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Old 07-10-2014, 07:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
I'm going to pick on this statement, because I have big issues with it. The first time I ever even drove up to Dayton, it was in May of 2011 to attend a week-long preview class that was being hosted at UD's law school. I decided to crash on a friend's couch for the week (I paid him in beer), and he lived at Austin Springs, those apartments on the other side of 741 and Austin Blvd. He told me "Austin Landing is a brand new exit, it's not even on the map yet". Of course, when I got there, he was right - there was a highway interchange, lights that weren't even operational yet, and a big dust bowl where Thompson Hine is now located.

Fast forward just three years, and how much development has entered the area (and is still planned/under construction? We gripe about the traffic problems that area has, but guess what? Traffic problems are a good thing. That means an area is growing, it's creating jobs, and money is being made. Yes, it is an issue that needs to be handled accordingly... firstly by ripping up that idiotic intersection and installing a normal traffic light.

***

But is Austin Landing a success or failure? That depends on what you're looking at. I'll touch on a few of the parties involved in the creation of Austin Landing:

Miami Township: gets thousands of jobs and has funded the infrastructure through TIF, money that wouldn't otherwise be there. It's become a major employment center, and since it's a JEDD, gets millions of dollars of tax revenue that it wouldn't have otherwise seen. Sure, only certain workers are taxed. But an office worker (who doesn't pay taxes) still shops and dines in the area on their lunch break... that benefits the business and the workers. It's a pretty clear winner for the township.

Randy Gunlock: This guy is laughing all the way to the bank as he knows Austin Landing is eating downtown's lunch from here all the way to Cincinnati. RG Properties, which bought the land and pitched the JEDD idea to Miami Township, makes a killing every time a building is built and leased out. He's definitely a winner.

Thompson Hine/Teradata/Chark Schaefer Hackett/Ameriprise/Kettering Health/etc...: Let's see here, they can locate downtown, pay market rates for buildings that haven't been updated in twenty-plus years, fight with parking downtown, fight with the nightmare of construction on I-75, pay city taxes and get nothing in return for it...

Or they can locate near a highway interchange that isn't screwed up, avoid paying city taxes, locate in a brand new building, with free parking, and access to a wide variety of restaurants and amenities that Downtown utterly lacks? Sounds like a pretty simple business decision. Businesses win by moving to Austin Landing.

***

To at least a few people, there's a few clear losers:

Downtown Dayton: Due to the aforementioned "business decision", almost any job that moves to Austin Landing (rather than being 'created') was at the expense of downtown. It's been a long time in coming, and frankly, overdue. Think about it, when the city of Dayton hiked the income tax in 1980, it was sold to city residents by saying "all those suburban workers will have to pay it, benefiting you, but they will have no say in the city. Let's stick it to those sods who abandoned the city." Well, that charade worked great until people decided to both live and work in the suburbs.

The only way to make downtown competitive is to improve access, reduce regulations and layers of government, and lower the city tax rate to make it competitive with the suburbs from a financial standpoint.

Regionalism: Because of the spectacular failure of Dayton to keep and retain jobs (while the suburbs have often grown), any efforts at "regionalism" is viewed with rightful suspicion. Remember this was tried a few years ago in Northeast Ohio. A far-flung suburb of Cleveland, called Avon, a couple counties over, got a proposal from a developer to build a new suburban office complex. But Cleveland, which was a member of the regional planning board, threatened to veto the deal unless Avon agreed to "share its tax revenues" with Cleveland.

Suburban residents and business spent quite a lot of time, effort, and money in trying to escape Dayton City Hall... they are rightfully going to push back against any attempt by Nan trying to get her hands back in suburban worker's pockets.

Anyone who actually Thought Austin Landing = Job Growth: I think it would be fair to put you, OHKID, in this last category? If that was the case, then clearly Austin Landing failed - but I would argue, based on my points above, that regional job growth was never Randy Gunlock's goal.
Ok, I have some time to give this due diligence (mainly finding the articles was what I wanted to do).

Yep, I was in the last category. Exactly why I've been dubbing Austin Landing a failure haha. Randy Gunlock and community leaders promised job growth. Here's some old articles where they specifically lie:
Business leaders discuss Austin interchange development at forum - Dayton Business Journal
‘We’re here to serve’ Randy Gunlock sees Austin Landing as... | www.daytondailynews.com
Austin Landing likely home to 1M sq.ft. of retail, offices - Dayton Business Journal
Austin project could drive development far beyond interchange | www.daytondailynews.com

And you have a good point later when you state Kroger et al came to the intersection and created new jobs. That they did, although some of them may have come without the intersection or felt the pressure to squeeze in by the Dayton Mall. So I'm still not a fan - this development COULD have been done a lot better. If it were truly modeled after Union Centre, at least the jobs would have come from new sources instead of the same old companies already operating in Dayton. Especially if it would have been better marketed as an ideal location between Cincinnati, Columbus, and Dayton.
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Old 07-11-2014, 06:40 AM
 
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Exclusive: Financial firm expected to move to Austin Landing - Dayton Business Journal
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:36 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Getting backto regionalism, the D-BJ article s linked up thread reported on two aspects of this but there is a third, the prioritization process for federal and state funds convened by the Dayton Development Coalition and MVRPC. This is sort of a lobbying effort to the state/federal politicaldelegations that puts some rationality into pork barrel spending requests,but also consolidating these requests into a regional wish list.

