U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Delaware
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Unread 08-14-2013, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
3,308 posts, read 1,747,819 times
Reputation: 2882
Default Coyotes in Delaware??

A recent news story on WGND FM tells us the coyotes have been spotted in Rehoboth and Sussex County Council wants open season on them, http://wp.wgmd.com/coyote_resolution_FINAL.08-13-13.pdf
Any one SEEN a coyote?
http://wgmd.com/common/more.php?m=49...&post_id=55231
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 08-14-2013, 03:15 AM
 
195 posts, read 121,492 times
Reputation: 148
A friend saw one while night fishing at Beach Plum Island last fall. It stood on the crest of the dune watching him.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-14-2013, 04:25 AM
 
4,334 posts, read 5,031,761 times
Reputation: 6293
Yes, I've seen a few over the years. Recently, 2 near Hartly, and another 1 near Sandtown.

http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/hun...s/coyotes.aspx
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-14-2013, 02:10 PM
Status: "Spring--is that you knocking on my back door?" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Ocean View, DE
1,192 posts, read 1,066,688 times
Reputation: 416
I've seen them quite often in Ocean View....at least a handful of sightings in the past couple years including one which had taken up a habit of howling nightly in my backyard last fall. We are not hunters here (although we have nothing against hunters and I come from a very long line of them), but I don't see a problem with hunting them if they become a nuisance or become aggressive. As stated, we don't hunt but we have guns and would not hesitate to shoot anything that posed a threat. However, if they aren't a problem...then as the song says, "Let It Be".

I am outside quite often, and I'm in the deep woods every week during the fall and winter. I've seen them there along with many fox. I've even observed a scroungy looking "coyote" running around my development. It was really creepy...at least I think it was a coyote. Never seen anything look or act so strange.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-14-2013, 02:46 PM
Status: "...did you ever realize what you'd become..." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: In the land of cotton
3,239 posts, read 1,386,593 times
Reputation: 6902
One of the first things that will happen when coyotes move into an area is all the pet cats allowed to roam outside at night will disappear. Our neighborhood had coyotes "move-in" and all my neighbors' cats disappeared. One of the neighbors found a furry blood spot on his driveway - the fur matched his pet cat.

The rabbits will also disappear.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-15-2013, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,443 posts, read 5,429,418 times
Reputation: 2113
I believe coyotes have now established populations in all of the lower 48. They are highly adaptable, omnivorous, consume small prey such as lizards, rodents and even insects, and have been able to adapt to suburban and urban environments. Hardly surprising if they range throughout much of Delaware.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-15-2013, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
2,622 posts, read 931,544 times
Reputation: 4065
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
I believe coyotes have now established populations in all of the lower 48. They are highly adaptable, omnivorous, consume small prey such as lizards, rodents and even insects, and have been able to adapt to suburban and urban environments. Hardly surprising if they range throughout much of Delaware.
I believe you are correct about them being in all the contiguous states. They have become a nuisance in Upstate New York where we have an open season on them.

They had been seen in several of the suburbs of Buffalo, NY. It's common to hear them howling and yipping at night in many urban/suburban areas. IMO, it's just a matter of time before they become as common as whitetail deer in urban/suburban settings with the same issues of how to control their populatiions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-15-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Alaska
972 posts, read 486,725 times
Reputation: 1288
I concur with beachliz, as long as they are not posing a threat to humans or our animals, I see it as a good thing for our ecology and the environment. The fact is they help to keep the vermin population at a manageable level, so fewer vermin encroach into populated areas looking for food and spreading diseases.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-16-2013, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,443 posts, read 5,429,418 times
Reputation: 2113
My understanding is that the coyote population in DE is not very physically healthy as a whole, with many animals infected with various diseases. There's no perfect solution ecologically: my neighborhood is infested with rabbits and groundhogs, and we have less visible deer coming into our yards probably every night (if it snows, you always see their tracks, and they are the only thing tall enough to have eaten off 90% of the unopened blossoms on our daylillies for the past two years). I often wish we had more foxes in the neighborhood -- I see them occasionally, but their numbers don't seem adequate to keep down the rabbits and groundhogs. However, foxes too may carry diseases, most seriously rabies. That's likewise a worry with coyotes (though bad cases of mange seem to be the more common thing).

I'm not sure what the solution is, frankly. I'm not in favour of wanton shooting of the creatures, or indiscriminately poisoning them. However, nuisance animals and the overall population do need to be kept under control. I believe various ways of delivering contraceptive agents have been tried some places.

It would seem likely that it's only a matter of time until black bears show up in Delaware, although I would think populations in MD and PA would have to increase first. Their are large numbers in NJ, but they would have to infiltrate through the former two States to get into DE.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 08-16-2013, 06:31 AM
 
4,334 posts, read 5,031,761 times
Reputation: 6293
Keep in mind, that Delaware is an agricultural state. Critters -sick and/or healthy are in abundance. Corn, soy beans, wheat, barley, sorghum, crab apples and even flowers, are their foods. Trips to western Kent & Sussex counties would be very educational for those wondering about critters here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Delaware

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top