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Old 01-12-2017, 08:08 PM
 
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If you are looking to get out of Chicago, but want to keep the
lake amenities, Dallas Fort Worth probably not the ticket.
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Old 01-14-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: West of Louisiana, East of New Mexico
2,671 posts, read 2,273,578 times
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For a young single person with a great income: Chicago

For a young childless couple with a great income: Both are great

For families: Dallas

Loved my time in Chicago and honestly think it's waaaay better than NYC. Chicago feels busy but not overcrowded.
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Old 01-15-2017, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Isanti County, Minnesota
3,528 posts, read 5,064,169 times
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Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Maybe because it's a flood prone, mosquito-ridden, high crime river bottom bounded on all sides by multi-lane freeways? People have been trying to convert the Trinity River bottoms into some kind of "signature park" for decades now.
There are big gators in there, too.
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Old 01-16-2017, 07:58 PM
 
4,091 posts, read 2,178,921 times
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Originally Posted by Tyryztoll View Post
There are big gators in there, too.
Wow, a real swamp or bayou? Oh wait, that is New Orleans and Houston. But then Chicago originally was a swampy area too. As early 1900a many streets we're raised a few feet and homes. Some homes not raised have frontage lower then the street exposed lower once ground or street-level. Like this area this near downtown.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9052...qCuqy1nQFw!2e0

New infill and original housing mix here. Of course now, the city's drainage is good and issues in flooding is only in very high rain times and rare in the city But more some suburban areas.

But seems Dallas has a good portion of the city flood prone and Houston. A 10,000 acre city Park/Forest Preserve proposed for a Houston flood plain region with a forest.

But then Chicago has Lake Michigan too and much of downtown. Is reclaimed land From Lake Michigan. All of downtowns Streeterville neighborhood and New East Side to Lincoln Park and Grant/Millennium/Maggie Daley Parks. Even its Museum Campus along the Lakefront.

Last edited by DavePa; 01-16-2017 at 08:14 PM..
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Old 01-17-2017, 07:06 AM
 
8,793 posts, read 4,086,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Wow, a real swamp or bayou? Oh wait, that is New Orleans and Houston. But then Chicago originally was a swampy area too. As early 1900a many streets we're raised a few feet and homes. Some homes not raised have frontage lower then the street exposed lower once ground or street-level. Like this area this near downtown.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9052...qCuqy1nQFw!2e0

New infill and original housing mix here. Of course now, the city's drainage is good and issues in flooding is only in very high rain times and rare in the city But more some suburban areas.

But seems Dallas has a good portion of the city flood prone and Houston. A 10,000 acre city Park/Forest Preserve proposed for a Houston flood plain region with a forest.

But then Chicago has Lake Michigan too and much of downtown. Is reclaimed land From Lake Michigan. All of downtowns Streeterville neighborhood and New East Side to Lincoln Park and Grant/Millennium/Maggie Daley Parks. Even its Museum Campus along the Lakefront.
The basic topography of Dallas is flat with a certain amount of rolling hills in the southern part of the county. The Trinity River is a typical river of the Great Plains in that it would naturally meander extensively through a broad flood plain, leaving rich fertile silt. Such rivers left in their natural course also tend to change course fairly often resulting in multiple oxbow lakes (observe the Red River from the air). This is 8th grade geography.

In the 1930s the course of the Trinity River was relocated some thousands of yards to the south to alleviate repeated flooding in downtown. Two levees were constructed so that when the river inevitably flooded, it would be contained between these levees. At some point southeast of downtown, the levees end, and the river returns more or less to an unconstrained plains river configuration.

The area between the levees has never been developed for residence or commercial purposes, because it is prone to flooding, exactly as designed. Being low and flat with a river working its way through it, it will always be prone to flooding. This means that nothing permanent can be installed down there unless the flood control concepts are completely redone. (I am not a flood control expert; I don't know whether there even exist better ways to control the flooding from a river like this.) It also means that, just like all bottom land in the Great Plains, it will be hot, humid, swampy, and infested with mosquitoes, snakes, critters, cat briars, and poison ivy. Finally, because there can be no permanent residential development down there, it is going to be largely deserted most of the time, thus a good place for those who would prefer their activities to remain unobserved to carry them out. Unless you post squadrons of police down there, it is always going to be a risky area. Hence the remarks from real Dallasites about "Dead bodies".

Once you get southeast of downtown, the river spreads out into a more natural configuration. Because this area of town has been a poor section for many decades, there have been many houses constructed in low lying areas where they really shouldn't have, and flood control has largely been ignored because it's a poor end of town without political clout. As a result, heavy spring and fall rains, which cause the normal flooding anyone with even an elementary grasp of geography could predict, flood the houses and businesses of many people who, to make matters worse, are the least able to weather this, and to make matters even worse, have the least influence at city hall.

The majority of middle class and upper middle class people in Dallas live in areas far from the Trinity River floodplain and are no more prone to flood issues than anywhere else in the USA. There are a few exceptions of recent subdivisions built down in creek beds, which can be avoided by anyone with reasonable common sense by looking at the drainage patterns of your candidate houses and neighborhoods.
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Old 01-17-2017, 08:54 AM
 
4,091 posts, read 2,178,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
The basic topography of Dallas is flat with a certain amount of rolling hills in the southern part of the county. The Trinity River is a typical river of the Great Plains in that it would naturally meander extensively through a broad flood plain, leaving rich fertile silt. Such rivers left in their natural course also tend to change course fairly often resulting in multiple oxbow lakes (observe the Red River from the air). This is 8th grade geography.

