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Old 10-26-2015, 10:33 AM
 
6,127 posts, read 3,275,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
In my opinion, the great and abiding malady is the Ohio-wide system of local income taxes (and school-district taxes). If Ohio abolished all local income taxes and adopted one comprehensive state-wide income tax (as is, to my knowledge, done by most states), then the monetary disadvantage of living in Dayton City (vs. an outlying township) would disappear.
Definitely one of the reasons I left Ohio for Washington state. I've got an extra $400/month in my pocket due to no state or local income taxes. And my money goes further shopping in Oregon with no sales tax.
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:36 PM
 
6,824 posts, read 4,415,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
A "state" is a nation. The U.S. is a federation of nations with rather widely differing histories, cultures and to an extent even languages.
And that's our core problem in America today. We have overlapping, redundant and conflicting layers of government. We have rampant parochialism amongst the states and even within states. This was unavoidable in 1789, but today we have electronic communication and jet aircraft and interstate highways. Today, people move from upstate New York State to Dallas to Seattle, chasing jobs and better real-estate markets and lower taxes. Today the origin of immigrants 10 generations ago is utterly irrelevant, as is the geographic distribution of their settlement throughout America.

I completely disagree with the assertion that today the various states remain fundamentally distinct from each other, in terms of culture and prevailing values. Rather, the great emerging difference amongst Americans is rural vs. urban, not East Coast vs. Midwest or South or West. Metropolitan Boston, Cincinnati, Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix and even Salt Lake City have vastly more mutually in common, than say rural western Massachusetts and Boston, or the Appalachian counties of Ohio and Columbus.

I say instead that from the viewpoint of national competitiveness and revitalization of industry, fixing our educational system, solving the entitlement-crisis, and on and on, the true solution can only be at the national level, and true transformation at the national level is only possible if we become a unitary nation and not a confederation of 50 mini-nations.
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Old 10-26-2015, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,122,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
And that's our core problem in America today. We have overlapping, redundant and conflicting layers of government. We have rampant parochialism amongst the states and even within states. This was unavoidable in 1789, but today we have electronic communication and jet aircraft and interstate highways. Today, people move from upstate New York State to Dallas to Seattle, chasing jobs and better real-estate markets and lower taxes. Today the origin of immigrants 10 generations ago is utterly irrelevant, as is the geographic distribution of their settlement throughout America.

I completely disagree with the assertion that today the various states remain fundamentally distinct from each other, in terms of culture and prevailing values. Rather, the great emerging difference amongst Americans is rural vs. urban, not East Coast vs. Midwest or South or West. Metropolitan Boston, Cincinnati, Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix and even Salt Lake City have vastly more mutually in common, than say rural western Massachusetts and Boston, or the Appalachian counties of Ohio and Columbus.

I say instead that from the viewpoint of national competitiveness and revitalization of industry, fixing our educational system, solving the entitlement-crisis, and on and on, the true solution can only be at the national level, and true transformation at the national level is only possible if we become a unitary nation and not a confederation of 50 mini-nations.

Ah, the wonders of federal....

Social security is federal and is useful to a good many people. The government says to go to any office, and you can.

There's an office in downtown Cincinnati across the river from the apartment house underfoot here. One walks in through the careful gaze and examination of security, goes upstairs and pokes in something (don't even remember what now) for identification and sits down to wait to be called to be routed to a "right" person. Thereafter one waits for the right person to call. It may take someone two-three hours to get out of there but one does get out. Public transportation for the southbank is across the street. At least that's the way it was the last time I was there.

There is also an office in Florence, Kentucky. It's approximately 12 miles from the apartment house underfoot. You can just walk in, smile at the guard along the other side of the room, and sit, but it had better be simple because for anything complicated they would like an appointment, thank you. That's understandable since, if someone drives a few miles to get there, he/she may get a bit unhappy if there are too many people ahead of him/her, which can happen with a walk-in system. Public transportation is a bit of a walk and one is liable to stand the whole 12 miles as the thing goes to a big mall.

A few years ago in a small get-together a little lady who was diagnosed with cancer mentioned problems with money. Well, she could apply for SSI, but her doctor advised her not to get involved in such things (maybe confusing it with Medicaid). A rather out-spoken woman in the group told her in no uncertain terms that she had every right to apply for whatever and she should go to her doctors ("Now, you go tell him....") and item by item she listed necessary things quite vehemently.

