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Old 06-26-2007, 08:57 PM
 
424 posts, read 1,631,718 times
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Character is built from Morals and vice versa. It means everything to me for the kids to be in a moral environment. That's why we are willing to live in a small home and drive old cars...so we can send our kids to private Christian school. If you can build their conscience when they are little and teach them to be kind and gentle and honest, they will always have a moral compass to fall back on. How do you explain to your kids the importance of this virtue then send them on their way as youngsters into the environment you know is bad? And yes...I realize there can be bad private Christian schools as well. That would constitute finding a new one that fit our values. BTW: I'm a very compassionate, liberal conservative if there is such a thing. I'm not a bible thumper because, God knows, I did my share of bad things when I was young! My kids are just very tender hearted and I do not want that to change. They love the small school environment.

I would always consider public schools...for the record. I went to one and graduated with honors from college. I just decided to join the military first to grow up a little, serve my country and get the partying out of my system, soul search and find out what I was going to do when I grew up. A smaller school wouldn't have lost me so much.

Food for thought.

 
Old 06-27-2007, 09:52 AM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,242,086 times
Reputation: 5787
"How do you explain to your kids the importance of this virtue then send them on their way as youngsters into the environment you know is bad?"


Hmm, most of the teachers at the public schools my kids attend are very involved in their church, live in the community and involved. Most of the kids my kids attend school w/ are involved in church and have families involved in church and the community. There are the bad influences at the schools but those are everywhere. How do I teach my kids the value of good morals and virtue? By giving them opportunity to learn by their own mistakes in baby steps. That does not mean I let them do things that I know will get them into trouble but it does mean that they can learn on their own how to spot those that can bring them down. It also gives my child the opportunity to be a good influence on THOSE kids. Both of mine are very tender hearted too and one is REALLY SO! She is the one on the playground when some of her friends said something bad about another classmate she stuck up for the girl. Told them what they said was wrong and that she wanted to be the other girls friend too. It broke her heart to see kids that could be mean spirited even though they come from "good Christian families" but it taught her that even "good" people have "bad" thoughts. It opened up a chance for us as a family to talk about it at home and ways that she could make a difference on both sides. Being friends w/ those that are not getting the value of morals and virtue at home has enabled my children and our family to be a witness of how it can be to them. They invite them over to play, swim, church camp, etc. I would never send my kids into a drug infested environment or such but I don't want them to think the whole world is just peachy either.
 
Old 07-26-2007, 09:47 PM
 
2 posts, read 4,782 times
Reputation: 10
North Hills is not all it's cracked up to be. Granted, it is a school that focuses on it's academics, but as someone mentioned previously, that's not all colleges focus on anymore. I went to a private Catholic school for 9 years of my life, transferred to public my 8th grade year, and got the same if not a better education after transferring into Irving ISD. It's all a matter of perspective. If your child takes regular classes, no, he/she won't be challenged. But I took AP classes as much as possible, and was definitely challenged. Those AP teachers that I had have all been there 10+ years and have made college a breeze compared to high school. It all depends on what you think is best for your family.
 
Old 07-27-2007, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
455 posts, read 1,834,483 times
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Our friends' kids attend North Hills and love it. They live in a part of Las Colinas that's part of the Carrollton/Farmer's Branch ISD but chose North Hills instead. Not only is it closer to their house but their children aren't exposed to some of the "problems" found in the schools they'd otherwise attend.
 
Old 07-27-2007, 10:08 PM
 
709 posts, read 3,117,069 times
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Character values are taught in public schools within CFBISD as it is a mandate within the schools.

It never ceases to amaze me that people automatically assume that public schools are breeding grounds for trouble. I'm a firm believer if you choose your neighborhood, school, and church carefully your children will learn the appropriate values at home (with family support) and then carry those values over to the school environment. We, as parents, need to be more involved with the children. Unfortunately so many families depend on the school to teach the values. Shouldn't it begin at home?

North Hills likes to consider their school as private but it is indeed a charter school. It is no better than any public school and it is funded by the state.

I can honestly say I know families that left CFBISD and went to North Hills and then came back. These families found it no different as far as "problems." Plus, they said North Hills was worksheet crazy. CFBISD schools encourage higher levels of learning and don't depend on worksheets to educate.
 
Old 07-29-2007, 11:57 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,929 times
Reputation: 12
Default North Hills is a great option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonshinelife View Post

North Hills likes to consider their school as private but it is indeed a charter school. It is no better than any public school and it is funded by the state.

This statement is so far off base that it is absurd!
North Hills by no means prefers to consider itself a private school. In fact it is on the forfront of many fights for state legislation to further recoganize charter schools as public schools of choice and recieve the same funding as local public schools.

North Hills differs because it does not have attendance boundries or local tax funds as public school districts do.