In the 1930s the course of the Trinity River was relocated some thousands of yards to the south to alleviate repeated flooding in downtown. Two levees were constructed so that when the river inevitably flooded, it would be contained between these levees. At some point southeast of downtown, the levees end, and the river returns more or less to an unconstrained plains river configuration.

The area between the levees has never been developed for residence or commercial purposes, because it is prone to flooding, exactly as designed. Being low and flat with a river working its way through it, it will always be prone to flooding. This means that nothing permanent can be installed down there unless the flood control concepts are completely redone. (I am not a flood control expert; I don't know whether there even exist better ways to control the flooding from a river like this.) It also means that, just like all bottom land in the Great Plains, it will be hot, humid, swampy, and infestedu with mosquitoes, snakes, critters, cat briars, and poison ivy. Finally, because there can be no permanent residential development down there, it is going to be largely deserted most of the time, thus a good place for those who would prefer their activities to remain unobserved to carry them out. Unless you post squadrons of police down there, it is always going to be a risky area. Hence the remarks from real Dallasites about "Dead bodies".

Once you get southeast of downtown, the river spreads out into a more natural configuration. Because this area of town has been a poor section for many decades, there have been many houses constructed in low lying areas where they really shouldn't have, and flood control has largely been ignored becausey it's a poor end of town without political clout. As a result, heavy spring and fall rains, which cause the normal flooding anyone with even an elementary grasp of geography could predict, flood the houses and businesses of many people who, to make matters worse, are the least a andble to weather this, and to make matters even worse, have the least influence at city hall.

The majority of middle class and upper middle class people in Dallas live in areas far from the Trinity River floodplain and are no more prone to flood issues than anywhere else in the USA. There are a few exceptions of recent subdivisions built down in creek beds, which can be avoided by anyone with reasonable common sense by looking at the drainage patterns of your candidate houses and neighborhoods.
I'm not sure if you are defending Dallas NOT being flood prone? I didn't say downtown Dallas is flood prone either. But you did explain the topography of Dallas and most only average stats on being flood prone? But seem to downplay larger areas of Dallas are still more flood prone if 4"+ rains are common yearly it seems in sever storm risk. Key words being high risk to these severe storms with sudden very heavy rains. Or just last couple years are a exception? I figured the dead bodies were joking. Just I thought of Chicago's Al Capone era of dead bodies in the Chicago river. My original reason to comment also. I added more then.

You seemed to be claiming yearly flooding is limited to these older poorer areas closest to the River and in its natural flood plain? Seems yearly getting flooding is common and 4"+ inches of rain could flood anywhere. Especially as more concrete and streets change how the water drains and if sewers don't drain it? It surely can gather quickly in severe storms dumping heavy quick rains. But I would think hearing yearly of major flooding in Dallas would be a issue in need of possible solutions? Whether just poor areas built decades ago with no zoning preventing it to more areas too?

You did acknowledge areas where a meandering Trinity river does have a large flood plain with no housing. But you didn't comment on this I mentioned ----> As a 10,000 acre city Park/Forest Preserve proposed for a Dallas flood plain region with a forest was announced. Apparently a very political proposal In Dallas in a football tossing accusing hot topic there. A 10,000 acre Park is massive in a major city. The largest parks in Chicago and Philadelphia are just a fraction of this size.

My point was in highlighting Chicago was built on a swampy plain but as the city evolved it found ways to alleviate the problems in raising streets to totally full streets with sewers to drain it.
***But then Chicago is not prone to 4"+ rains.
*** But seems Dallas is in severe storms yearly that raises it as higher then average risk?

Most homes in Chicago and North in general. Have full basements too. While Dallas is built on slabs. But still why not raise homes first floors a foot over the slabs at least? If flooding is getting more common it seems? Building them higher then the slabs in the first place too.

Homes needing no foundations or digging for a basement surely make homes cheaper to build then those in northern big cities and suburbs. I have no gripe with slab homes. Unless flooding is more common and a risk in flat areas and NOT do some elevation then?

***Yes apparently just rambling. But hopefully this spring and fall don't bring flooding in Dallas in severe storms.
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Old 01-17-2017, 09:06 AM
 
8,793 posts, read 4,086,489 times
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What I am saying is that Dallas is not particularly flood prone - except for the areas in the southeast built in the Trinity flood plain, or recently built subdivisions built in draws and creek beds where a moment's study would have shown how unsuitable building there would be. Avoid buying a low lying house in a creek bad or draw (you can see this easily if you just keep your eyes open), or down along the Trinity River in S.E. Dallas, and you will be fine.

When you hear on the news media of "major flooding" it is occurring only in those areas I have identified. I assure you there is not "major flooding" in Preston Hollow or on the Oak Cliff bluffs.

Anywhere on earth you move, you need to make sure your candidate house is not in a low lying area prone to getting flooded in heavy rain or snow melt. This is just common sense. Dallas is not New Orleans.

I think you should also look at a map and understand that the Trinity River bottoms is a relatively small section of a very large city.
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