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Old 07-07-2013, 06:21 PM
 
3,515 posts, read 3,795,638 times
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Yes hensleya1, I can see why you want to move. Completely understandable haha - same feelings as me about local politics, just the other end of the spectrum.


WSU is located primarily in Fairborn, although Beavercreek surrounds it on at least 2 sides. I was basically re-stating the lamenting of all of the WSU greek life participants I know. They always blame Beavercreek's ordinance against frat houses, most likely because where the houses would lie (along Zinc Rd.) is in Beavercreek. Kauffman Rd. would make putting any new development like that in Fairborn somewhat awkward, unless WSU allowed them to construct on campus (but then what would be the draw of living in a greek house?).

What I wish would happen is WSU finds a developer and allows them to develop the land directly east of Meijer along Colonel Glenn into a "student city". That would be the area right by the main entrance into WSU off Colonel Glenn where the baseball field and small surface parking lot is located.

Or maybe Meijer could be bought out and move elsewhere (like by N Fairfield and Kemp behind Milano's next to Target) and a development could occur on the site for students. Either way that would be in Beavercreek city limits. Right now, the area which seems to serve most as a "WSU student hub" is the small shopping center at the southwest corner of N. Fairfield and Colonel Glenn with the Bob Evans, First Watch, Texas Roadhouse, and off-campus bookstore.


As far as the walking trail goes, it would be a new bridge across I-675. It was proposed over a year ago. I'm assuming I haven't heard anything about it since because Beavercreek residents either 1) shot it down due to increased taxes or 2) shot it down due to NIMBY-ism. There is also the third possibility that funding for it was cut at the state level (blaming Republicans), or the federal level (which would probably be an easy line item for Democrats to cut since they don't have much of a base in the area).

Here is the proposal:
http://ci.beavercreek.oh.us/wp-conte...e-exhibits.pdf
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Old 07-07-2013, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Ohio
231 posts, read 243,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
In my opinion, most suburbs provide little value as a commodity, although recent developments like Carriage Trails, the Greene, and Settler's Walk have upped the value proposition and added many amenities into the character of the developments themselves. That's the main issue for me - the adamant fear-based rejection of public services despite the greater good they provide.
I agree, the general fear of anything urban in the American suburb is astounding. I had no problem with this, really no awareness of it until the past couple of years. After living on a college campus for 4 years I began to love constantly being around people, walking to class, taking the bus etc. Coming back to Beavercreek everything just seems so dead, dull and boring. I feel like suburbia is where life comes to die.

I've always considered myself to be a country person but now I'm not so sure. A lot of my qualities were derived from my parents who regularly shunned the city and did their best to avoid it. I know my parents have never lived in a big city...I'm not even sure if they've been to one. Needless to say I'm seeking jobs in an urban environment. I'd like to try it out for a while.

I know that was a little off topic...
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Old 07-08-2013, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,838,058 times
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Originally Posted by andrewC7 View Post
I've always considered myself to be a country person but now I'm not so sure.
I dunno. For me there is a difference between dead suburban, and country. The country towns I lived in had charm and a sense of community. Plus they had local watering holes where everyone knew each other, local markets, mom and pop businesses, etc.

Suburbia is mostly devoid of these community staples, at least in my experiences anyway. I prefer city living, but would take country over suburban any day.
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Old 07-08-2013, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
11,806 posts, read 9,749,941 times
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Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I dunno. For me there is a difference between dead suburban, and country. The country towns I lived in had charm and a sense of community. Plus they had local watering holes where everyone knew each other, local markets, mom and pop businesses, etc.

Suburbia is mostly devoid of these community staples, at least in my experiences anyway. I prefer city living, but would take country over suburban any day.
Ditto. If you're not going to be in an urban area where you can take advantage of all it has to offer, it's best to go rural where you can truly enjoy nature and everything it has to offer. Both have character and please the senses, while suburbia is offensive to both urbanity and nature.
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Old 07-08-2013, 11:10 AM
 
1,007 posts, read 911,313 times
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Best way to "show Beavercreek" is to spend your dollars somewhere else
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Old 07-08-2013, 11:56 AM
 
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^True, although it is near impossible to buy everything you need within city limits (although I guess I'm excluding people who have a laptop and knowledge of amazon haha).