At that point she ran out of breath, so I up and said, "And, when you get all that, go into Cincinnati...." at which point I shut up as the declaration from across the table was vehement enough to have been heard in Cincinnati: "THIS IS KENTUCKY!" (Never mind that said office is twelve miles away, etc.) Paperwork has to be kept somewhere, but, as mentioned above, the government itself says go to any office. They do transfer papers, and in my opinion going to Cincinnati is the better idea. You go whenever you can get there, and if you aren't carrying anything security sends you right through.

Now, tell me again how, if everything is federalized, what state you are in isn't going to make any difference because that already doesn't matter in any metropolitan area ... such as Greater Cincinnati, which has an international airport as well as half-million people on the southbank.

.
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Old 10-26-2015, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,013,856 times
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Growing up in Cincinnati, although I was clearly from Kentucky and we had a low opinion of Ohio drivers (FIFO - "****ing Idiot From Ohio"), we were nevertheless clearly part of the Cincinnati metro area.

But there are key differences between Northern Kentucky and Dayton.

Northern KY, with the possible exceptions of the river cities Ludlow, Covington, Newport, etc.... don't have any really old areas. Almost everything else is suburban in nature - very white, very middle to upper-middle class, and consequently very Republican and conservative.

The area is even more divided into a number of little fiefdoms - Park Hills? Kenton Vale? Southgate? Some of them have as little as 150 residents and they're still incorporated as discrete entities. But with the exception of PDS (Planning and Development Services of Kenton County, formerly the NKAPC), there's no concerted attempt at regionalism.

Ever wonder why? It's because there's no large core city that is trying to reach its hands into the pockets of suburban taxpayers. Even the NKAPC was ridiculed by residents as a baldfaced attempt at regionalism, which is why it was rightly scaled back to just Kenton County. Although some jurisdictions have played around with merging police forces, it's been hit and miss at best.

There isn't a tax in the history of this country that the Democrats haven't liked, advocated, or voted for. There are mercifully few elected Democrats in Northern Kentucky... so regionalism is a nonstarter. Boone County chose not to join NKAPC in 1961 and in the early 1980s Campbell County voters passed a ballot initiative that eliminated funding for regional planning.

Last edited by hensleya1; 10-26-2015 at 09:55 PM..
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:52 AM
 
6,824 posts, read 4,415,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
Ah, the wonders of federal....

Now, tell me again how, if everything is federalized, what state you are in isn't going to make any difference because that already doesn't matter in any metropolitan area ... such as Greater Cincinnati, which has an international airport as well as half-million people on the southbank.
I'm not sure that I understood. Is the point that, even for federal programs, local implementation will vary from place to place, and in particular, that offices of federal agencies will behave differently in large cities, than in small towns?

If so, then my solution would be:

1. Federal (or more properly, national) offices would be staffed by persons recruited nationwide, educated in one centralized school/college/academy/whatever, and then deployed to locations far from their homes of record.

2. Employees would be relocated every few years, so that in no circumstances does anyone become locally rooted.

3. Because all employees in any field-office are alien to the local culture, in no case would there be local parochialism or chumminess.


In my system, there really wouldn't be such a thing as state or local officials, save for national appointees, who are rotated from posting to posting, and are never allowed to "homestead" in the locale of their birth. In effect, I'd run civilian agencies like the military is currently run. Military bases don't differ much amongst each other.
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Old 11-09-2015, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,013,856 times
Reputation: 2334
Marco Rubio: Cut Federal Gas Tax By 80%, End Mass Transit Subsidies
Quote:
Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) is calling for the 18.4 cents-per-gallon gas tax that pays for most federal transportation projects to be cut by 80 percent. The 2016 presidential hopeful said in a post on his campaign website that the gas tax should be cut because it is "outdated" and replaced by a system that allows states to take the lead on financing transportation projects.

Rubio's plan promises he will "reduce the federal gasoline tax rate by 80 percent" and "veto any gas-tax increase." The plan also says he will call on lawmakers to "repeal the Davis-Bacon Act that inflates government costs by billions every year and is a giveaway of taxpayer dollars to labor unions" and "phase out the Mass Transit Account, which loots the Highway Trust Fund."
The last line in bold is of particular interest to me, as this is a position I've been advocating for a long time. It's time that the federal government stop siphoning off much-needed gas tax dollars away from roads and towards pork barrel transit projects that only benefit a select few who live in the city core.

Coincidentally enough, the most effective way to plug the highway fund shortfall is to end the Mass Transit Account and put the money back where it belongs... on roads.

