U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 06-03-2009, 09:31 PM
 
2,531 posts, read 5,321,556 times
Reputation: 1263

Advertisements

I guess the only way to get to a logical conclusion about this is to get someone to count each and every tree within their respective city limits.


Of course, you'll need an out-of-towner to referee.

 
Old 06-03-2009, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 22,337,052 times
Reputation: 4890
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
I guess the only way to get to a logical conclusion about this is to get someone to count each and every tree within their respective city limits.


Of course, you'll need an out-of-towner to referee.
Dallas is in the Prairie & Lakes region of the state, Houston is right at the edge of the Piney Woods where it meets the Gulf's Coastal Plains. A quick glance at a satellite photo will tell you right away most of Houston is greener than Dallas is. *I'd say anything directly south & further north of I-10 in Houston is considered to be, by large city standards, more than adequately forested for an urban area given its the 4th largest US city.

*See Memorial Park

Last edited by Metro Matt; 06-03-2009 at 11:34 PM..
 
Old 06-04-2009, 07:33 AM
 
2,531 posts, read 5,321,556 times
Reputation: 1263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Dallas is in the Prairie & Lakes region of the state, Houston is right at the edge of the Piney Woods where it meets the Gulf's Coastal Plains. A quick glance at a satellite photo will tell you right away most of Houston is greener than Dallas is. *I'd say anything directly south & further north of I-10 in Houston is considered to be, by large city standards, more than adequately forested for an urban area given its the 4th largest US city.

*See Memorial Park

Well cut my legs off and call me shorty! I swore I said that a few posts ago! Having been to both cities, I can certainly agree that Houston has a more massive tree cover than Dallas. I was being a bit facetious, but I wouldn't be surprised if someone called my bluff and actually went to count trees to prove a point. We can bring food and live bands, and scavenger hunts for the kids.


I'd also suggest potential relocators to the area use Google Streetview or Bird's Eye View (from MSN Live maps) to get a good look at the area if they are not immediately able to actually visit the area.
 
Old 06-04-2009, 09:49 AM
 
2,231 posts, read 5,320,889 times
Reputation: 535
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Well cut my legs off and call me shorty! I swore I said that a few posts ago! Having been to both cities, I can certainly agree that Houston has a more massive tree cover than Dallas. I was being a bit facetious, but I wouldn't be surprised if someone called my bluff and actually went to count trees to prove a point. We can bring food and live bands, and scavenger hunts for the kids.


I'd also suggest potential relocators to the area use Google Streetview or Bird's Eye View (from MSN Live maps) to get a good look at the area if they are not immediately able to actually visit the area.
I can apprciate your whimsy, Grindin.

As to whether more or less of a metro area is covered by forest, does it really matter? There are plenty of areas in either metro that are forested. If that means anything to a resident.

The truth is... nobody lives everywhere in a metro, they live just in a particular neighborhood. If you like living in a forest and your particular neighborhood is heavily wooded, what's the problem?
 
Old 06-04-2009, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
8,856 posts, read 10,312,965 times
Reputation: 9267
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Well cut my legs off and call me shorty! I swore I said that a few posts ago! Having been to both cities, I can certainly agree that Houston has a more massive tree cover than Dallas. I was being a bit facetious, but I wouldn't be surprised if someone called my bluff and actually went to count trees to prove a point. We can bring food and live bands, and scavenger hunts for the kids.


I'd also suggest potential relocators to the area use Google Streetview or Bird's Eye View (from MSN Live maps) to get a good look at the area if they are not immediately able to actually visit the area.
I think we could cover more area in less time if the tree counters used Caucasian skatescooters.
 
Old 06-04-2009, 02:41 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,779,846 times
Reputation: 6264
Welcome to my world - use street view and start counting

6900 tokalon dallas 75214 - Google Maps

7100 fisher road dallas texas 75214 - Google Maps
 
Old 06-04-2009, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
191 posts, read 505,425 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
too many people never get out of their own little world. You are right, there is a lot to see. Outside of Dallas, we love Waxahachie's town center and old city hall.

Nita
My own little world? Excuse me...you don't know me. Kind of judgemental, dontcha think? I lived in Texas my whole life until 2 years ago.

I've been to Waxahachie and enjoyed it, and I've been back and forth across the state of Texas, seeing much of it. As well as other states.

The original poster didn't ask about other areas, he asked about Dallas specifically. Yes, there are gorgeous courthouses in Texas, but if you want to see real history, you need to go to the Alamo or the old missions in San Antonio. Dallas is not the place to enjoy historic architectural beauty, with the exception of Fair Park or the Adolphus or a few other buildings. Even the gorgeous old bungalows in Lakewood and Lower Greenville are being ripped down at a disgusting pace.

The 1920s, while they are historic and cool, do not compare to the gorgeous old architecture up here in Milwaukee-- old German churches with the establishment date still carved above the doors, the Pabst mansion, "Old Main" at the old soldiers home, the main library, the Miller mansion....some of this stuff still dates from the 1860s and 1870s. It is valued and preserved. THAT is what I was referring to. So save the snark, please. Driving down the streets in Dallas did not make me gasp in wonder at the history.
 
Old 06-04-2009, 05:25 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,779,846 times
Reputation: 6264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cha Ching View Post
. Even the gorgeous old bungalows in Lakewood and Lower Greenville are being ripped down at a disgusting pace.
We've instituted several conservation and NSO districts to stop this and we've even gotten one historic district of over 700 homes approved. The first HD in many years to be approved. Lakewood Heights (caught by surprise) was too late to save so that's where most of 'new homes' are - a lot of great homes were torn down but they weren't really as significant as other areas such as the M-Streets or Bungalow Heaven Junius Heights - also a there were dozens of 'back houses/servants quarters' built there in the Depression which were waiting for main houses to be built on the front of the lot and that never happened. So not a huge loss on those.

In any event, the economy and lack of jumbo loans has slowed the McMansions down quite a bit.
 
Old 06-04-2009, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
191 posts, read 505,425 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
We've instituted several conservation and NSO districts to stop this and we've even gotten one historic district of over 700 homes approved. The first HD in many years to be approved. Lakewood Heights (caught by surprise) was too late to save so that's where most of 'new homes' are - a lot of great homes were torn down but they weren't really as significant as other areas such as the M-Streets or Bungalow Heaven Junius Heights - also a there were dozens of 'back houses/servants quarters' built there in the Depression which were waiting for main houses to be built on the front of the lot and that never happened. So not a huge loss on those.

In any event, the economy and lack of jumbo loans has slowed the McMansions down quite a bit.
Thank God for that, but I stand by my attitude. We lived in the 6300 block of Llano, and I drove by there before we left. Barely any of the same dwellings were still standing, including our cute little rental. The architecture here is in Milwaukee is beautiful. People buy the structures that are here, and work WITH them rather than tearing them down and building something else.
 
Old 06-04-2009, 06:29 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,779,846 times
Reputation: 6264
Yeah Llano was hit hard - I used to live across Abrams in the 6400 block of Westlake - it's in a conservation district.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top