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Old 05-20-2009, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Dallas (Devonshire)
81 posts, read 207,365 times
Reputation: 30

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You might want to re-read your former post to get some insight on who is being touchy and who is doing the name calling, as well as when you said "endless Texas landscape," not a specific area. But nice try. By all means continue.
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Old 05-20-2009, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by theloneranger View Post
The elite, old money, Protestant, $25k a year private school in Dallas is called Saint Mark's School of Texas.

So in Dallas it's rather ironic. I assumed that you were a Saint Mark's alum, my mistake.
No problem, all is forgiven. The Saint Marks where I grew up (and where my dear mother still lives) is an unincorporated crossroads with one Southern Baptist Church populated by whites and one Methodist church of African Americans and the school is single A classification in the county seat of Greenville ten miles away. About as far away from Episcopal prep school as you can get.
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Old 05-20-2009, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,774 posts, read 6,653,219 times
Reputation: 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2dfw View Post
NOT ME!!! Yikes. Makes me shudder...... You have got to really get to KNOW Dallas to know that there are indeed MANY MANY MANY great areas to live in the City Limits of Dallas. It really is a great city and it is not all crime and heavy traffic. As someone else pointed out, Frisco has far more traffic than most parts of Dallas. It does. It can take 15 minutes in the middle of the day just to go 2 blocks down Preston in Frisco. In Dallas one can be across to the other side of the city in that amount of time. Say leave Lakewood and head over to NorthPark Mall........ be there in less than 15 minutes parked. Closer in we can make last minute decisions and be anywhere in no time for dinner or whatever. The housing is MUCH better in Dallas too. Not only is it more stable in value and going up but it is a totally different feel and vibe. As another poster mentioned, character.
Wow. I know for a fact that there are many, many great places to live in the Dallas area. However, you have to make sacrifices and choices in each instance, whereas in McKinney/Frisco I don't have to make but one. The city overall is great and I will agree that it's not anything like NY back in the 70's & 80's. However, there is crime, and quite a lot of it, and oh my god...the traffic is stifling. However, I will admit, that for a city of it's size, it's better than others, and much better than smaller cities to it's South. The claim about 15 minutes and across town...come on...hyperbole is one thing, but seriously. Can you get a good ways using cross-streets? Sure, and you can make some great time, but cross city? And Lakewood to Northpark is only what...4 or 5 miles? Of course you could be there in 15 minutes.

I will have to disagree with the housing though, unless your talking about high six-figure homes, and that's another animal but Dallas is experiencing the same depression as other areas. Not as bad as some, worse than others, but still experiencing it all the same. And it does have a different vibe...old, and outdated and the "character" that I see is dilapidated. So, if you want to live in Dallas, that's great, and there are a lot of people who do. But I want new homes, and new things and events/plans made for families and close-in activities, so that I don't have to spend a fortune and time to renovate and miss the things that we can do instead. Hence, Frisco/McKinney/Allen being better and in my opinion a "destination" over Dallas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2dfw View Post
How they determined it was a "destination city" is based on how many nights the area hotels/motels were booked. Considering most of those people were probably there on business at one of the nearby locations........... I'd hardly call it a "destination city". Anyone from this area that goes to Frisco goes for one thing like FC Dallas, Dallas Tornadoes, concert at Pizza Hut Park, RoughRiders (because it is easier than going to Arlington and more "kid friendly" baseball), etc. It isn't people flocking to Frisco from around the country or world for their summer family vacation.
What's funny is that you're missing the point. If people are going there, even on business at one of the nearby locations...they have gone there as their "destination". And there is a reason for it...because there is business and other things going on there, and are probably doing it for a number of other reasons that trekking to a great ball park, w/ famously horrendous parking and traffic in coming/going modes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2dfw View Post
I KNOW!!! It is true. Frisco and McKinney have HORRIBLE traffic. Not just in rush hour either but all the time and every day of the week. It isn't fun at all. I can tell a huge difference in the traffic on 190 going East the minute I cross over 75. It suddenly changes for the better. Surface streets in Dallas are a breeze to navigate and the traffic moves freely.
Frisco/McKinney traffic is no worse than Richardson/Las Colinas, Irving, Arlington, et al. I drive all over the metroplex, so I can compare easily different areas. Traffic is bad all over, even east of 75, however after a few miles heading east it will subside somewhat compared w/ going West. Surface streets in Dallas a breeze? Please. Between road construction, detours, the traffic of a few thousand people trying to head the same way all at once, the traffic moves anything but freely. Especially within the loop.
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4th Generation Dallas View Post
You might want to re-read your former post to get some insight on who is being touchy and who is doing the name calling, as well as when you said "endless Texas landscape," not a specific area. But nice try. By all means continue.
When it is all you see to the horizon day after day without a 3 hour car trip in any one direction, the euphemism of "endless," while not completely literal, is apt nonethless.

Blasting the suburbs when you live in the wealthy half of the central city, be it my hometown city of Atlanta or my current residence in the larger Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, is snobbery plain and simple. Larger metro areas in this country are intertwined central city and suburb and it is ignorant to look down one's nose at individual areas within a larger region. This is exactly what you and other posters on this site have done regarding this thread concerning Frisco in particular and in any of numerous other threads here concerning suburban life. Sorry if you feel like it is name calling, I rather see it as holding a mirror up so you can see the effect of your own words.

