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Old 06-09-2015, 03:15 PM
 
1,328 posts, read 1,047,169 times
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NCR CEO Bill Nuti says leaving Dayton was 'a great move' | Dayton | www.daytondailynews.com

Of course it was great. He got paid a ton of money twice to move them.
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Old 06-10-2015, 10:08 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,742 posts, read 8,803,017 times
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Although I no longer live there, it was a stake in the heart to see NCR leave Dayton. I am a sixth-generation Ohioan, and many of my family members worked for NCR at one time or another. As a family historian, I often peruse the real estate listings for East Dayton, looking for homes where my ancestors lived. It's stunning to see how much property taxes have risen in the past few years. Losing the city's major corporate citizens has taken a huge toll on the residents of Dayton proper.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
As a family historian, I often peruse the real estate listings for East Dayton, looking for homes where my ancestors lived.
Do you often find that the house your ancestor lived in is no longer there?

If the house is there, do you ever use google street view to look at it?

Many, once wonderful houses are now owned by out-of-state owners who let them run down.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:58 PM
 
Location: The analog world
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Many of the houses were in South Park, Walnut Hills, and St. Anne's Hill and are still standing, but the one that really hurts was torn down for U.S. 35. I have a photograph of it in my research files. Yes, most of them are really run-down now. It's pretty disheartening. The house where my grandparents lived when my ffather was born is in Twin Towers and looks like a meth den today.
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Old 06-11-2015, 04:08 PM
 
1,007 posts, read 909,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWOH View Post
This time for pigs:

Piglets flee overturned truck near Dayton, Ohio - BBC News

Poor little guys. Hope the ones hurt can make it through ok.
Did you really need to come on CD and squeal about this?
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Old 06-11-2015, 08:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Yes, most of them are really run-down now.
Do you see any likelihood that some of them might still be in good enough shape to re-hab?

I went to the NETR Online • Historic Aerials site and purchased a couple of pictures (*) in the Oregon & S. Park area from 1968 and 1956. Then, I positioned them identically and made a web page that allows me to rapidly switch between the two views.

I also took the 1956 picture and manually drew the border where the standing houses and roads were trashed and it's just incredible how the freeway sucked the life out of the area. That footprint is easily 2x wider than it needed to be if one was interested in preserving neighborhoods.

The freeway not only destroyed the areas that were torn down, but destroyed areas for many blocks N and S of the road. Some of the dumpiest parts of E Dayton are 5-10 blocks away, but were probably not ( but might have ended up that way anyway ).

Growing up, I just thought of those blighted areas as "drive-by" parts of town that just needed to be flattened. I'm sure that most people felt that way and still do.

(*) I purchased three pictures from them. One was a trial and I didn't get what I expected and thought it was a rip-off. The other two mentioned were purchased because there is no other way I could have got the shots. At $20 a pop, I won't be buying any more pictures. For $20 you should be able to get a heck of a lot more than 1800 x 1800 pixels.

If they just allowed you to sign up for $100 a year or something and then download what you wanted from their database, I would be all over that. Being an aerial nerd, I would probably pay even more than that, but the way they do it now, they aren't getting any more revenue from me.

It's a shame because it could be a great resource.
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Old 06-11-2015, 10:20 PM
 
Location: The analog world
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There was one on Epworth in Walnut Hills with incredible potential, and I think someone did purchase that one and rehab it. The Twin Towers home is a wreck. Zillow had photos of the interior from a recent attempt to sell, and it is just destroyed from floor to ceiling. Very sad.
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Old 06-11-2015, 10:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
The Twin Towers home is a wreck.
Twin Towers has a bunch of historically decent houses that are going to go the same route with some out-of-state landlord who'll rent it out till it's in the same condition as your ancestors' home is.

That neighborhood is full of those awful government-build-so-some-low-life-can-ruin-it houses.

It would be best if they just let that land return to forest or farm instead of putting up those low-income monsters. Some politician is making money off these junk houses.

They've been trying this for 75 years and it never works to give away property to people with no skin in the game.
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Old 06-12-2015, 04:14 PM
 
3,515 posts, read 3,791,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weatherphotographer View Post
Did you really need to come on CD and squeal about this?
hahaha!

Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent
There was one on Epworth in Walnut Hills with incredible potential, and I think someone did purchase that one and rehab it. The Twin Towers home is a wreck. Zillow had photos of the interior from a recent attempt to sell, and it is just destroyed from floor to ceiling. Very sad.
Interesting, thanks for the insight! Sad to hear about the Twin Towers house though. There are some people there making a push for it to revitalize (from a location standpoint it's up next), but its current population is holding it back.
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Old 06-14-2015, 12:50 PM
 
1,842 posts, read 1,377,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWOH View Post
Sad to hear about the Twin Towers house though. There are some people there making a push for it to revitalize (from a location standpoint it's up next), but its current population is holding it back.
So is the current city government ( holding the neighborhood back, that is ).


Sadly, it appears that it doesn't pay to fix up the old Dayton homes. Many of the fixed-up homes are in foreclosure or pre-forclosure, according to the real estate sites.

One of the reasons that the old homes aren't very valuable is the terrible awful low-income homes that are erected with Federal money to buy votes for the high-tax political machine that has trashed the city over our lifetimes.

These all look the same, are shoddily-built, and are given to residents who don't care and won't take care of the property.

There will be no revitalization where these clunkers are erected because no one in their right mind would invest their own money anywhere near one of these properties. It was known decades ago that just giving people a place to live results in a property that will quickly become a trashed piece of crap because they have no skin in the game.

This kind of thing keeps happening because it buys votes and that's all. No one really cares about the poor people looking for a place to live. It's just that the Federal money feels so good going down.

If they would allow the lots to go to seed, so to speak, after a while, there would be enough contiguous land that a developer could risk money and build stuff that private residents would risk their own money to have a place to live.

This is an ironic picture where a line of these nasty structures frames the "Twin Towers" that give this once decent neighborhood its name.
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