This actually has received some national attention, too (recall reading about atsome national political site somewhere--- Slate? Politico? WSJ? ---a few years back, back when earmarking was getting some media attention

Its also more authentically regional since,unlike ED/GE, it crosses county lines. ED/GE was really more of a revenue-sharing initiative that had the side-benefit as a confidence builder and learning experience for interjurisdicitional cooperation.

Here 's some links to that regional prioritization process, from the MVRPC and the Dayton Development Coalition:

PDAC Process | Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission

Priority Process - Dayton Development Coalition
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Old 07-13-2014, 08:18 PM
 
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Very cool! I actually have been under the assumption for a while that Ed/GE was the municipal funding standard... Glad to hear I am wrong and that we may be ahead of the curve!
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Old 07-17-2014, 05:45 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Here’s two ways of looking at regionalism.

The first is a link to some FCC maps that show broadcast coverage (apparently developed during the switch-over from analog broadcasting) for Dayton stations. T
he map also shows the Nielsen Designated Market Area (DMA) at that time. So this is probably the maximum definition of the Dayton region…which bleeds over into the Richmond area in Indiana, and extends as far north as Mercer and Auglaize counties (these seem to drop in and out of the market area, depending on how and when it’s being defined):

http://transition.fcc.gov/dtv/markets/maps_current/Dayton_OH.pdf

…you can see this type of media market regionalism reflected on the TV weather maps, the counties they show when they do the weather reports.

Next is the Miami Valley Conservancy District… probably the most extensive regional governmental entity in the region…which somewhat overlaps the broadcast and media market territory"

http://miamiconservancy.org/water/popups/gmrw_map.html

The Conservancy District is probably the best example of trying to foster a regional consciousness, using the Great Miami watershed as a conceptual framework for recreation, conservation, etc., as a corollary to their flood control mission
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Old 07-17-2014, 05:47 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Default The Poetics of Regionalism

.for me this is pretty dry stuff, and these hopes for regional governance seem pretty futile and not worth bothering about.

Im getting more into the poetics of regionalism, what the Germans call heimat.

Which is a complicated concept to really define in English as its a layering of memory, landscape and terrain, the environment (both the natural, agricultural, and built environment), as well as cultural, social, and economic factors. At heart this is, for me, somewhat of an aesthetic concept, the sense of place, the appreciation of place in all its facets and nuances, and what makes this place perhaps different and special.

Something Im really paying attention to now that Im taking country road rides on my bike, noticing the landscape and terrain more, and appreciating the character for the small towns and country villagesmaking a point of stopping in these places for food & drink and to look around. Something I've done on country road driving, but now I'm slowing down, stopping, savoring the sense of place.
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Old 07-23-2014, 04:24 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Here's a good example of an ad-hoc regional planning attempt along I-75...a mix of private and public players are involved:


Battling I-75 sprawl: Where do we grow from here?

New plan looks at future of Warren County's 75 corridor | WVXU

And a link to a set of .pdfs for detail:


Untitled Page

What's interesting is that this plan stops short of Franklin and Union Center.
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
.for me this is pretty dry stuff, and these hopes for regional governance seem pretty futile and not worth bothering about.

Im getting more into the poetics of regionalism, what the Germans call heimat.

Which is a complicated concept to really define in English as its a layering of memory, landscape and terrain, the environment (both the natural, agricultural, and built environment), as well as cultural, social, and economic factors. At heart this is, for me, somewhat of an aesthetic concept, the sense of place, the appreciation of place in all its facets and nuances, and what makes this place perhaps different and special.

Something Im really paying attention to now that Im taking country road rides on my bike, noticing the landscape and terrain more, and appreciating the character for the small towns and country villagesmaking a point of stopping in these places for food & drink and to look around. Something I've done on country road driving, but now I'm slowing down, stopping, savoring the sense of place.
You brought up a very good point that is often not considered in this conversation - the mixture of distinct local identities into one collective pot.

Because supposedly that's what will happen. And it did happen in most suburban (or really, any developed) place. The previous culture was displaced to make way for the new norm dictated by the standards of "modern" society at that particular frame in time.
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Old 02-15-2015, 09:08 AM
 
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Posted this article here because regional cooperation (or lack of cooperation) with retail corridors will, in my opinion, become increasingly vital to the perceived health and well being of the region:

New retail developments to change the region

And a lot of new stuff is going up. I'd like to believe there's a market for it, but we'll see.
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Old 02-15-2015, 09:29 AM
 
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There isn't if you ask me. Retail around me is so bad, because everything is going up 2-10 minutes away and taking all of the business with it.
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