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Old 06-01-2007, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Topeka, KS
1,560 posts, read 6,455,866 times
Reputation: 487

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I'm planning on going with the "aluminum foil" approach. I've got a fair amount of insulation, but I could always add more.... Until the sheetrock collapses from the weight. Currently we have whirlybird vents, but eventually we'll need a new roof and we'll go with ridge vents. I need to check the skylight, I'm not sure if the opening through the attic is insulated.
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Old 06-01-2007, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 7,607,050 times
Reputation: 1033
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPadge View Post
I'm planning on going with the "aluminum foil" approach. I've got a fair amount of insulation, but I could always add more.... Until the sheetrock collapses from the weight. Currently we have whirlybird vents, but eventually we'll need a new roof and we'll go with ridge vents. I need to check the skylight, I'm not sure if the opening through the attic is insulated.
Excellent point about skylight insulation - ours is pretty bad. Will be fixing that in the coming months also. It really is about a continuous assault on all the things that rob your home of it's energy, isn't it?

I've read somewhere that every dollar per month you save on your bills will equate to $100 more resale value. I save my bills for that very reason. Well, that and I'm a geek and like to track stuff like that to see how the progress is going.

Brian
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Old 06-01-2007, 04:28 PM
 
3,035 posts, read 13,020,476 times
Reputation: 894
I've read somewhere that every dollar per month you save on your bills will equate to $100 more resale value. "

I don't follow. Figured it's good if you can advertise it of course, your home may sell faster, but I'm not sure how it equates to additional resale.

Last edited by socketz; 06-01-2007 at 04:40 PM..
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:19 PM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,242,086 times
Reputation: 5787
Do you know if you will have Garland Power & Light or TXU? Most of Garland is w/ GP&L (we own our own power and water company). If you have GP&L you can not pick another energy supplier. Years and years ago it was thought that GP&L was higher than anyone else. When we first bought in Garland I compared rates first and found them to be pretty close. I also figured out that those that complained the most about the high GP&L rates were in old apartments. We moved from Garland to another burb w/ TXU and did not see any price savings at all and actually our water bill went up DRAMATICALLY as they had to buy the water from the NTMWD (North Texas Municpal Water District that Garland owns). There is one small part of town in the south end that does have TXU. I know some people have TXU while their neighbors across the street have GP&L.

As for our highest elec bill, it was last year in the REALLY hot and dry weather and then it was around $800 and that includes water (and sewer, trash pick/up, etc). Our water rates are really good. I have a two story, 4800 sq foot w/ pool and 2 kids, 2 dogs (in & out all day and of course leaving the door open behind them - I'm swatting at a fly now.....urgh) and a hubby that MUST keep the house comfortable so our thermostats are usually set around 72-74. We keep the ceiling fans in all rooms on almost 24/7 (all bedrooms along w/ family and gameroom have fans). If we are cooking out or on the patio the ceiling fan out there is usually on. We also have a lot of windows and all of them are tinted which REALLY helps.

I know fridges take up a lot of energy and can be the worst culprits and never mentioned we have the one in the house and one in the garage along w/ a mini fridge in the media room, wine fridge in the kitchen, kegorator and 5 gallon water cooler. Gosh, GoPadge, can you figure up how much energy all that uses? Or do I really want to know? Most are fairly new and so I know they don't waste a ton of energy. What can make a HUGE difference on the garage fridges are how well insulated the garage is on the outside walls. At our old house w/ an outside east facing wall and our fridge on an interior corner it never kept drinks ice cold. Here w/ the garage w/ a west facing exterior wall w/ the fridge on THAT wall the drinks are COLD!!! I LOVE getting a gallon of milk out of the fridge then..... love ICE COLD milk. We don't keep the setting that cold either whereas at the other house we had it set to the coldest possible. Alas, the freezer part of the garage fridge has played out and now I need a new one. So it is either stick the house fridge out there and get a new one inside or get a cheap one for outside. I just don't want to get a really cheap one that is not good on the energy side. Anyone have the french door style fridge? What do you think about it? What brand? And my washing machine went out this week too.... Not a good week when it comes to appliances. Do they even make appliances that last 20 years anymore?
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
1,078 posts, read 3,438,078 times
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I really thought it would be much higher!! Here in So Cali, I currently pay right around $500+- all summer for a single story home with only 1323 sq ft!!
MBG
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:48 PM
 
1,098 posts, read 3,851,297 times
Reputation: 1902
Since you know the actual house you are looking at, you can contact the provider that the current owners are using. They will typically provide you with at least Avg/High/Low numbers for the past year. Of course, your numbers may vary based on your usage, but it will give you a starting point.
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:50 PM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,242,086 times
Reputation: 5787
Quote:
Originally Posted by TriumphOfTheSprint View Post
Since you know the actual house you are looking at, you can contact the provider that the current owners are using. They will typically provide you with at least Avg/High/Low numbers for the past year. Of course, your numbers may vary based on your usage, but it will give you a starting point.
You can also have your realtor ask for this info from the listing realtor.
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Old 06-02-2007, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Collin County
71 posts, read 309,106 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2dfw View Post
You can also have your realtor ask for this info from the listing realtor.
You always have the best advice.
Also find out what temperature the current owners are comfortable at to receive the best comparison.


TEMPERATURE SETTINGS - Set the thermostat at 78 F or higher. Each degree below 78 F means more energy use and higher cooling costs. You may want to set the thermostat even higher when you're not at home. Portable fans can help you feel comfortable at higher thermostat settings. Turn the air conditioner off when you go on vacation.
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Old 06-02-2007, 10:37 AM
 
Location: la hacienda
2,259 posts, read 8,630,145 times
Reputation: 1146
I cringed when the people buying our house wanted to know our average utility bill. I have 3 kids, lots of laundry, showers, 3 computers running, refrigerator being opened and closed constantly as well as other high energy uses that comes with a family of 5. It was just the two of them buying our house and chances are they will use less. I gave them our average kWh use and the rate at which we were charged. They can also look at their average kWh use at their old place and use the kWh price charge and come up with their own average amount.
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Old 06-02-2007, 12:49 PM
 
313 posts, read 1,569,384 times
Reputation: 80
I cant imagine an 800 electric bill! Then again, Mom that is a HUGE house and with kids and 72-74.. that's pretty low.
In our new house I think most likely we'll leave it at 80. I love the heat and when it's 100 out I wouldnt want it to be 70 in.
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