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Old 03-14-2017, 02:03 PM
 
1,007 posts, read 907,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OccasionalCommentary2020 View Post
If the people lecturing you about safety are FROM Dayton, they're likely from the burbs ...And all they've heard on the news since the crack-crazed-80's is about Dayton's Detroitlike crime problems. (and Dayton's always been a satellite drug & gang hub for other cities off 75 between Florida and Michigan)

If they're part of the medical community, they or someone they know likely did rotations at Good Sam or Grandview at some point and heard about "someone at Good Sam" getting carjacked, car stolen, robbed, etc.

But a lot of people who move to Dayton are from tiny towns all over Ohio / Indiana making the crime they hear about on the news is a huge deal compared to where they're from. (but if you go back to their tiny towns everyone's probably wacked out on meth)

In all cases, the real crime gets magnified by everyone from Germantown claiming to be an expert on Dayton's crime.

Oh yeah and as far as integration... You're talking about a dozen or so balkanized suburbs where people from different suburbs don't even integrate. So the idea of people from the suburbs integrating with people in Dayton is a pipe dream that will likely never occur.
How do you know they are from the burbs? Are you with the census bureau?
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Old 03-14-2017, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
11,796 posts, read 9,715,656 times
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Originally Posted by weatherphotographer View Post
How do you know they are from the burbs? Are you with the census bureau?
You're from HH, right? Everyone I know who lives in the city itself loves it and doesn't obsess over the crime rate.
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Old 03-14-2017, 03:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
You're from HH, right? Everyone I know who lives in the city itself loves it and doesn't obsess over the crime rate.
But not everybody you refer to posts on CD
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:27 PM
 
6,824 posts, read 4,415,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OccasionalCommentary2020 View Post
If the people lecturing you about safety are FROM Dayton, they're likely from the burbs ...And all they've heard on the news since the crack-crazed-80's is about Dayton's Detroitlike crime problems. (and Dayton's always been a satellite drug & gang hub for other cities off 75 between Florida and Michigan)...
My formative years were spent in the cozy suburbs of Washington DC, back when DC was regarded as "the murder capital of America", well before the Defense boom and gentrification and all that. I also spent time in SE Michigan, not within Detroit itself, but not far. Crime and drugs were never of particular concern to me, either in Dayton or elsewhere, but I did notice architecture, transportation, pedestrian traffic on city sidewalks, and the general external manifestations of wealth or poverty. Dayton-city struck me as being reminiscent of a combination of early-1980s DC, and early-1990s Detroit... shuttered factories with tall grass growing through the once-paved parking lots, squat poorly-constructed houses in parlous state of decay. Oakwood reminded me of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan - or perhaps parts of Georgetown, in DC. Beavercreek, Bellbrook and Springboro are a bit like the western fringes of Fairfax County, VA, 35 years ago.

Whenever I visit the DC region, whether the inner city or the older suburbs or the newer ones, I'm struck by the immense growth, gentrification, upward direction of things. I don't get the same feeling in the Miami Valley, whether in Dayton-city or the suburbs.
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Old 03-16-2017, 04:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Whenever I visit the DC region, whether the inner city or the older suburbs or the newer ones, I'm struck by the immense growth, gentrification, upward direction of things. I don't get the same feeling in the Miami Valley, whether in Dayton-city or the suburbs.
You DO get a lot of that same feeling in Ohio's capital city ( most capital cities ). There is no coincidence why.
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Old 03-16-2017, 05:11 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,751,497 times
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I don't get the same feeling in the Miami Valley, whether in Dayton-city or the suburbs.

This is a weak-market metropolitan area with nearly zero growth, or measured in the low single digits. So what growth there is going to be limited to certain areas, as I'm sure you all have noticed. Other areas in the metro area remain stable or shrink/decline at varying rates.


The vibe here is very sleepy and slow-go, it seems. But ok if you like that laid-back/take-it-easy spirit. Makes for a nice pace of life in its own way, but good to get out of town every now and then (like to Cols or Cincy) to recharge the batteries.
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
This is a weak-market metropolitan area with nearly zero growth, or measured in the low single digits. So what growth there is going to be limited to certain areas, as I'm sure you all have noticed. Other areas in the metro area remain stable or shrink/decline at varying rates.
It is. But why? If quality of life is good, why isn’t quantity of life (so to speak) increasing? If tech-workers are tired of the commute in Northern Virginia, and housing prices there are exorbitant, and we have cloud-storage and ultra-fast internet etc., well, why aren’t those techy firms along I-66 relocating from Centerville, VA, to Centerville, OH? Why don’t we have Amazon, Google and Microsoft opening giant research-centers in Austin Landing? Note that I am specifically excluding Dayton-city politics from these hypotheticals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
The vibe here is very sleepy and slow-go, it seems. But ok if you like that laid-back/take-it-easy spirit. Makes for a nice pace of life in its own way, but good to get out of town every now and then (like to Cols or Cincy) to recharge the batteries.
I never understood this “vibe”. Is it not the case, that the Heartland is supposed to be replete with hard-working yeomen farmers, self-reliance, entrepreneurialism, and the ethic of assiduous workers advancing the course of the business for which they work, as if they were part-owners… the whole thing about taking pride in one’s work? If so, then ought it not be the case, that in Dayton – a city with impressively storied past of innovation, mechanization, industrialization – the pace should be humming? Instead, those effete garret-dwelling hippie artists on the East Coast ought to be lighting up their doobies, lounging on the couch, waddling with languid pace on sidewalks, sleepily pausing in their cars when the light turns green? Why is my reckoning exactly backwards?

And as for overall pace of life, again I’m baffled. How would a dentist in Beavercreek be any more relaxed or lackadaisical than one in San Francisco or NYC? Would a Dayton architect work fewer hours? Would a medical intern at Miami Valley hospital somehow be less harried than his counterpart at Massachusetts General? In other words, in what sense does local culture really affect how professions are practiced? A lawyer in Alabama might have a southern drawl, but would he/she not have to prepare for court, just as thoroughly as a lawyer in DC?
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Old 03-17-2017, 11:09 AM
 
1,007 posts, read 907,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I don't get the same feeling in the Miami Valley, whether in Dayton-city or the suburbs.

This is a weak-market metropolitan area with nearly zero growth, or measured in the low single digits. So what growth there is going to be limited to certain areas, as I'm sure you all have noticed. Other areas in the metro area remain stable or shrink/decline at varying rates.


The vibe here is very sleepy and slow-go, it seems. But ok if you like that laid-back/take-it-easy spirit. Makes for a nice pace of life in its own way, but good to get out of town every now and then (like to Cols or Cincy) to recharge the batteries.
The "rose colored glasses" crowd here needs to take a weekender to Indy. I bet they'll come back with a different attitude real quick.
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Old 03-17-2017, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Five Oaks
430 posts, read 447,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weatherphotographer View Post
The "rose colored glasses" crowd here needs to take a weekender to Indy. I bet they'll come back with a different attitude real quick.
I grew up in Indiana; I've been to and thru Indy more times that I can count.
You cannot compare Indy to Dayton. Indy has grown at the expense of other parts of Indiana; while the rest of the state begs for money for infrastructure, Indianapolis never wants for anything. Secondly, Indy is huge compared to Dayton. Compare Dayton to South Bend or Gary if you want to compare similar history and size.
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Old 03-18-2017, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
11,796 posts, read 9,715,656 times
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Indianapolis is most comparable to Columbus and Dayton reminds me of Fort Wayne (other than environmentally).
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