U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 01-06-2010, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
16,050 posts, read 14,557,788 times
Reputation: 13412

Advertisements

I turned off my automatic sprinkler system way back in November!

 
Old 01-06-2010, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Forney Texas
2,119 posts, read 3,812,740 times
Reputation: 1122
why the heck does anyone water their grass in the winter anyway? Its dead!
 
Old 01-06-2010, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 5,720,659 times
Reputation: 988
Agreed, Dave. In the winter, if I water at all, it's because I went out to run a manual program to do so (if it's dry for a long time, not bad to toss some water around the foundation as a maintenance thing). But I have my sprinker timer turned off. If you have Dallas water, you're average usage for the months of Dec, Jan, Feb and March determines your sewer charges, so I try to keep our usage down during those months to minimize our sewage charges for the next year.

Brian
 
Old 01-06-2010, 08:27 AM
 
Location: High Cotton
6,131 posts, read 3,736,208 times
Reputation: 3657
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
why the heck does anyone water their grass in the winter anyway? Its dead!
The grass is not dead - it's dormant. Dormant grass needs about 1" or more of water every 4-5 weeks, which is usually supplied by natural rainfall. However, if rainfall doesn't supply this requirement it should be made up with irrigation water. If winter rye grass has been planted for winter color, it requires even more water.

It is recommended that all grass (dormant or growing rye) receive ample water prior to a deep freeze to help protect the root structure. A general rule of thumb is - if little or no water has been provided by rainfall within 5 days or so of a deep freeze, supplemental watering for grass (and shrubs) should be provided.

As an aside, just because an underground irrigation system has been turned off does not mean underground pipes cannot freeze and burst. Unless the water supply has been turned off to the irrigation system, and the solenoid valves to each zone or station has been opened so pressure is relieved in the pipes, it is susceptible to damage from a deep freeze. That said, most irrigation pipes are buried deep enough where the temperature would have to get into the single digits before much likelihood of damage would occur.

Last edited by highcotton; 01-06-2010 at 08:45 AM..
 
Old 01-06-2010, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Forney Texas
2,119 posts, read 3,812,740 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by highcotton View Post
The grass is not dead - it's dormant. Dormant grass needs about 1" or more of water every 4-5 weeks, which is usually supplied by natural rainfall. However, if rainfall doesn't supply this requirement it should be made up with irrigation water. If winter rye grass has been planted for winter color, it requires even more water.

It is recommended that all grass (dormant or growing rye) receive ample water prior to a deep freeze to help protect the root structure. A general rule of thumb is - if little or no water has been provided by rainfall within 5 days or so of a deep freeze, supplemental watering for grass (and shrubs) should be provided.

As an aside, just because an underground irrigation system has been turned off does not mean underground pipes cannot freeze and burst. Unless the water supply has been turned off to the irrigation system, and the solenoid valves to each zone or station has been opened so pressure is relieved in the pipes, it is susceptible to damage from a deep freeze. That said, most irrigation pipes are buried deep enough where the temperature would have to get into the single digits before much likelihood of damage would occur.
Well I have always shut off my sprinkler system completely the entire winter and the grass did fine whether it was dormant or dead it didn't matter. If its yellow I call it dead.
 
Old 01-06-2010, 10:29 AM
 
Location: High Cotton
6,131 posts, read 3,736,208 times
Reputation: 3657
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
Well I have always shut off my sprinkler system completely the entire winter and the grass did fine whether it was dormant or dead it didn't matter. If its yellow I call it dead.
If the grass was literally dead it would not grow again when it warms up in the spring.

During the five month dormant season (October thru February) our average rainfall is more than ample to keep the [dormant] grass alive and well. Rarely is irrigation water needed to supplement natural rainfall. That is why our grass perks right out of its dormancy once the weather starts to warm up. It really starts growing when the overnight temperature stays above 70 degrees. Even during the winter the grass plant's root system continues to grow a little.
 
Old 01-06-2010, 11:46 AM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 23,978,751 times
Reputation: 5787
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelito23 View Post
Why can't this be illegal? It is so wasteful AND dangerous. Why would you need to water dead grass when the ground is frozen anyways? Are people that lazy that they can't turn off the timer on their AUTOMATIC sprinklers?

Jerks like that should be fined big time. If water is falling or draining on cement triple the fine. And if temps are below freezing, quadruple the fine and make them liable for any accidents they cause. Nough said.
As someone else mentioned it IS illegal. They CAN get fined for it. If you see a business or house with their sprinklers on with freezing temps get the address and call and turn them in.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
Saw another one tonight on my street. Not only is it possibly the strongest stream of water I've ever seen come out of a sprinkler (ours are wimpy in comparison), but it's watering the sidewalk and the street rather than the grass. I really should get some ice skates!

Call the city and turn them in.

We have I guess some brain dead people in our neighborhood that will go thru spurts where their sprinklers are on EVERY SINGLE DAY!!! Even in the summer that is NOT recommended.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
I turned off my automatic sprinkler system way back in November!

I don't think mine have been on since June. We had so much rain this year that even when we had new sod put in after construction was done that we never had to use the sprinklers to water it. LOL!!! Mother Nature stepped up to the plate this year


Quote:
Originally Posted by highcotton View Post
If the grass was literally dead it would not grow again when it warms up in the spring.

During the five month dormant season (October thru February) our average rainfall is more than ample to keep the [dormant] grass alive and well. Rarely is irrigation water needed to supplement natural rainfall. That is why our grass perks right out of its dormancy once the weather starts to warm up. It really starts growing when the overnight temperature stays above 70 degrees. Even during the winter the grass plant's root system continues to grow a little.
Dave, listen to him. He knows what he is talking about. Dormant grass IS ALIVE and NOT dead. If you don't water it even in winter or it does not get sufficient water it will die and it won't come back in the spring.

And don't forget the FOUNDATIONS that NEED water all year long. Now don't water it when it is freezing but at other times it needs it.
 
Old 01-06-2010, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Forney Texas
2,119 posts, read 3,812,740 times
Reputation: 1122
Is watering foundations a texas thing or what? I never heard of that.
 
Old 01-06-2010, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 5,720,659 times
Reputation: 988
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
Is watering foundations a texas thing or what? I never heard of that.
Yes, it's because the expansive soils. You basically want to keep the soil under/around your foundation at a relatively constant moisture level to keep it from shifting much.
 
Old 01-06-2010, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Texas
549 posts, read 932,704 times
Reputation: 379
TXNGAL, I just drove by 2 houses w/ their sprinklers running in my neighborhood and thought of you. The one house often runs theirs, even in the winter. Ridiculous.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top