I have a personal interest in the school because my brother graduated in 2005 after spending 6th through 12th grade in the rigourous program.
My sister is beginning her 9th grade year and has been enrolled since 2nd grade, a member of the first primary school classes.
I am a former employee as a substitute and replacement teacher, who now teaches in another local district.

The school has been a God-send for our family.

The school's focus is academics which lends a group of students whose familes have a focus on education putting forth an atmosphere of strong character. Which is taught yes by many other schools but must be reinforced at home as well. Schools DO NOT raise children no matter which district they are in, Parent do!
By having parents who care and pay attention to their student's education then alot of the other problems that face many schools like drugs, pregnancy, alcohol, and fights are not seen has heavily if at all at TNHS. The atmoshpere of the school is a large family.

As a note my brother has ADHD and was successful at North Hills. My sister has ADD and dyslexia and has been EXTREMELY successful.
At our local public school (IISD) my sister's 1st grade teacher wanted to pass her to 2nd grade claiming she was reading ABOVE grade level. My mom knew this was not true and that my sister had just memorized the book (something she is very good at to this day) but the teacher did not agree and because my sister was such a sweet child who did not cause trouble she tended to fly below radar (this teacher was considered a master teacher).
We moved her in 2nd grade to North hills (this was the first year the school had primary grades) and within the first week of school her teacher knew that she had a problem and that it was probably dyslexia. She saw that she was not reading above grade level but 1.5 years BELOW! After tests and diagnoses from Scottish Rite her special education teacher at North Hills worked with my sister daily to the point that at the end of 3rd grade she took the regular TAKS test and not only passed but recieved a commended score! in the 7th grade she was recommended for honors/pre-ap language arts classes.
She now can read her required texts on her including Lord of the Flys and Pride and Prejudice.


As for homework, yes there is a load but seeing things from both the home side and the teacher side students are given ample time to complete most assignments during the school day and in fact from 7th grade on students have the option for study hall periods (my brother had 4 study halls during senior year due to advance courses) which if used properly would allow for lighten to no homework loads. However having monitered these sessions, many students choose to socialize, as teens will do causeing the large HW loads.

North Hills has been a great option for parents who want a more rigourous school for their child but can not afford private tuition.
 
Old 07-30-2007, 05:56 AM
 
709 posts, read 3,117,069 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasAgBelle View Post
This statement is so far off base that it is absurd!
North Hills by no means prefers to consider itself a private school. In fact it is on the forfront of many fights for state legislation to further recoganize charter schools as public schools of choice and recieve the same funding as local public schools.

Then why the bumper stickers you see around town? Why do the parents I have a chance to speak with claim this is why they are leaving public school? Parents, have said to me, "We're leaving because we want private for our children."

North Hills differs because it does not have attendance boundries or local tax funds as public school districts do.
Yes you are correct on this one.

I have a personal interest in the school because my brother graduated in 2005 after spending 6th through 12th grade in the rigourous program.

Rigorous if you consider worksheets rigorous.


My sister is beginning her 9th grade year and has been enrolled since 2nd grade, a member of the first primary school classes.
I am a former employee as a substitute and replacement teacher, who now teaches in another local district.

Glad it has worked for your sister and others. I just don't personally believe in a worksheet mentality. I believe in teaching children cognitive high level strategies that will prepare them for the future. Worksheets are not the way to get to this in my opinion.

The school has been a God-send for our family.
I'm glad your family found North Hills and I sincerely mean this, as it seems that North Hills worked for your family. I have to ask thought if you are so passionate about NH's why didn't you elect to teach there instead of another district?

The school's focus is academics which lends a group of students whose familes have a focus on education putting forth an atmosphere of strong character. Which is taught yes by many other schools but must be reinforced at home as well. Schools DO NOT raise children no matter which district they are in, Parent do!

No one said that schools raise children. Matter of fact I said just the opposite. I think it should start at home and continue at school. Parents should be the number one force behind to raising children. I'm a parent and teach my own son to live a quality value, moral, life. I however, would hope the school would follow up with basic character values such as integrity, respect, etc. It never hurts for children to see it across the board.

By having parents who care and pay attention to their student's education then alot of the other problems that face many schools like drugs, pregnancy, alcohol, and fights are not seen has heavily if at all at TNHS. The atmoshpere of the school is a large family.
Sorry, but I don't buy there this whole argument. Pregancy happens everywhere. I have a personal friend that in her teens at a local private school/ Christian to boot became a teen mom. She said her's was the first publically addressed at that school but there were a lot of others. Now , she had top notch caring parents just like many others. Sadly, though things can happen to good families too. No one plans these things. It happens and if it hasn't at NH's it will. The same for drugs etc.. I'd like to believe there is a perfect school out there for our children. But reality is you are going to find these problems everywhere. NH's may have less of the problems but reality is the NH's isn't perfect. There are still family issues.

