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Old 09-04-2017, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
135 posts, read 91,942 times
Reputation: 138

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There a lot of trucks on both 70 and 75 (it's the busiest interchange in the US), but that probably won't affect you unless you buy a house that backs up against the freeway. You can get around on surface streets for all your daily errands. Same with other suburbs along the freeways like Vandalia. And even if you do have to drive on the freeway, it's not terribly scary. I live in New England now, and driving on the freeway here is taking your life into your hands. Freeways in Ohio are a lot calmer and easier. But yeah, you can definitely avoid them if you'd prefer.
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Old 09-05-2017, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
504 posts, read 197,770 times
Reputation: 2121
I have lived in Centerville since 1995 and am planning to retire away from OH.

While true that costs of living here are much lower than what you are used to in CA, there is a good reason for that. The only way I would even consider sticking around is if I moved out of Montgomery County.

Beavercreek is in Greene County and is fine. Counties to the south of Centerville are also heads and shoulders above Montgomery County in terms of responsible city government and local services. Suburban school districts and the fiber of the communities are strong. None of these things can be said about Dayton.

Dayton is a fiscal black hole, white flight gutted the majority of it years ago, and the state's overall population (which may have temporarily plateaued) has been on a downward trend for decades. That means taxes are going up as the local politicos scramble to prop up their funding stream to support their pet projects. Daytonians and other local voters never met a tax levy they didn't love. As a personal example, my Centerville property taxes on a very modest 1970s 3-BR, 2B brick ranch increased 49% on last reassessment; the Montgomery County appeals process was a joke.

Note that these happy, smiling young people are in Springboro, OH, one of Dayton's south suburbs in Warren County: New Census show Dayton may have stopped population declines.

If buying a house for under $50,000 is your thing, welcome to Dayton. If you sell a decent house in CA, you could probably buy a mansion/estate in this area from the proceeds.

Last edited by OHNot4Me; 09-05-2017 at 05:33 AM..
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:55 AM
 
6 posts, read 8,089 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHNot4Me View Post
I have lived in Centerville since 1995 and am planning to retire away from OH.

While true that costs of living here are much lower than what you are used to in CA, there is a good reason for that. The only way I would even consider sticking around is if I moved out of Montgomery County.

Beavercreek is in Greene County and is fine. Counties to the south of Centerville are also heads and shoulders above Montgomery County in terms of responsible city government and local services. Suburban school districts and the fiber of the communities are strong. None of these things can be said about Dayton.

Dayton is a fiscal black hole, white flight gutted the majority of it years ago, and the state's overall population (which may have temporarily plateaued) has been on a downward trend for decades. That means taxes are going up as the local politicos scramble to prop up their funding stream to support their pet projects. Daytonians and other local voters never met a tax levy they didn't love. As a personal example, my Centerville property taxes on a very modest 1970s 3-BR, 2B brick ranch increased 49% on last reassessment; the Montgomery County appeals process was a joke.

Note that these happy, smiling young people are in Springboro, OH, one of Dayton's south suburbs in Warren County: New Census show Dayton may have stopped population declines.

If buying a house for under $50,000 is your thing, welcome to Dayton. If you sell a decent house in CA, you could probably buy a mansion/estate in this area from the proceeds.
yes i would be selling my property in ca but no i dont want a mansion. just a small 3 bedroom/2 bath home. so the rule of thumb would be to not buy in montgomery county. do you know what beavercreek property tax is like? cause ca property tax is no joke.
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Old 09-05-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
504 posts, read 197,770 times
Reputation: 2121
My best friends moved from Centerville to Beavercreek when he retired about 10 years ago. They have been very happy there and just laugh at me every time Montgomery County approves yet another tax levy.

You may find this website helpful:

https://www.co.greene.oh.us/385/Tax-Rates
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Old 09-05-2017, 01:16 PM
 
3,514 posts, read 3,780,583 times
Reputation: 1808
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitality1 View Post
yes i would be selling my property in ca but no i dont want a mansion. just a small 3 bedroom/2 bath home. so the rule of thumb would be to not buy in montgomery county. do you know what beavercreek property tax is like? cause ca property tax is no joke.
I wouldn't agree, and here is why:

Snapshot of property taxes by county tables

It's safe to figure about a 2.25% tax rate no matter where you go in the area
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Old 09-05-2017, 01:28 PM
 
6,815 posts, read 4,408,035 times
Reputation: 11918
The Dayton metro area is variegated and regional. Some areas are absolute dumps, vying with inner-city Detroit for its level of blight and dilapidation. Other areas are tony and sophisticated neigbborhoods. What holds inside Dayton-city doesn’t hold in its various adjoining suburbs – which themselves differ amongst each other – and in turn, doesn’t hold in the outlying suburbs, small towns and rural expanses.

