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Old 12-19-2018, 10:27 PM
 
11 posts, read 3,143 times
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Hi. I am seriously considering moving to Ohio. I have taken several long road trips and narrowed possible states to Ohio and Indiana. I would love your advice on nice, but affordable areas for a single 30's female with 3 dogs, smaller areas but not too far from jobs.

I would eventually like to open a small dog grooming and dog daycare shop in an area open to small businesses. I have messaged several members here and have written down all of their advice. I know I can likely start grooming from home with a permit from the county but it may be tricky as I will need to rent the first year. I can also start with pet sitting/grooming in the client's house. I work 3rd shift in Counseling and CNA so I hopefully will not have to drive into any "City" but will need to be close to a hospital or facility offering these types of jobs before opening business.

I currently live in Ocala, Florida and it have lived here 3 years and am ready for a more "normal" place to settle down even if it is cold or perceived as "boring." I was born in NW Pennsylvania and do like that I can easily visit a couple of times per year. I lived most of my life in Texas and just relate to the Midwest more than other areas.


Any advice or suggestions are greatly appreciated as well as precautions or heavily taxed counties. I would eventually need 2+ acres as I have mini horses and donkey. I liked some areas I explored: Troy, Tipp City, Preble County, London, and some further out suburbs of Columbus. I am not sure if counties surrounding Columbus are as inclined to Agricultural homes/businesses as counties outside Dayton seem to be or not as Columbus seems to be growing fast and very populated. I did notice many schools have the Livestock Pavilion or Fairgrounds close to town or beside the school.


Thank you very much for your time.
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Old 12-21-2018, 06:08 AM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,829 posts, read 3,935,908 times
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I would also add the outlying areas surrounding Springfield as being possibilities. There are more rural and exurban areas here, with Mercy Hospital in Springfield itself being a good choice for medical work. However, the areas are not growing, remaining rather stagnant or possibly declining. Parts of Springfield closer to Dayton (such as Enon) will be more likely to have newer development potentials but remain primarily open in space.

Tipp City would probably be too expensive for land purchases over 2 acres. It is a higher-end exurb that is developing into a more traditional suburb/bedroom community. The school district isn't big so most parcels command a higher than normal price, I would imagine.

Troy is also developing a quicker pace as the market has recovered and home inventories are tight, so new developments and builds are picking up there as well. Both Troy and Tipp have good to excellent schools, thus the increasing demand. Troy used to be its own town with a true small town center, but has over the last 15-25 years become another suburb of Dayton's north side.

If you focus on medical centers, Upper Valley Medical Center is in Troy I believe with other branches or centers to the north (i.e. Piqua). Kettering Medical has a newer facility in Englewood. Actual trauma level hospitals would be Grandview, just north of downtown Dayton or Miami Valley Hospital, just south of downtown. MVH is the biggest player in the region with the likeliest source for those types of jobs. Grandview is owned by Kettering Medical Network and is the second biggest player. Kettering's primary hospital is in, as you probably guessed, Kettering, a southern suburb of Dayton and is slightly isolated from the interstate, making commutes from northern, outlying areas a little tougher.

While you are correct that Columbus is growing fast and growing outward, there may be options to the northeast (past New Albany and its schools as it's quite expensive), east (Southwest Licking Schools / Pataskala come to mind) or southeast (Pickerington School's rural parts or Bloom Carol Schools for here). Most of these places don't have traditional suburban developments, with exceptions being the central, western and northern parts of Pickerington Schools and its city proper and western parts of Southwest Licking Schools (as this is closer to Columbus' sprawl). The rest will be townships in traditionally rural counties (Licking and Fairfield). You will have more traffic to most hospitals, including the ones near downtown (Ohio Health's Grant, Nationwide Children's and by close extension, OSU Medical). On the eastern side of town, there is a medical center in Canal Winchester and Mt Carmel East on E. Broad St. at I-270. I would concentrate on this side of Columbus if that is more your interest. You will also likely find a bigger business customer base in this part of the state. Newark likely has its own hospital but I don't know its name or reputation. Rural outliers of Lancaster, past the Bloom Carroll schools, may also be another option but that would be quite a haul up US33 to Columbus, especially places well inside the I-270 beltway.
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Old 12-21-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
551 posts, read 222,707 times
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Stay clear of Montgomery County (Dayton), the second highest taxed county out of 88 in the state.
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Old 12-29-2018, 06:07 AM
 
11 posts, read 3,143 times
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Thank you both very much for your advice and recommendations. Yes, it is quite strange sometimes how counties or areas you would never think are highly taxed end up being so. I really appreciate your help. I plan on visiting in a month or so and also looking seriously for a place to rent. Thanks!!!
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Old Yesterday, 03:33 PM
 
2 posts, read 28 times
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Default I second this

Quote:
Originally Posted by OHNot4Me View Post
Stay clear of Montgomery County (Dayton), the second highest taxed county out of 88 in the state.
Montgomery County is indeed the most corrupt county in Ohio
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Old Today, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
551 posts, read 222,707 times
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Just got my property tax bill.

