U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Delaware
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-07-2011, 08:26 AM
 
19,922 posts, read 9,996,119 times
Reputation: 27341

Advertisements

I'm starting this new thread with the hopes of promoting the sharing of ideas and information relative to saving money (for individuals and groups) in today's economy. Let me say from the outset that I don't want this to be a thread that veers off into political discussion. There are enough threads over at the "Politics and Other Controversies" section of City-Data. I'd like this to be a clean, helpful discussion of ways that we can cooperatively reduce expenses for ourselves, our households and where applicable our homeowner's associations. I think that the economy over the next several years will present financial challenges to us all, with the prospect of lowered pension and social security payments, price instability and more. A thread like this could potentially be helpful.

Here are examples of what I mean, some of which are or may be happening already:

[1] I know there are some communities that have developed community gardens where they work together and share the results. Are others considering it?

[2] Are there joint or bulk purchasing opportunities available? We know that buying by the case can be less expensive than buying by the piece. Are there any organized efforts to buy by the case and share the cost?

[3] Homeowner's associations have costs related to lawn maintenance as an example. Do any HOA's share information with each other about cost and quality? (Is that allowed? I would imagine this kind of information would not be proprietary and could be shared.) If community A is getting a better deal than community B, does that give community B a little leverage to get a better deal and lower the community's HOA costs for all? Could communities A and B work together to get a contract with the same lawn maintenance company and lower both costs?

[4] Have any community groups gone to food clubs (Costco or BJs or Sam's Club) and looked into community memberships, much like corporate accounts, where all residents of a community can shop as club members.

[5] I believe that one 55+ community, I think it's Nobles Pond, have become members of one of the Delaware credit unions, which enables all of their residents to become members. Have others considered this? By the way, as long as I'm sharing, for those 55 and over, if you join Modern Maturity in Dover, it allows you membership into the Dover Federal Credit Union.

It's these kinds of ideas that I'm hoping to see from those who participate here that can help us all get through what I think will be a challenging economic environment in years to come. Looking forward to reading your ideas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-07-2011, 10:41 PM
 
4,133 posts, read 13,329,118 times
Reputation: 3788
Very thought-provoking ideas, Charley, no real answers here but I like the idea of the community gardens for those w/ green thumbs (or potential!) and also community memberships at Costco etc in particular but imo buying by the case might be a bit challenging unless ppl pay in advance and would the savings be worth it - ? - guess it would depend on the product. I also like the idea of the lawn maintenance which prob. most communities have (incl. ours), that way everything is kept up if one is away or unable to mow etc, it's a big plus but as far as price, of course it would depend on the size lot which even in the same comm. would probably vary somewhat. Curious as to others' thoughts in the various communities...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 12:09 AM
 
96 posts, read 169,215 times
Reputation: 96
Lightbulb Thinking BIG

Charley, once again, you're a genius! What a good idea to put these questions out there! I noticed on another thread (perhaps it was your original "55...") some ideas for saving on things like TV, internet, etc. I hope those will be brought over here as well. Like you, I'm not down there yet but have had these same concerns, especially given that I'll be moving on my own, so funds will need to be stretched even further. And then, as you mentioned, there's the economy...

I do know that Nobles Pond opened their community garden this year. (I have black thumbs, but hoped I might learn from others when I get moved.) I also queried them about any restrictions on things like solar panels and tankless water heaters. (Why have the water heater run all the time for only me?) Perhaps, at some point, DE will offer healthy incentives to install solar like NJ does now. I was pleased to learn that NP does offer all as options. You just need to go through them so that, for example, the panel arrays all keep a uniform look in the community. I was unaware of the credit union arrangement (NPs or MMs). Nice. I'll see what else I can find out when I go down again.

I love the idea of joining with other communities aimed at negotiating better deals for things like lawn service once the HOAs are in place and bulk food buying which could be investigated at any time. I had given thought to this latter, but only in terms of within my community where there are several other singles. Expanding that reach should provide even greater leverege. Another potential savings opportunity could be in bundling pool maintenance contracts. On a roll here... let's keep it up!

And, again, Charley, thanks so much for bringing up the topic. You bring such value to this forum and we all appreciate it!
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 02:01 AM
 
7,373 posts, read 10,816,257 times
Reputation: 15007
From a local point of view - It does my heart good to see new people thinking about working together for the better of all. Although this thread is directed to those living in subdivisions, and/or those having homeowners associations, I'd like to point out that those thoughts outlined above are in existence and have been a Delaware way of life in many old fashioned towns, rural farming communities, and Amish communities. This lifestyle has sustained us, has strengthened good fellowship, and I'm of the belief that the cooperative lifestyle we've practiced so many years points to why Delaware citizens are so friendly and welcoming to newcomers. About those points outlined above, here's how we live:

1) Gardens - Having lived on a large farm, and now in a small town, garden and produce sharing has been going on for as long as I can remember. - 'Here are my squash from my garden, I'd love some of your tomatoes'. It's not at all unusual for people here to leave garden produce on one another's door step. Along many country roads in Kent County, an excess of home grown produce is advertised as FREE. If not, a large bag of tomatoes may cost you $1.00, and if you don't have it, whatever is in your pocket will be fine.

