U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Dayton
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-13-2015, 04:55 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,321 posts, read 10,582,073 times
Reputation: 2395

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by notnamed View Post
Where in WA were you? I just moved to Vancouver, WA in the southwest from Dayton. I understand they just use sand here when necessary and that's very rare as they don't get much accumulating snow here just rain all winter. Just have the option to go visit snow in the mountains as you want.
I was in the Puget Sound, between Olympia and Tacoma. We had snow every year except my first winter there, which just rained for 30 consecutive days. Puget Sound actually does get snow between Dec-Mar. With all the hills and lack of road maint, it just makes life a nightmare. I lived in a town with a series of up and down hills I couldn't get traction on, so there was a week I had to take the bus to work. Buses had chains which limited them to 35 mph. Took me 1.5 hours for a 7 mile commute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-13-2015, 04:58 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,321 posts, read 10,582,073 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post
Snow tires? Cars today have radial tires which will do just fine, when I think of snow tires it reminds me of what we put on the back of our rear wheel drive cars when I started driving in the 1970s when we were still using bias-ply tires which were terrible in the snow.

Stick shift >>>automatics in the snow, much easier to rock yourself out when you get stuck.

It's a lighter weight oil that you want to use in the cold weather, one thing to consider is what is in your gear box, I have driven stick shift cars most of my life, my 1984 Chevette used 75W-90 gear lube, shifting in single digit weather was like stirring molasses. My 1992 Dodge Caravan used 10W-30 motor oil so I filled the gear box with synthetic oil and it shifted easily on the coldest days, even with the cable shifter.

ETA: There are no places that do undercoating for rust prevention due to road salt, there are places in Maine and Canada that spray a gel substance under cars to prevent rust, but spray rubberized coatings can hold moisture and make the underside of a car rust faster than doing nothing.
People still use snow tires in certain areas, like eastern WA state, where they do get heavy snow. And Ziebart does undercoating for cars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2015, 11:29 AM
 
6,103 posts, read 3,266,484 times
Reputation: 8333
Yeah and they're better called winter tires than snow. All sorts of advantages in cold weather due to the softer compound they are made of having better grip. In mountainous areas of WA you're required to have tire chains or AWD + traction tires.

In performance cars it's not uncommon for folks to have dedicated summer and winter setups.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2015, 12:55 PM
 
3,514 posts, read 3,781,531 times
Reputation: 1808
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobolt View Post
People still use snow tires in certain areas, like eastern WA state, where they do get heavy snow. And Ziebart does undercoating for cars.
Ziebart is around here too, honestly your car should be ok but if you wanted to you could go for the undercoating.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2015, 08:38 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,321 posts, read 10,582,073 times
Reputation: 2395
Thank you all for your comments and feedback! You've been so helpful!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2015, 01:42 PM
 
6,103 posts, read 3,266,484 times
Reputation: 8333
The first time we took our 2009 RAV4 in for service here in WA they actually wrote up the surface rust under the car because it is so rare to see here. I've snapped off a couple bolt heads trying to take some rusted ones off on prior cars. But mechanics are used to that sort of stuff there.

The Canadians swear by Krown, which there is an installer for that not too far away in Versailles.
https://www.krown.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2015, 03:18 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,538 posts, read 42,708,506 times
Reputation: 57184
Everyone needs to just get a grip. I lived in NE Ohio for 40+ years and never had snow tires and never had 4 wheel drive. What I did have was northern winter street smarts, which is what you learn when you must get somewhere in the snow, and you survive.

All you do in the winter is go slow, double your stopping distance, leave early, don't go anywhere you do not need to until the roads have been cleared, and you will learn how to drive in it. If you give the street crews time to do their jobs, you will be fine with whatever kind of car you drive.

Ohioans are awesome. OP will like it. There is a reason why anyone even bothers to live with Ohio weather. Its the people.

Last edited by gentlearts; 11-15-2015 at 03:27 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2015, 05:08 PM
 
6,817 posts, read 4,410,206 times
Reputation: 11929
My winter-beater is an old Mazda Miata. It's a RWD sports car, with low ground-clearance. For a car like that, dedicated snow-tires (winter usage only) are essential. Oh, and I live in the remote countryside.

For a Corolla, snow-tires are unnecessary. 4-season passenger radials are perfectly adequate, especially if the OP will be living in Beavercreek, and commuting to Area B. The greatest "danger" of such a wintertime commute is that the car's engine won't have sufficient time to warm up. Day after day, the car will have endured repeated cycles of cold-weather operation, never being run for sufficiently long to burn off deposits, or boil off water-vapor.

As others have said, there are numerous rental-complexes in Beavercreek. Avoid the apartments immediately to the east of Area B (National Road), as that's Fairborn - a different jurisdiction, which is relatively high-tax. Depending on one's salary, it might be cheaper to pay $100 or $150/month extra to rent in Beavercreek, in exchange for the local tax "loophole".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,321 posts, read 10,582,073 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
My winter-beater is an old Mazda Miata. It's a RWD sports car, with low ground-clearance. For a car like that, dedicated snow-tires (winter usage only) are essential. Oh, and I live in the remote countryside.

For a Corolla, snow-tires are unnecessary. 4-season passenger radials are perfectly adequate, especially if the OP will be living in Beavercreek, and commuting to Area B. The greatest "danger" of such a wintertime commute is that the car's engine won't have sufficient time to warm up. Day after day, the car will have endured repeated cycles of cold-weather operation, never being run for sufficiently long to burn off deposits, or boil off water-vapor.

As others have said, there are numerous rental-complexes in Beavercreek. Avoid the apartments immediately to the east of Area B (National Road), as that's Fairborn - a different jurisdiction, which is relatively high-tax. Depending on one's salary, it might be cheaper to pay $100 or $150/month extra to rent in Beavercreek, in exchange for the local tax "loophole".
Good point about the car engine. So I take it my commute won't be long enough to avoid that. Is there a way to mitigate that "danger" say, run the car longer (warm up time) or does the car need to be in drive mode to burn off deposits/boil off water vapor?

I am sticking with Beavercreek. I'm already moving from a state that doesn't tax income to one that does, and that will hurt. I need to keep taxes as low as I can and if that means living in Beavercreek, that's just fine.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2015, 01:55 AM
 
874 posts, read 1,028,771 times
Reputation: 695
Are you working on base as military or as a civilian? If you are military, you don't have to pay state income tax on military pay.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Dayton
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top