$4300 for a 1972 SF 1970s 3 BR/2B brick ranch in an innner ring suburb.

Un-f'ing-believable.
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Old Today, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
551 posts, read 222,707 times
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Correction: 1956 SF
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Old Today, 04:50 PM
 
7,045 posts, read 4,587,029 times
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DogMom, your strategy sounds eminently reasonable, but there's one slight contradiction. If your dog-grooming business intends for customers to bring their pets to your house, you need to be in a more-affluent area, where customers don't have far to drive. That means higher property-costs, higher property taxes and less likelihood of acreage for your animals.

Best would then be a city where the suburbs rapidly end, and the countryside begins. An example of that in the Dayton area would be Beavercreek. An acquaintance of mine has a home-business focusing on cats, along the lines of what you propose for dogs. She lives on the east terminus of Beavercreek, in an area that's not a subdivision/plat, on an acre or two.

You can also find a larger house, perhaps with a smattering of wear, for a very reasonable price. That's perhaps the major appeal of the Dayton region. For $200K you can get a large-ish house, on multiple acres, in Beavercreek Township, or Sugarcreek Township. The tax-situation is however something worthy of careful attention. Jurisdictions vary substantially, in their property taxes and local income taxes. Often, the poorer jurisdictions have higher taxes - because their tax-base is lower, while funding-needs are no lower.
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Old Today, 05:33 PM
 
11 posts, read 3,143 times
Reputation: 17
Thank you very much for your help. Yes, there are many things to take into consideration. I completely understand being in an nice, newer, more upscale area. I have checked many states and with doggy daycare being a newer type of business completely understand all the different aspects to take into consideration. I likely will have to rent a business and also a place to live the first year. Zoning is also difficult in many states and on down to the county and part of town and many local government offices when you call them directly to get an answer, don't have much of an idea unless you pay huge monthly rental on a commercial type building in town or downtown or if more rural get a permit for running a business out of your home. Tennessee was the worst for not being able to give an answer and while it can be done, it seemed a very good ole boy system based on who you know or ("winging it") once you buy a home. A lot of people seem to do this under the table in Florida, Texas or many states or offer a few dogs in their home in addition to pet sitting. I am hoping to be above board and it is harder when moving out of state, this is why I don't mind if it takes a but more time looking and choosing a good, nice area. I hear mixed reviews on Ohio and Indiana. The mid Southern states have many nice areas, but it is still very hot and humid there. Many mid Atlantic states and even Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia have gotten very crowded and many areas have high crime, that is a lot of why I am looking more north, even if it is really cold. I also hope to stay permanently. I do worry about the taxes, especially being single. Thanks very much for the advice.
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Old Today, 07:02 PM
 
7,045 posts, read 4,587,029 times
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Some of your questions could perhaps be posed to a Chamber of Commerce type of organization, or perhaps to the State directly. They'd have information about zoning and the like.

The overall choice of where to relocate, is an endemically tough one. SW Ohio has a mild climate by Midwestern standards, but that's like an efficient muscle-car, or a small NFL player, or a domesticated wolf... the least-bad option. SW Ohio winters are on average slightly more severe than higher latitudes on the East Coast, but the "polar vortex" makes its occasional visit, for truly brutal cold. Worse, I think, is the high extremes and lack of transitional seasons. Winter and summer between them occupy most of the year. It's unusual to find intermediate weather, where it's sufficiently warm to wear a business-suit without an overcoat, and sufficiently cool to not be sweating in said business-suit. Alternatively, there are few months in the year, when neither heating or air conditioning are necessary for indoor spaces.

Summers are milder here than in the South, but the South has transitional seasons that are longer... and if winter itself is sufficiently mild, all of winter could be regarded as a transitional season.

Overcrowding is the least of our problems. I often slap my forehead in dismay, over political debates about immigration and the like. I can't speak for the nation, but locally we need more people, not less. We need more demand for housing and more taxpayers. Even if quality of life is OK, in terms of well-paved roads, clean parks, a good selection of restaurants and so forth, there's a pall over the place, a sense of stasis or outright decline. LA and SF may have more homeless people but there is a vibrancy to those places, a sense of progress and growth. Dayton's not quite as bad as the harrowing news-reports and stories of blight and decay... but it just doesn't have the dynamism, the affluence and the core of well-paying jobs that anchor the more affluent parts of the country.

There are plenty of places where it's harder to start a business, or to find a good quality of life. But there are also plenty of places where it's easier.
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