The chief detriment to long-term living in Dayton, and the Midwest in general, is the stagnant housing prices. For a retiree, this presumably is moot. Schools matter for younger people, as do job opportunities. Again, for retirees, this is moot. Retirees have more options, potentially enjoying and thriving in an area where younger people might chafe and struggle.

Taxes in Ohio – income and property – also vary considerably with locale. Taxes are very different in Washington Township vs. Oakwood, though culturally the two areas compete. My recommendation would be to look at southwestern Greene County – Beavercreek, Bellbrook, Sugarcreek Township -for a transplanting retiree. In those jurisdictions, there are no local income taxes, though property taxes are somewhat higher than the average.

The cost-of-living calculation very much depends on one’s individual circumstances. Ohio is not “tax-friendly” for retirees, in the sense of being stingy with exemptions and exclusions. Thus an affluent retiree, who depends largely on investment-income, might find Ohio cost-of-living higher than in say Washington State, even if the latter’s real-estate prices are much higher.

For a lower-income retiree, the main advantage of the Dayton region is low real estate prices. For those who care for a more rural lifestyle, it is possible to live in the countryside and yet to be within easy access to retail, libraries and the like. Traffic is light, and streets are generally well-maintained. I’d not wish to retire here, because I don’t care for the prevailing Midwestern culture, and much prefer the smell of salt water. For others, these are nugatory and ridiculous considerations, and they may indeed have a lovely time in this region, provided that they’re careful about the specific town/locale for where to settle down.

One more thing about property tax. As a total annual dollar amount, it’s fairly reasonable, at least compared to taxes on the coasts. But as a percentage of house market value, it is fairly high – typically 2%-2.5% in the towns, maybe 1.5% in the unincorporated townships.
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Old 09-06-2017, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
504 posts, read 197,770 times
Reputation: 2121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWOH View Post
I wouldn't agree, and here is why:

Snapshot of property taxes by county tables

It's safe to figure about a 2.25% tax rate no matter where you go in the area
HA, nice try - not so!

I looked at that data, too; however, I think it is very misleading because it only shows county averages.

Sure, Montgomery County comes away looking not that bad on this table, but only because the property tax GOUGING that is occurring in the more affluent surrounding suburbs is offset by the comparatively extremely low property taxes being collected in Dayton and other poorer communities within the county. After all, when a house in Dayton is valued at less than $50K, how much property taxes do you think the County can collect on that?

I think the OP would be best served to first identify the specific communities that interest him, and then investigate the property taxes for those communities. Montgomery County has to get the money to prop up Dayton and its failed fiscal policies somewhere, and property owners in the south suburbs have deeper pockets.
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Old 09-06-2017, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Dayton OH
15 posts, read 12,057 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitality1 View Post
I visited Dayton area last year and saw a lot of closed business and boarded up homes. I visted west Dayton and trotwood was not impressed. I would like to hope Dayton is up and coming but since i will be retiring and I know a couple of people in Dayton I was thinking about moving to Dayton cause California is too expensive. I rode around Kettering and went to mall in beaver creek can anyone tell me about property tax and the good and bad for centerville Kettering Hubert heights englewood Clayton etc I want to be able to go to a grocery store a gym Doctor dentist Most of all I want to feel safe. I will be looking to purchase a house
You may want to check out Xenia. The taxes are low and it would have everything you need. The schools are so so but that shouldn't matter to you. Xenia has a wide variety of neighborhoods. Some parts are sketchy but for the most part it is safe . It is growing with several new developments going on. Its about 12 miles east of Dayton.

Fairborn is closer to Dayton and has similar taxes and neighborhoods.
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Old 09-07-2017, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
504 posts, read 197,770 times
Reputation: 2121
OP, perhaps familiarize yourself with the local Dayton newspaper if you haven't already checked it out? Montgomery County hospital ERs tops in Ohio on OD patients
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Old 09-08-2017, 06:15 PM
 
3,514 posts, read 3,780,583 times
Reputation: 1808
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHNot4Me View Post
HA, nice try - not so!

I looked at that data, too; however, I think it is very misleading because it only shows county averages.

Sure, Montgomery County comes away looking not that bad on this table, but only because the property tax GOUGING that is occurring in the more affluent surrounding suburbs is offset by the comparatively extremely low property taxes being collected in Dayton and other poorer communities within the county. After all, when a house in Dayton is valued at less than $50K, how much property taxes do you think the County can collect on that?

I think the OP would be best served to first identify the specific communities that interest him, and then investigate the property taxes for those communities. Montgomery County has to get the money to prop up Dayton and its failed fiscal policies somewhere, and property owners in the south suburbs have deeper pockets.
Property taxes are a flat tax. So the percentage is the same for every person in the municipality.

To be honest, there are some deals but for the most part it's wise to figure paying out 2.25%.
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