I still believe Beavercreek is missing a bet keeping bus service away. I'm sure Easton and Kenwood both have bus service. As does the Greene, arguably now the premier shopping destination in the Dayton area.
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Old 07-08-2013, 11:59 AM
 
3,515 posts, read 3,795,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewC7 View Post
I agree, the general fear of anything urban in the American suburb is astounding. I had no problem with this, really no awareness of it until the past couple of years. After living on a college campus for 4 years I began to love constantly being around people, walking to class, taking the bus etc. Coming back to Beavercreek everything just seems so dead, dull and boring. I feel like suburbia is where life comes to die.

I've always considered myself to be a country person but now I'm not so sure. A lot of my qualities were derived from my parents who regularly shunned the city and did their best to avoid it. I know my parents have never lived in a big city...I'm not even sure if they've been to one. Needless to say I'm seeking jobs in an urban environment. I'd like to try it out for a while.

I know that was a little off topic...
I'm in your age group and I feel the same way with the same background. I'm sure we are not the only two either.

The tides are turning...
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Old 07-08-2013, 12:42 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,764,994 times
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Quote:
think watching Leitzell get pushed off the ballot in the fall to watch two Democrats run for the mayor's seat was the last straw (when the Democrats, who have singlehandedly dominated this city for decades, are largely responsible for its continued fall
).

this injects a partisan spin on the issue....
Now, down in Louisville the city is pretty much dominated by the Dems, tho there is a healthy GOP minority on their city council, and prior to merger the GOP did occasionally win county commission seats and the county judge/executive (which is sort of like being the mayor of the county...Mitch McConnell got his start as county judge-executive).

Yet Louisville is doing quite well. Yes there are issues there with the public school system, for similar reasons there are issues with the Dayton system, but the white upper-middle class have not deserted the city to the extent they have in Dayton. In fact the Louisville metro area appears to be a magnet for college-educated young adults, many of whom are moving into the city.

So I wouldn’t put urban success or failure down to “the Democrats” (do we really mean the liberals”?). The situation in the Dayton metro is specific to Dayton, the extent to which “urbanism” or “the city” has been rejected by the suburban community, including young adults. You do not find this in Louisville, or Lexington, for that matter.
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Old 07-08-2013, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,386 posts, read 3,711,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
...I still believe Beavercreek is missing a bet keeping bus service away. I'm sure Easton and Kenwood both have bus service. As does the Greene, arguably now the premier shopping destination in the Dayton area.
I can't speak for Easton, but Kenwood's served by Queen City Metro's # 4 Route (one of Cincinnati's most heavily-ridden routes). Diverse people, originating anywhere from downtown to Silverton, travel to Kenwood and beyond and nobody blinks an eye. (However, crossing Montgomery Rd. and traversing the huge parking lot into the mall can prove to be a challenging experience, itself.) Nevertheless, just as Kenwood has done, Beavercreek needs to do--open itself to an additional diverse clientele.
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,070,199 times
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Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
^True, although it is near impossible to buy everything you need within city limits (although I guess I'm excluding people who have a laptop and knowledge of amazon haha).

I still believe Beavercreek is missing a bet keeping bus service away. I'm sure Easton and Kenwood both have bus service. As does the Greene, arguably now the premier shopping destination in the Dayton area.
I use to live In dayton, though am I lifelong Columbusite. And I get so much entertainment listening to these crazy, conservative issues/debates. It is so sad that these suburbs are so excluded from the city, but that is Dayton for you.

Yes, in Columbus you can reach all major commercial centers by bus. Easton even has a transit center across the street from it. Polaris (in even another county) and Tuttle, etc all have buses. Many suburbs have busing going through their streets (even newer ones not just inner ring of course).

Columbus is a more "compact" metro though. You don't have the suburbs that lye in the distance from the city. In Dayton you have this underdeveloped area between the city and suburbs. In Columbus everything is just continous development and it runs together. Lines are blured and the "fear" of the other is gone.
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