2) Bulk Purchases - Neighbors around my town tell one another if someone is going to Sam's Club on a specific day. And, if it's not mentioned, the question is asked when crossing paths at the post office, town hall, or town park - 'When's Jim's next trip to Sam's? We need a supply of paper towels'. The message is passed along (not by e-mail or phone, but by word of mouth) and the planned shopping list is put together.

3) Lawn Maintenance - We have 2 different lawn maintenance companies in our town. We patronize them because they live here, and we are reciprocated with lower prices. In regard to snow removal - It's never a problem. We simply help one another.

4) Joint Food Clubs - Covered in 2)

5) Delaware Credit Unions - Having a friend or relative in good standing in credit unions (the ones I know, at least) = membership. There are many credit unions around here. In our town, we are members of either Del-One (State Credit Union), Dover Federal Credit Union, State Police Federal Credit Union, or any of the others. And we know, in Delaware, we old-timers are either related to one another, are friends with someone in a credit union, or are friends/relative to a credit union employee. Everybody's a member of one credit union or another.

I've never really thought about the above points mentioned by the OP as being something new. But, it's nice to see newcomers thinking "cooperative" so that this Delaware way of life can be carried on and extended from rural farming communities and small towns to newer subdivisions and new people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 04:31 AM
 
19,922 posts, read 9,996,119 times
Reputation: 27341
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdlr View Post
Although this thread is directed to those living in subdivisions, and/or those having homeowners associations ...
I just wanted to add two thoughts:

This could just as easily apply to three or four people in the same neighborhood who aren't part of any other affiliation ... just friends and neighbors who want to economize together.

In the process of finding cost efficiencies, it would be nice to involve the local businesses in whatever ways possible. As the big box stores and chains push their way into neighborhoods, I agree with what has been said many times ... that small, local businesses are the backbone of our country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 06:17 AM
 
7,373 posts, read 10,816,257 times
Reputation: 15007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley View Post
I just wanted to add two thoughts:

This could just as easily apply to three or four people in the same neighborhood who aren't part of any other affiliation ... just friends and neighbors who want to economize together.

In the process of finding cost efficiencies, it would be nice to involve the local businesses in whatever ways possible. As the big box stores and chains push their way into neighborhoods, I agree with what has been said many times ... that small, local businesses are the backbone of our country.
Yes, a "cooperative" can apply anywhere, and it has been happening. This is an excellent thread, and may be an eye opener for some, because this is the way we've lived in Delaware for, at least, all the years of my life, and it's never been given a second thought. One difference though - we've never called how we live a "cooperative". It just makes good sense to help one another out, for the benefit of all.

And yes, local businesses are very involved. Take for instance our local butcher who donated a couple hundred hamburgers and hot dogs, and cases of water to Camp Hope, while another local business gives discounts to frequent shoppers. And then there's a local orchard who donated gallons of peach ice cream to a community event. I could go on and on about local businesses, how much they contribute, and how much they discount their goods if buying bulk. By the same token, I will not ignore the WalMarts in Kent County, who constantly support local groups, hospitals, and other needy facilities with non-perishable foods and money.

It's the Delaware way, just not talked about.
We call it "simple old fashioned living".

And, an afterthought.....this helping one another began way before our time when Delaware farmers took turns driving to town in their horse and buggys to shop for all the neighbors on their road......kind of like the Amish here still do today.

Last edited by rdlr; 08-08-2011 at 06:27 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,938,661 times
Reputation: 42862
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdlr View Post
It's the Delaware way, just not talked about.
We call it "simple old fashioned living".

And, an afterthought.....this helping one another began way before our time when Delaware farmers took turns driving to town in their horse and buggys to shop for all the neighbors on their road......kind of like the Amish here still do today.
Yet another reason I really like Delaware.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
1,144 posts, read 1,827,052 times
Reputation: 1339
You have some great ideas - I'm trying to move from Connecticut to Delaware but one item CT was trying to get passed especially in Condos is to remove the clothes line restriction - Allowing people to use one of those circular clothes lines units - I know its not the prettiest thing but for sure its a big money saver -For now I hang as much as I can in the bathroom leaving the dryer only for things that I have no other recourse -
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 07:35 PM
 
4,493 posts, read 4,754,903 times
Reputation: 9972
I'm not in the area but I think the whole idea is really great!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2011, 08:28 PM
 
4,133 posts, read 13,329,118 times
Reputation: 3788
I loved my outdoor clothesline too, the clothes smelled fresh (alth. once in a while got a bit buggy), sheets took just a few minutes to dry, clothes didnt shrink, I felt like I was doing my little part to help the environment etc (alth. I did use the dryer for towels and if i was in a rush to wear something) - but in our new place, they're not allowable outside so we're hanging clothes in a small rack in the bathroom (had been putting the rack in a corner of the garage but it was too darn humid, they dried much faster in the bathroom). I do missing hanging them outside, it was so automatic and fast and the way our yards were set up, they werent noticable so it was no problem but I can understand others may not be thrilled to see them and that's OK, I'll miss it but can go w/ the flow, change is good.
PS there's a thread about clotheslines here - Do you use a dryer, or hang your laundry out?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PJ1252 View Post
You have some great ideas - I'm trying to move from Connecticut to Delaware but one item CT was trying to get passed especially in Condos is to remove the clothes line restriction - Allowing people to use one of those circular clothes lines units - I know its not the prettiest thing but for sure its a big money saver -For now I hang as much as I can in the bathroom leaving the dryer only for things that I have no other recourse -
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Delaware
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:48 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top