U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Dayton
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-20-2016, 12:00 PM
 
1,614 posts, read 595,609 times
Reputation: 1537

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
So I suppose now would be a good time to ask if anybody gives a whit about these posts. Looks like the thread is being read, but you all are verrrry quiet. Can anybody else chime in with information that would add to the conversation? I mean, I'm enjoying myself, but I feel a bit like one hand clapping. Come on...somebody out there has to have at least a little curiosity about another prominent Dayton family. Or maybe there's a house you drive by on your way to work that you've always wondered about. Let's find out who lived there and learn something about our city's history. It's good stuff!
I find it fascinating! I am a local history buff, but I have never seen a treatment, in books, newspaper articles, etc of what happened to the descendants of Dayton's great industrialists and inventors, which is odd, because Dayton decidedly had a Silicon Valley vibe going on in the late nineteenth be early twentieth centuries. Keep posting!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-20-2016, 12:26 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertbrianbush View Post
I find it fascinating! I am a local history buff, but I have never seen a treatment, in books, newspaper articles, etc of what happened to the descendants of Dayton's great industrialists and inventors, which is odd, because Dayton decidedly had a Silicon Valley vibe going on in the late nineteenth be early twentieth centuries. Keep posting!
I think I may need to take a break for awhile today, because my eyes are starting to cross from all this time staring at a screen. I promise to come back and post about the Ohmers next. I'm also thinking about the Huffmans and perhaps the Schantzes, although I get a little scared of what that might entail. Those families just seem way too big to give a succinct overview. The Schencks might be interesting. I had a teacher named Schenck, and I've always wondered about her....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 01:47 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
Well, shoot, I just can't leave this alone. A post at the DHOL Facebook page made me double-check my Sherman notes, and I think I have the house on Philadelphia attributed to the wrong Sherman. Bear with me. I need to go back through my research. Stay tuned...

Last edited by randomparent; 01-20-2016 at 03:14 PM.. Reason: Typo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
Back to the beginning with the Shermans...

There were two Shermans, brothers named John Q. & William C. associated with Standard Register. John was president, and William was vice president until John's death in 1939 when William assumed leadership of the company. William died in 1944 without issue.

This very large Catholic family has many descendants through John, who, with his wife, Katherine Neary, had nine children beginning in 1918 shortly after their marriage. They were as follows: John, William, Mary Catherine (Nushawg), James, Helen (Casey), Robert, Charles, Patricia (Begley), and Phillip, who died in infancy.

John Q and William both built Tudor Revival mansions near the Miami Valley Golf Club. William's home, located at 1231 Hook Estates Drive, is the smaller of the two and is listed on the National Registry. John's house is quite grand and is located (just to the north of William's house) at 2720 Philadelphia. If you use Google Maps, you can zoom in well enough to see it clearly. The James L. Sherman Family Trust currently owns John's home. William's house currently belongs to a physician, who might be a descendant...or not. Who knows? There are an awful lot of them!

The Shermans seem to have lived pretty quiet lives. I've not uncovered any newsworthy controversies or disasters. The family has been active in Catholic charities and have been involved with Good Samaritan Hospital for many years. Most are buried in Calvary Cemetery. As of 2014, James was the sole survivor of the first generation of children. Patricia, youngest daughter, had ten children, one of whom serves on Standard Register's Board of Directors. A second grandson also serves on the BoD. I think he might be James' son, but don't quote me on it.

Patriarch John Q.'s last will and testament is on-line if you'd like to take a look. Also, this 2007 Good Sam newsletter has a nice little piece about the Shermans on page 11.

Last edited by randomparent; 01-20-2016 at 05:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 06:16 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
BTW, once again I'd like to reiterate my commitment to the privacy of living descendants. If you think anything I've shared pushes the boundaries, please let me know, and I will make a request for the moderators to redact the post. I want to keep this fun and informative but also respectful. Thanks for reading!

Also, please forgive my typos. When I reread my posts, I'm often horrified at the things I missed when editing. I blame my advancing age and continuing resistance to getting a new pair of glasses. And autocorrect. That works, right?

Last edited by randomparent; 01-20-2016 at 06:31 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 08:29 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
A little more on the Pattersons...

John H. Patterson's daughter, Dorothy, married a third time in 1933 to Howell Edmunds Jackson of Virginia. I believe Howell to be the grandson of a prominent politician and jurist from Tennessee also named Howell Edmunds Jackson through his son, Henry Shepherd Jackson. The senior Howell Edmunds Jackson served on the Supreme Court beginning in 1893.

Dorothy and Howell raised race horses at Bull Run Farms, including a very successful Bay horse called Baldric. Howell's death certificate lists him as a retired industrialist, but I have found only references to his involvement in horse racing.

Dorothy and Howell are buried in Sharon, Virginia.

Dorothy's estate was the subject of a legal case study currently held at Dayton Public Library.

Just recently, the Dayton Art Institute hosted an exhibit of baroque drawings gifted by Dorothy Patterson Jackson in 1976.

Last edited by randomparent; 01-21-2016 at 09:40 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 09:34 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
And back to the mess that was Frederick Patterson's legacy...

