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Old 06-03-2009, 02:52 PM
 
7 posts, read 24,974 times
Reputation: 12

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Guys,

I have just signed up for a Grand Homes and picked the standard
elevation but it has Hardi Plank in the elevation mixed with brick.
not sure if it is better or not, also does it have any effect in the resale
value of this house in the future.

Thanks All.
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Old 06-03-2009, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Austin
7,077 posts, read 16,885,085 times
Reputation: 9484
Look around you. Well over 90% of the newer homes in the area have siding mixed with brick, when a two story especially. If you haven't noticed, you're not looking at the backs. Drive down some alleys, you'll see. The siding is "hardi plank" or a comparative product. Because of costs, not many builders do a 100% brick, 2 story home... though that is more common on 1 story homes.
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Old 06-03-2009, 07:21 PM
 
27,442 posts, read 44,934,740 times
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Hardie plank--because it is composite of cement and fiber--is considered to be masonry product--akin to brick rather than the older forms of siding which were wood/plywood construction
Hardie plank can last 50 yrs so it is superior to wood siding and certainly should not be considered a lesser product--
that being said--it is cheaper than brick (because of labor mainly and other factors) and weighs less for second story--but it can be difficult to cut/apply correctly if installers don't know what they are doing...especially where windows are framed and there are intersections of angles....there are some products out there that mimic Hardie plank so make sure that is what your house actually is having--it is not cheap...

hope you had a realtor with you on this home purchase
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Old 06-03-2009, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas
4,128 posts, read 13,159,471 times
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Hardie Plank/Cemplank are a very good product that lasts a long time without needing to be replaced but it will need to be painted just like wood.

You say that it's on the front of the home. Where? May be inside the porch area?

It doesn't affect price on resale unless you think that upgrading for $1000 or so isn't worth it. It really would depend how the elevation looks, landscaping, roof line, etc.

Naima
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Old 06-04-2009, 06:42 AM
 
27,442 posts, read 44,934,740 times
Reputation: 14034
my point was that technically HardiPlank IS masony--which brick is--you can't advertise it as all-brick home but when insurance is figured it is counted as brick is counted--not like wood siding or vinyl siding is rated...
and I think for tax purposes it is probably rated higher as well
there are many homes that have quite a bit of exposed HardiPlank and it is very popular back East and in areas like Atlanta where people like the look of wood siding on exterior...
it is just newer to DFW area...
frankly I like the look of that more than some of the brick and rock looks with composite rock that I see on some houses...
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Old 06-04-2009, 03:37 PM
 
Location: North Texas
470 posts, read 1,655,220 times
Reputation: 374
Technically, HardiPlank or Hardi Board is a cementitious fiber reinforced board. No wood fibers at all. The Hardi company tried marketing it as a product that would pass the minimum masonry requirements of Developers CCRs but the Developers didn't buy it. It still looks like wood siding.

The City of Frisco requires all new homes to have Hardi Board or like product on all new homes in place of wood, such as in the soffits, frieze and fascia boards, including the wall surfaces where a siding product is specified. Doesn't rot. Termites can't eat it. Won't burn. And yes you have to paint it, but since it's much more stable than wood, paint last longer on it. It's pre-primed. It doesn't expand and shrink between the seasons and it doesn't warp or twist. So HardiPlank/Board, IMO is a good thing. I purposely put it on my home.
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Old 06-05-2009, 07:54 AM
 
7 posts, read 24,974 times
Reputation: 12
Thank you all for sharing some good info,
i feel much better now ...
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