U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-23-2007, 10:18 PM
 
2 posts, read 6,992 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Hello, we are planning on moving to the Dallas area from California. My fiance is a school teacher. We are curious about the Cedar Hill area. From what we have seen online, it looks like a nice area that is out in the country with nice homes at affordable prices. Can anyone give us some information about the area? We are interested in areas with big lots with big yards and trees. We are wondering about the tax rate. We are seeing from $6,000 to $9,000 taxes and that seems a bit high even compared to Southern California. We have noticed that alot of homes have asphalt shingle or composition roofs. Is this normal construction for the area? We are looking for homes in the $200,000 - $350,000 price range. thank you.

Last edited by california128; 05-23-2007 at 10:52 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2007, 06:49 AM
 
3,035 posts, read 13,031,695 times
Reputation: 895
Taxes here are closer to 3% per appraised value.

In CA, they are closer to 1% per purchase value.

A couple of percent makes a substantial difference, but the homes you can buy here for 300k, would be over a million in CA. We also lack state sales tax, so that helps ease the pain as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2007, 09:00 AM
 
3 posts, read 9,378 times
Reputation: 11
I wasn't aware that we don't have a state sales but we don't have STATE INCOME TAX. That will typically make up for our outrageously high property taxes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2007, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 7,614,430 times
Reputation: 1033
Tax rates are actually more along the lines of 2.5-2.7% here (school tax cap is being lowered). Socketz makes an excellent point - a $250K home here would be 3x more in CA. I own a home valued at $252K. My taxes are $5435. My "taxable value" is less due to homestead exepmtion, but if you take the actual value and divide it by the total tax, it's actually only 2.15%.

Other things you'll find that will save you money in Texas:

- Gas is on average 40 cents/gal lower in TX -vs- CA
- No state income tax
- Vehicle registration is substantially lower here (have mine sitting in front of me... it's $57.10 for the year)

Things to consider (putting on my financial advisor hat here)... since you can buy substantially more home here for the money, it's worth noting that if you are comfortable with less, financially (both from a monthly mortgage payment and a yearly tax payment perspective) it's better to get less home than you can afford. In Texas, our electricity prices are about the same as in California, but due to our weather (hot in summer), we can have extremely high energy bills during June, July, Aug. That is something you should keep in mind when budgetting. Smaller homes = less space to heat/cool = lower potential bills. For reference, a 2500 sq ft home, depending on how cool you like it, how much shading the house gets, insulation, etc, etc, your jun/jul/aug bills can range anywhere from $200 to $600/month.

A friend of mine just moved from the Burbank area to Chicago. He had a 1400 sq ft condo in CA and moved into a 3900 sq ft place in Chicago. I think he's in for a rude awakening come time to heat that house in the winter. For that matter, every week, when it comes time to clean that monster he's going to second guess himself.

Anyhow, I'll get off my soap box now. Suffice it to say cost of living is overall, much cheaper in Texas.

Cedar Creek area is going though some good growth. I would suggest moving into an apartment for 6 months before you buy a home - there are so many different areas here, it's good to live in an area before taking the plunge on a home purchase.

Additionally, with the massive growth of the region (DFW increased from 5.2million in 2000 to just over 6 million people in 2005), there is a shortage of teachers, so she will have an easy time getting a job.

Let me be the first to say... Y'all, welcome to Texas.

Brian
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2007, 04:05 PM
 
3,035 posts, read 13,031,695 times
Reputation: 895
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliego View Post
I wasn't aware that we don't have a state sales but we don't have STATE INCOME TAX. That will typically make up for our outrageously high property taxes.

Your right, income tax not sales. Thanks for making the correction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2007, 08:35 AM
 
1,868 posts, read 5,143,192 times
Reputation: 525
Quote:
Originally Posted by lh_newbie View Post
Things to consider (putting on my financial advisor hat here)... since you can buy substantially more home here for the money, it's worth noting that if you are comfortable with less, financially (both from a monthly mortgage payment and a yearly tax payment perspective) it's better to get less home than you can afford. In Texas, our electricity prices are about the same as in California, but due to our weather (hot in summer), we can have extremely high energy bills during June, July, Aug. That is something you should keep in mind when budgetting. Smaller homes = less space to heat/cool = lower potential bills.




My thoughts exactly!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2007, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Plano
283 posts, read 1,017,414 times
Reputation: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by california128 View Post
We have noticed that alot of homes have asphalt shingle or composition roofs. Is this normal construction for the area? We are looking for homes in the $200,000 - $350,000 price range. thank you.
I'm in Austin in a new house with a composition roof. That's what I see here in general with new houses. Don't actually remember seeing a tile roof since I left Temecula. When I first saw the composition roof here, I did a doubletake, too.

Note for Texans: Most new houses in California have tile roofs for fire safety. You'll find few "good" new homes with anything but tile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2007, 02:48 PM
 
3,035 posts, read 13,031,695 times
Reputation: 895
We talked about composition rooves once before. I can't recall why they were so pratical for this area. For me, I like the look of the clay tile rooves more, but with the kind of winds we get here, those tiles would become projectiles quick. Also, with mostly brick construction, tile rooves may not match well.....they fit better on stucco homes, which are not popular here due to the fact they hold moisture and create a mold friendly environment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2007, 03:09 PM
 
1,868 posts, read 5,143,192 times
Reputation: 525
Quote:
Originally Posted by socketz View Post
We talked about composition rooves once before. I can't recall why they were so pratical for this area. For me, I like the look of the clay tile rooves more, but with the kind of winds we get here, those tiles would become projectiles quick. Also, with mostly brick construction, tile rooves may not match well.....they fit better on stucco homes, which are not popular here due to the fact they hold moisture and create a mold friendly environment.
It's funny...about the stucco...I thought we would see more of it out here when we moved from California...because it gets so hot out here.(stucco having a cooling effect) Also thought I'd see basements due to tornado activity but I was told the soil doesn't bode well for this sort of thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2007, 03:17 PM
 
3,035 posts, read 13,031,695 times
Reputation: 895
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannon94 View Post
It's funny...about the stucco...I thought we would see more of it out here when we moved from California...because it gets so hot out here.(stucco having a cooling effect) Also thought I'd see basements due to tornado activity but I was told the soil doesn't bode well for this sort of thing.
Exactly. I thought the same thing. Especially with the Spainish influence here - the same influence CA has....In the Summer, stucco would bode well, but I guess it's the rest of the year where it does not.

I was also looking for basements when I came out....never found one.

Even a storm cellar would have been nice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top