The suburban cities have grown because of their connectedness to the core cities, most definitely. But without the phenomenal growth of the REGION, Dallas is nothing more than an Oklahoma City or an Albuquerque. Nothing wrong with those cities, but they are definitely second tier. Atlanta and Dallas are both on the cusp of being top tier cities, not only in this country, but on the international stage, both have grown phenomenally in the last half of the 20th century, they both are growing well in this decade. To villify the suburbs and their role in both of these cities is cutting one's nose off to spite the proverbial face.

Those of you who think you are better off than your suburban neighbors should recognize it as plain and simple snobbery. But then again, I don't have a pedigree of being a fourth generation resident of McKinney, so who am I to say anything?

Sincerely,
5th Generation St Marks, Georgia
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Dallas (Devonshire)
81 posts, read 207,365 times
Reputation: 30
Saying that Dallas might have been an OKC or ABQ is a poor analogy, particularly when you have a top 20 population city next door in Ft Worth. The region was growing regardless of whether it was in the city or in the burbs. Houston and San Antone are technically larger than Dallas. The difference lie in the semantics that each of those cities annexed land, land, and more land, so they don't have the large burbs, per se. I'd love to get into a history lesson here, but after you have assumed that I am a rich snob because I live in a certain area, my feelings are hurt.

What is apparent is that you have an axe to grind. That's part of what these forums are good for. It's therapeutic. Go for it!
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2dfw View Post
Of those cities on your list the only one I'd pick would be Dallas. Seriously.

We only go to Frisco for special events like a RoughRiders game. Much easier than going out to Arlington for the Rangers. Or a concert at Pizza Hut Park (KENNY!!! WOO-HOO ). Other than that it holds zilch interest for me or my family to want to live there.
I really think this is exactly what was meant by Frisco being a "destination city." There are the sporting venues, the IKEA (hey I don't like the stuff there either, but people drive for MILES to shop there, it is the only one in all of this half of TX.

I don't think the term "destination city" was ever meant to be that Frisco has surpassed Dallas on anyone's chart (even tho that seems to be many folks' response to this thread). Mom, you and others like you who have no other reason to come to Frisco, do come to Frisco for Rough Riders games and concerts at Pizza Hut Park. You didn't go to Flower Mound or Mansfield for these. That is all I see this destination designation as being.
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Old 05-20-2009, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4th Generation Dallas View Post
Saying that Dallas might have been an OKC or ABQ is a poor analogy, particularly when you have a top 20 population city next door in Ft Worth. The region was growing regardless of whether it was in the city or in the burbs. Houston and San Antone are technically larger than Dallas. The difference lie in the semantics that each of those cities annexed land, land, and more land, so they don't have the large burbs, per se. I'd love to get into a history lesson here, but after you have assumed that I am a rich snob because I live in a certain area, my feelings are hurt.

What is apparent is that you have an axe to grind. That's part of what these forums are good for. It's therapeutic. Go for it!
No axe here. Making this statement sounds more axe worthy:

If you like the mildly creepy master planned communities, Frisco is for you.

I have not disparaged any part of Dallas, just pointed out the snobbish attitudes that you and others have of a perfectly fine suburb, along with my observation that Dallas north of the Park Cities was basically in the 50s and 60s what Frisco is today.

Don't need a lesson in population vs. land area either. I come from Atlanta with a metro area just smaller than the combined DFW metro area and almost drawing even with the Houston metro area, but with a core city population of less than El Paso or Austin. THAT IS MY WHOLE POINT!!! A metro area as a whole is what makes a city stand above another city. When residents of the central city make condescending remarks of it's very connected suburbs, that is what is so self destructive for the area as a whole.

If pointing this fact out and calling a spade a spade (snobbishness) for whatever reason (and the reason here seems to be one's pedigree of longevity in an area that has been around longer and thus poohpoohing anything newer) is axe grinding, well then call my Paul Bunyan!
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Old 05-20-2009, 08:47 PM
 
4,304 posts, read 11,122,584 times
Reputation: 2456
I have a question for all those folks who live in Frisco/Allen/Plano. Are the majority of your neighbors from the DFW area or are they transplants. My gut tells me they are transplants but I would like to hear it from folks who live in the area instead of assuming the answer.
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Dallas
4,625 posts, read 8,528,280 times
Reputation: 3804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grainraiser View Post
I have a question for all those folks who live in Frisco/Allen/Plano. Are the majority of your neighbors from the DFW area or are they transplants. My gut tells me they are transplants but I would like to hear it from folks who live in the area instead of assuming the answer.
I'd answer that for you GR but I don't really know because I ignore my neighbors. Old habits die hard?
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:10 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 2,996,330 times
Reputation: 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grainraiser View Post
I have a question for all those folks who live in Frisco/Allen/Plano. Are the majority of your neighbors from the DFW area or are they transplants. My gut tells me they are transplants but I would like to hear it from folks who live in the area instead of assuming the answer.
Most are transplants...which I think is cool because you get to know people from a lot of different cities and walks of life. But there are some that grew up in the DFW area and still live here. In our neighborhood alone, we have people from almost every state and several from other countries.

Just because somebody is a transplant does not make them any different than anybody else or a native of a particular area. You people who bash transplants on here need to realize that if you were to move to another city, you would be considered a transplant as well.

I'm curious as to how many years you have to live in an area to not be considered a transplant anymore? I have lived in DFW for almost 8 years now and I know the area very well. Although I fit the description of a typical transplant(executive relocated from NYC), I don't really consider myself new to the area anymore. But I know that doesn't compare to you people that have lived here all your lives.
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