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Old 07-05-2011, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,859,572 times
Reputation: 619

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet_kinkaid View Post
source us census ...2010 census msa columbus ohio msa =13% growth,indianapolis indiana msa=11% growth,louisville kentucky msa=12% growth...combined dayton cincy msa=1% growth
Wouldn't Dayton's slower growth put a hamper on Metro Cincinnati's 5% growth rate?
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Old 07-06-2011, 06:21 PM
 
33 posts, read 78,032 times
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Dayton and Cincy will never be twin cities... but I do believe by the next census they could be considered one metro area or MSA. I dont think it would make either city any more desirbale then they already so I don't know what the benefits would be if they were to become one MSA.



if they were to become one MSA
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Old 07-06-2011, 06:39 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,670,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarter614 View Post
Dayton and Cincy will never be twin cities... but I do believe by the next census they could be considered one metro area or MSA. I dont think it would make either city any more desirbale then they already so I don't know what the benefits would be if they were to become one MSA.



if they were to become one MSA
There are some benefits, the biggest being that one large metroplex would enjoy greater stature naturally due to its size and clout.

The Enquirer looked at this topic last year:

The resulting 19-county Cincinnati-Dayton area would have a population estimated at approximately 3 million, making it the 15th highest population center in the nation. Cincinnati-Middletown is now the 24th most populous; Dayton is 61st.

Such a change could alter perceptions of the region to those outside of it, and within.
The combined population might raise Southwest Ohio's profile, particularly when it comes to attracting businesses. Cincinnati-Dayton would be one of four metropolitan areas with two top-100 commercial airports, Rexhausen said.
Having ready access to highway and ground transportation could spur a synergy as, for example, high-tech medical industries that have sprouted in the area attract other supporting businesses - and more high-paying jobs.


http://www.economicscenter.org/press...e-one-city-now

There's no doubt, however, that such a metroplex would be risky for Cincinnati in several ways, due to Montgomery County's median household income that, when added to the rest of the region, would lower Cincinnati's number and make it seem as if jobs here don't pay as well. And the Dayton area's shrinking population would put a damper on the Cincinnati areas increasing numbers.
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Old 07-10-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,578 posts, read 2,314,725 times
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Well With it soon to be one urbanized area it will be one combined MSA.

http://www.census.gov/geo/www/ua/fedregv75n163.pdf


This is assuming no addition counties are added to each metro. Which it could be a good possibility.

Cleveland-Akron-Canton. MSA: 3,184,862 CSA: 3,286,359

Cincinnati-Dayton-Springfield. MSA: 3,109,986 CSA: 3,245,082
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Old 07-10-2011, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,852,555 times
Reputation: 5488
I keep hearing this talk and it just makes me think that it's about trying to put a blinder over facts. Dayton is doing terribly economically and in population and Cincy's only measurable growth is surburban sprawl to the North, which is the last thing an urban center needs. I know it will ultimately be decided by the Census data, but the two cities just seem way too far apart and don't have the kind of influence/connectivity that some of the other combos have.
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Old 07-10-2011, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,852,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
You're free to continue to think what you want. Facts, unfortunately, don't agree.

Cincinnati and Dayton will absolutely be considered one large area in the next two to three years. Do you have linkable proof, and not personal opinions and biases, that would suggest otherwise? And do you dispute that some MSAs have two points that are considerably further apart than Troy and northern Kentucky?

And you're right, nobody takes Indianapolis, Columbus or Louisville seriously because of the ridiculous smoke and mirror ways they used to artificially make their CITY larger. As you know, metros aren't cities, and Cincinnati-Dayton blow each of those three out of the water.
He does ask a good question... Why would Dayton-Cincy make more sense than say, Akron-Cleveland, which are much closer to each other and both larger in size and have more influence regionally?
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Old 07-10-2011, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,852,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCC Grad 2011 View Post
I doubt it. It looks like 50% of the board posts stuff without any proof. I won't name any names . You are right. Cincy is not shrinking. People are selling those high priced yuppy houses in Northern Kentucky and moving back over to the Ohio side of the river
Cincy proper is definitely shrinking. All of Cincy's growth has been in the far suburbs. This is the opposite of what you want in terms of healthy growth. This is not a bash on Cincy, I like the city a lot. I just think the argument of a Cincy-Dayton metro is simply trying to cover up real problems.
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Old 07-10-2011, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,578 posts, read 2,314,725 times
Reputation: 651
If Ohio didn't think it was needed. They would never have widened I-75 between the two metro's to 8 lanes. They are planning for bigger and better things.

Listen. The Census and State official have data that me or you don't have. They are the ones doing the studies and making the decisions. They don't go on opinions. Just facts.

Last edited by unusualfire; 07-10-2011 at 09:52 AM..
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Old 07-10-2011, 11:08 AM
 
5,324 posts, read 6,664,016 times
Reputation: 2666
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I keep hearing this talk and it just makes me think that it's about trying to put a blinder over facts. Dayton is doing terribly economically and in population and Cincy's only measurable growth is surburban sprawl to the North, which is the last thing an urban center needs. I know it will ultimately be decided by the Census data, but the two cities just seem way too far apart and don't have the kind of influence/connectivity that some of the other combos have.

I keep reading on these forums that the cities of Cincinnati and Dayton are growing. Now I hear this isn't true. Who is right?
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Old 07-10-2011, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,852,555 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
I keep reading on these forums that the cities of Cincinnati and Dayton are growing. Now I hear this isn't true. Who is right?
The Cincinnati metro grew by about 6%, most of it outside of Hamilton County, but the city itself lost 10.4% of it's population from 2000 to 2010. It has been shrinking every decade since 1950.

The Dayton metro shrank by about 0.8%, and the city shrank by 14.8% from 2000 to 2010 and has been shrinking every decade since 1960.

For comparison, Columbus' metro grew by 13.88% with the city growing by 10.6%, the vast majority of that having nothing to do with annexation.
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