Where we last left off, Frederick was married to his second wife, Armenal, and raising cattle near Tucson, Arizona. His daughters with Evelyn Huffman, Fredericka and Evelyn, who may or not have been adopted, were living with their mother in the hills south of Dayton, which at the time was still a patchwork of estates rather than the developed neighborhoods we have today. Their home had been a wedding gift to the young couple from his father, John.

But there's a little more to the story. When I found the 1917 wedding announcement for Frederick and Evelyn, a familiar name jumped out at me: Armenal Wood of New York, bridesmaid. Yep, Frederick ran off with Evelyn's friend! Newspaper clippings detailing his wedding to Armenal indicate that the ceremony took place just two weeks after Frederick's divorce from Evelyn was finalized. Not surprisingly, it was a decidedly less extravagant affair than his first wedding, with only a few family members in attendance. Hmmmm.

Now let's jump forward a few decades to Frederick's death in 1971 from kidney disease. He'd been living in Florida for a little more than a decade, and Armenal had been gone for five years. They had sold their three ranches in Arizona in 1959 and re-settled in Boynton Beach. Who is listed in his obituary? His survivors are his sister, Dorothy, and his step-children, Charles & Hayden, Armenal's children from her first marriage. There's no mention of Fredericka and Evelyn, who you'll remember had sued him for reneging on a financial agreement to provide each with $2M. Fascinating, huh?

Now, no doubt, someone will be curious about Frederick and Evelyn's house. The thing is I really don't know where it was located or if it still exists. Frederick tore down his father's house, a Swiss-chalet style home, and replaced with a French-inspired mansion that is now part of Lutheran Church of Our Savior. The 1930 census lists Evelyn, Fredericka, and little Evelyn's place of residence as being Far Hills, so maybe it was the large estate in Oakwood. John had another home at First and Ludlow that was raised in 1934 to make way for new development. (Note to self: check 1920 census for John H.) For further information about the various Patterson estates, read this blog post at Glancing Backwards.

Update: The Evelyn Huffman Patterson house is located at 245 Park Dr. It was struck by lightning in 2009, so I'm thinking that Evelyn and the girls lived in the mansion on Park Drive after the divorce, while Frederick took over his father's Swiss Chalet. The Park Drive house is probably the one John gifted to his son and Evelyn at their wedding.

In 1920, John H. Patterson was living in a home vaguely referred to as Spring Grove in the census. He had three females servants. I have no idea where this house might have been located in Oakwood.

Last edited by randomparent; 01-21-2016 at 11:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 10:00 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,445 times
Reputation: 15
Hi Random Parent and others,

Great research and write-ups, you set a high bar. I've been researching Col. Edward Deeds and his family. I got bit by the history bug and I'm trying to track down descendants to find more about the Colonel since I seem to be writing a bio on him.

You're wise to avoid naming living descendants. We all live in glass houses thanks to the web, but it can help long distance researchers. Some of the folks I've contacted worry how I found them. I think we're all still working out the etiquette of when not to Google someone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 10:13 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Expat View Post
Hi Random Parent and others,

Great research and write-ups, you set a high bar. I've been researching Col. Edward Deeds and his family. I got bit by the history bug and I'm trying to track down descendants to find more about the Colonel since I seem to be writing a bio on him.

You're wise to avoid naming living descendants. We all live in glass houses thanks to the web, but it can help long distance researchers. Some of the folks I've contacted worry how I found them. I think we're all still working out the etiquette of when not to Google someone.
It's a fine line. I've redacted some of my previous posts when I thought I was pushing the limit. These families are absolutely fascinating, and I think it's perfectly natural to be interested in what happened to succeeding generations, but there's a tremendous amount of pressure on the descendants, something I saw very clearly in the article I linked to about Evelyn Patterson Prescott's son. He got it from both sides of the family! While I can't stop others from connecting the dots to the current generation if they're so motivated, I don't want to paint a bull's eye on anybody. Please let me know if you think I've gone too far.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 12:27 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,547 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20848
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
John H. Patterson's daughter, Dorothy, married a third time in 1933 to Howell Edmunds Jackson of Virginia. I believe Howell to be the grandson of a prominent politician and jurist from Tennessee also named Howell Edmunds Jackson through his son, Henry Shepherd Jackson. The senior Howell Edmunds Jackson served on the Supreme Court beginning in 1893.
Correction: Found the marriage certificate. Dorothy and Howell were married in 1943 in Virginia. Howell is listed as a farmer rather than a retired industrialist as I found in his death certificate. Dorothy's second husband, Randolph Riger Santini, died in 1940, and accordingly, she is listed as a widow.

Backing up a bit, like her brother, Dorothy had also divorced and married again very quickly after a first marriage disintegrated. Here's how her marriage to husband number two, Randolph, played out in the press.

Both Dorothy and Howell Jackson were in their late-forties at the time of their marriage. I surmise from National Park Service documents relating to a historic district that they met when Dorothy bought property in 1938 that adjoined the Jackson's land in Farquier County, Virginia. Howell subsequently divorced his first wife, Vera, in 1942 to marry Dorothy. Ouch, poor Vera!

I also found an announcement of Dorothy's divorce from first husband, Noble Judah. They had two adopted daughters, twins named Katherine and Ann, who were born in 1923. Interesting that both Frederick and Dorothy Patterson adopted children, don't you think? Noble died in 1938, when the girls were just fifteen years old.

Last edited by randomparent; 01-21-2016 at 01:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Dayton
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top