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Old 02-15-2013, 06:28 PM
 
41 posts, read 51,896 times
Reputation: 39

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As you can see via my post, that it was not me. When I departed DAYTON, Dayton View was all Jewish, so was Salem Ave. So all of that has changed, as well as the complex of the entire city. White people, move to get away from Jews, Jews run from Blacks, Blacks run fron other Blacks. Everybody is running from eachother.

 
Old 02-16-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,012,544 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. PRICE View Post
As you can see via my post, that it was not me. When I departed DAYTON, Dayton View was all Jewish, so was Salem Ave. So all of that has changed, as well as the complex of the entire city. White people, move to get away from Jews, Jews run from Blacks, Blacks run fron other Blacks. Everybody is running from eachother.
Hi J. PRICE--

I don't often agree with Esrati but I believe he has a valid point on why people left Dayton if they could: he thinks that in addition to the loss of manufacturing, school busing accelerated white flight out of the city (who were, by and large, the only ones with the financial wherewithal to do so).
 
Old 02-16-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,121,445 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. PRICE View Post
The PEOPLE OF power in Ohio are as backward as power in Miss. THE Ohio leader in the house of Reps. knows as much of comopromise, as two fighying Roosters. Where are the Tafts, Bickers, of yesteryear????? People of WISDOM.
Two fighting roosters?

A modern Taft did get into some trouble.

By the way, I did read your blog postings. You should put some more stuff in there.
 
Old 02-17-2013, 12:48 PM
 
41 posts, read 51,896 times
Reputation: 39
Wink Salem Ave.

YOU DON'T READ VERY WELL. TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT SALEM AVE. AND YOU WILL SEE if it is ME or Salem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
Yours or that of Salem Avenue?
 
Old 02-17-2013, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. PRICE View Post
YOU DON'T READ VERY WELL. TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT SALEM AVE. AND YOU WILL SEE if it is ME or Salem.
Salem Ave sucks. It's business districts are empty, there are ghettos all up and down, and it only gets worse the further away from downtown you get.
 
Old 02-18-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: A voice of truth, shouted down by fools.
1,086 posts, read 2,222,357 times
Reputation: 893
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi J. PRICE--

I don't often agree with Esrati but I believe he has a valid point on why people left Dayton if they could: he thinks that in addition to the loss of manufacturing, school busing accelerated white flight out of the city (who were, by and large, the only ones with the financial wherewithal to do so).
I was attending Dayton schools when the early wave of busing kicked in - the "magnet schools" concept of 1975 forward, where the college prep kids would get bused to magnet school sites for advanced courses like urban affairs or intro calculus. So at first in Dayton busing was voluntary/self selected and later became mandatory.

I remember hearing a lot of murmurs from other kids that their parents were thinking of moving out of the city if busing progressed. By the early 80s around town when full on busing was in place it was perceived among middle class whites that if you remained in Dayton itself you were either stupid, or too old to move.

Also, we had stagflation in the late 70s and a huge recession around 1980-82, which coincided with busing implementation. Also, a lot of GM jobs were bleeding out at the time.

I'm kind of thinking that if Dayton had undergone busing a few years earlier or later in a better economy, the city's real estate demographics would have stayed relatively stable.

Busing+"Carter recession" == double whammy.

Last edited by Ohioan58; 02-18-2013 at 11:08 AM..
 
Old 02-19-2013, 06:44 PM
 
41 posts, read 51,896 times
Reputation: 39
Smile Ohio

My experince of 82 years of life, tells me although Ohio is above the Mason Dixon line, the state has always been, and still is very Southern in their way of thinking, and attitude. Maybe the northern part of the state may be a small bit more liberal. When I came to Dayton, (my, my) was it conserative, and that was back in 1945, not much has changed. Only diffenrce in Dayton, and the SOUTH WAS; there were no signs posted for the race restrooms or water fountians. I worked for years, with others trying to get C. J. Mclin Sr. elected to the city council of Dayton, well his granddaughter beccame Mayor, how about that? His son became State Rep. much changed there. But as I watch ( from afar ) poltics in Ohio are at a place for improvement. GOOD LUCK DAYTON
 
Old 02-20-2013, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,121,445 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. PRICE View Post
My experince of 82 years of life, tells me although Ohio is above the Mason Dixon line, the state has always been, and still is very Southern in their way of thinking, and attitude. Maybe the northern part of the state may be a small bit more liberal. When I came to Dayton, (my, my) was it conserative, and that was back in 1945, not much has changed. Only diffenrce in Dayton, and the SOUTH WAS; there were no signs posted for the race restrooms or water fountians. I worked for years, with others trying to get C. J. Mclin Sr. elected to the city council of Dayton, well his granddaughter beccame Mayor, how about that? His son became State Rep. much changed there. But as I watch ( from afar ) poltics in Ohio are at a place for improvement. GOOD LUCK DAYTON
And, isn't it a shame his other granddaughter seems to have ruined it all.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 05:19 PM
 
41 posts, read 51,896 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi J. PRICE--

I don't often agree with Esrati but I believe he has a valid point on why people left Dayton if they could: he thinks that in addition to the loss of manufacturing, school busing accelerated white flight out of the city (who were, by and large, the only ones with the financial wherewithal to do so).
Thanks, very much, Happy some else can see the LIGHT.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 06:49 PM
 
6,817 posts, read 4,410,206 times
Reputation: 11929
I first became associated with Dayton around 1993... so about 20 years ago. During those 20 years I've seen one major business after another close its doors, relocate or go bankrupt. Several of the storied "invented in Dayton" manufacturers have departed just in the past 10 years. Dayton didn't benefit appreciably from the IT boom in the late 1990s, and suffered grievously in the Great Recession. Instead of up-down oscillations, its modern history feels like monotonic decline.

Part of my job involves working with engineering-students at a local university. These aren't English majors; they're engineers. And the prevailing sentiment is that local jobs can't be found, even if the students have excellent grades. The best remedy seems to be to move away. It's not a question of downtown Dayton vs. suburbs, east-side vs west-side, Beavercreek and Centerville growing at the purported expense of everyone else. It's an issue for the entire region, if not for every small to medium city in the Midwest.

When I first moved to Dayton, it struck me as a blend between a smaller version of Detroit and the South. That is, it had the feeling of post-industrial decline as in Detroit, and segregation like in the old south. Beavercreek and Centerville are to Dayton, what Ann Arbor is to Detroit... the "nice" neighborhood where the wealthier and more cultured people live.

Pondering this further, the explanation is that like Detroit, Dayton was too closely tied to the automotive industry. Like Detroit, Dayton was populated in the mid decades of the 20th century by influx of persons from disadvantaged rural communities in pursuit of a middle-class lifestyle on an assembly-line job. That lifestyle was sustainable for 1-2 generations, but not anymore As America deindustrializes, towns like Dayton will be especially hard-hit.
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