It's time that transit users in the city stop being subsidized and supported on the backs of suburban taxpayers who are liable to drive the furthest and thus pay the most in road tax. If the city residents want to build a transit system, they can pay for it.
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Old 11-09-2015, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,122,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Marco Rubio: Cut Federal Gas Tax By 80%, End Mass Transit Subsidies
The last line in bold is of particular interest to me, as this is a position I've been advocating for a long time. It's time that the federal government stop siphoning off much-needed gas tax dollars away from roads and towards pork barrel transit projects that only benefit a select few who live in the city core.

Coincidentally enough, the most effective way to plug the highway fund shortfall is to end the Mass Transit Account and put the money back where it belongs... on roads.

It's time that transit users in the city stop being subsidized and supported on the backs of suburban taxpayers who are liable to drive the furthest and thus pay the most in road tax. If the city residents want to build a transit system, they can pay for it.

A transit system is there for everyone, i.e., anyone. If you don't want to use it, that's your business alone. Further, when a non-driver takes a cab, he/she is paying the same as you through the taxi company.

A library is there for everyone, i.e., anyone. If you don't want to use it, that's your business alone, too.

.
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Old 11-09-2015, 07:23 PM
 
1,691 posts, read 1,592,810 times
Reputation: 1168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Marco Rubio: Cut Federal Gas Tax By 80%, End Mass Transit Subsidies
The last line in bold is of particular interest to me, as this is a position I've been advocating for a long time. It's time that the federal government stop siphoning off much-needed gas tax dollars away from roads and towards pork barrel transit projects that only benefit a select few who live in the city core.

Coincidentally enough, the most effective way to plug the highway fund shortfall is to end the Mass Transit Account and put the money back where it belongs... on roads.

It's time that transit users in the city stop being subsidized and supported on the backs of suburban taxpayers who are liable to drive the furthest and thus pay the most in road tax. If the city residents want to build a transit system, they can pay for it.
Let's take 100 bus off the roads and replace them with 2000 cars. Then we can use the saved $$ to add more lanes to every highway in order to handle the extra traffic.

That's surely a winning idea.
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Old 11-09-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,013,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
A transit system is there for everyone, i.e., anyone. If you don't want to use it, that's your business alone. Further, when a non-driver takes a cab, he/she is paying the same as you through the taxi company.

A library is there for everyone, i.e., anyone. If you don't want to use it, that's your business alone, too.

.
Tell me how many Centerville residents use RTA to get to their job near Austin Landing?

Or how many Kettering/Beavercreek residents use RTA to get to WPAFB?
(Hint: the answer to this one is definitely "zero" because there is only one bus that even enters the base and it goes straight from the hub.)

Or how many workers actually use route 1 to get to their job on Pentagon Boulevard?

The answer to all of these is either "zero" or extremely close to zero. The bus is inaccessible, incompatible, or undesirable for many Dayton area residents... but everyone in the county has to pony up in sales and property taxes to subsidize the transit system.

I'm not advocating abolishing the transit system altogether - but I'm tired of watching subsidies account for 86% of its operating budget. It's time transit users acknowledge the full cost of each trip taken on public transit - which in the case of a bus is closer to $10 or $12 per trip.

The capital cost of building a facility and buying vehicles is not cheap. Maintaining them is not cheap. And hiring professional drivers is not cheap. Transit isn't a bad idea per se - but it's time that suburban residents who never use it stop having to pay for someone else's benefit.
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Old 11-09-2015, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,122,462 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Tell me how many Centerville residents use RTA to get to their job near Austin Landing?

Or how many Kettering/Beavercreek residents use RTA to get to WPAFB?
(Hint: the answer to this one is definitely "zero" because there is only one bus that even enters the base and it goes straight from the hub.)

Or how many workers actually use route 1 to get to their job on Pentagon Boulevard?

Probably as many as those who chose to live close to their jobs (or classes) and walk to work are using it.

Another 2,000 cars on the road is a valid comment, to which I presently chose to take time to add:

1. Yes, indeed, let's import more oil from the middle east so people in those nations can buy up more of this nation, and

2. There are about 75 parking spaces for the old folks' home apartment house underfoot here (as anyone who can bring up a satellite map can see) all full of cars owned by residents who fit into an old folks' home. (I know of one person of the 175 or so people, a once professional driver, who decided he was too old to be driving so he sold his car to someone who happened to come up dead two years ago.) So to the above additional 2,000 cars on the road one can add the cost of six more ambulance crews and three more squad cars to local budgets (including some suburban ones) plus attendant Medicare costs (especially those that ultimately switch over to Medicaid).

PS: If you had invested in tables made of just wood (like ordinary people) instead of ones with marble tops maybe you wouldn't notice the taxes so much.

.

Last edited by CarpathianPeasant; 11-09-2015 at 09:53 PM..
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