As a note my brother has ADHD and was successful at North Hills. My sister has ADD and dyslexia and has been EXTREMELY successful.
I'm extremely happy for your brother and sister. As I know ad/hd and dyslexia are very difficult. I have a son with ad/hd and I work with the dyslexia students at my school.

At our local public school (IISD) my sister's 1st grade teacher wanted to pass her to 2nd grade claiming she was reading ABOVE grade level. My mom knew this was not true and that my sister had just memorized the book (something she is very good at to this day) but the teacher did not agree and because my sister was such a sweet child who did not cause trouble she tended to fly below radar (this teacher was considered a master teacher).
We moved her in 2nd grade to North hills (this was the first year the school had primary grades) and within the first week of school her teacher knew that she had a problem and that it was probably dyslexia. She saw that she was not reading above grade level but 1.5 years BELOW! After tests and diagnoses from Scottish Rite her special education teacher at North Hills worked with my sister daily to the point that at the end of 3rd grade she took the regular TAKS test and not only passed but recieved a commended score! in the 7th grade she was recommended for honors/pre-ap language arts classes.
She now can read her required texts on her including Lord of the Flys and Pride and Prejudice.
Again, I'm extremly excited and thrilled for your sister. I'm sure she has worked hard to reach where she is today. I'm sorry your sister had a teacher that appeared to be way off base with her observations. However, this isn't the case in many of the quality public schools. I work for another school district and we work to not have this happen. Teacher training is on-going within our district for the most effective ways to teach dyslexic children as well as second language learners, and the Gifted/Talented students.


As for homework, yes there is a load but seeing things from both the home side and the teacher side students are given ample time to complete most assignments during the school day and in fact from 7th grade on students have the option for study hall periods (my brother had 4 study halls during senior year due to advance courses) which if used properly would allow for lighten to no homework loads. However having monitered these sessions, many students choose to socialize, as teens will do causeing the large HW
loads.I would have to wonder why these students are getting by in study hall with doing nothing. This would concern me as a parent. I'd rather have my child taking courses that broaden their cognitive learning and prepare them for the future rather than attending a special class set aside for study hall. If your brother was so advanced in why didn't he attend other classes to enrich his learning further? I personally find 4 classes of study hall a little over the top.

North Hills has been a great option for parents who want a more rigourous school for their child but can not afford private tuition.
I'm sure NH's is right for many that attend, however, I again don't consider worksheets and a load of homework rigorous. I consider it fluff. Homework should be for practice. Doing a 100 problems of addition is not practice. Doing 10 gets the same job done.
 
Old 08-23-2007, 03:16 PM
 
58 posts, read 202,802 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonshinelife View Post
I'm sure NH's is right for many that attend, however, I again don't consider worksheets and a load of homework rigorous. I consider it fluff. Homework should be for practice. Doing a 100 problems of addition is not practice. Doing 10 gets the same job done.
LOL! I have never posted here before, but was looking up schools online. This is hilarious. I am sorry, but what you're saying is akin to saying that I can get the same results physically with 10 minutes of exercise weekly as opposed to 10 hours. LOL. That's so inaccurate. People are so scared of rote learning, but honestly, for children, the key to learning and growing is enforcement of rules, ideals, and yes, lessons in school.

I won't be posting here again, so no need to debate, but I honestly laughed out loud when I read this post!
Vicki
 
Old 08-23-2007, 11:02 PM
 
709 posts, read 3,117,069 times
Reputation: 201
Just in case you changed your mind and are reading to see if you got a rise out of me...

Vicki...exercise and worksheets are not even in the same ballpark. I have to say laughter came to mind when I read your post.

Rote learning is not the way to learn. I'd rather have my children think at a higher level. I'd rather they know why 2+2=4 than to just say it is 4. Read Marzano's research, Deb Miller's books, Lucy West:Cognitive Guided Instruction (and others) and you'll see that learning is not just rote. It's not that people are scared of rote... it's that they want more rigor for their children. Parents, teachers, and administrators want critical thinking skills to be in place so that the child will be able to keep up with the demands of our world.

Sidenote: Check Northhills TAKS scores... tell me if you think the worksheet theroy works. If I read the Morning News correctly it mentioned academically acceptable. Hmm....
 
Old 09-28-2007, 10:16 PM
 
46 posts, read 178,135 times
Reputation: 42
North Hills is an incredible program. It doesn't really sound like you have even spent one day there Sonshine. It isn't all about worksheets--actually the program combines several approaches depending upoin grade level. Their scores are impressive when compared to any district in the metroplex other than HP.

Last edited by AustinTraveler; 09-30-2007 at 09:53 AM.. Reason: Personal attack.
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