do so. The southern suburbs, however, have managed to retain a significant middle-class base, where much of the southern sector of Dallas hasn't. As a result, it is much easier to attract new residents, businesses and development to the suburbs, while areas of the city proper lack even the most basic of amenities. The southern suburbs do receive transplants as well, nothing close to Collin/Denton county numbers, but some nonetheless. You are right that the suburbs south and east of Dallas are typically more affordable than the northern suburbs. This has been true for years, regardless of prevailing economic conditions. That said, they are less affordable today and haven't escaped the rising prices and increasing property values found elsewhere. Entry into a basic suburban starter home neighborhood will cost substantially more than it did five or ten years ago.

You are also correct that there aren't as many white collar jobs south or east of Dallas, but some are present and many who work downtown choose the southern suburbs because they provide an easier, less congested overall commute. Parts of southern Dallas have suffered from a lack of job opportunities for decades and up until recently, there were little to no sustained efforts to address the problem. The "Grow South" plan, improving educational access, and the major logistics hub development - a fourth of which lies in the city of Dallas - are all moves in the right direction.

While schools in southern DFW are frequently looked down on here, it doesn't mean that the area is completely devoid of good public schools, just as there are low performing and "not-so-good" schools in northern DFW. Then there's public charters, private schools, religious schools, open-enrollment schools, etc. People have many options available regarding educational opportunities. I could understand if most local districts had high dropout and low graduation rates, mostly "D" and "F" rated campuses, no vision to improve standards, and a corrupt superintendent/school board, but that isn't the case.

While we may not agree on everything, I appreciate your thoughts and opinions. Its much easier to exchange views with someone who is open to hearing a different perspective.
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Last edited by Acntx; 07-15-2019 at 10:39 PM..
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