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Old 05-13-2009, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Stirling, NJ (Southern Morris County)
199 posts, read 313,498 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
I'm guessing your relatives may live in the Upper Midwest, with more Scandanavian influence in the speech? I'm thinking more Kansas or Nebraska. The DE accent seems to me utterly lacking in extremity. I could understand that there may be a subtle continuation with the accents of the Coastal Upper South, though I don't personally detect much. There isn't any of the Jersey, Philly, Greater NYC or New England sound to native DE accents. I occasionally hear relatively more Southern accents here (like amongst restaurant clientele or something) but assume those persons aren't natives.

A discussion of the DE accent would be more interesting than the unresolvable argument over whether DE is in the North or the South!
They're from the Chicago area. I agree, there isn't anything Northeastern in the Delaware accent, which is why I think it, along with the rest of Delmarva, has an accent of its own. I've always thought it was a mix between a Philly and southern accent. I've never thought it sounded Midwestern, though.

 
Old 05-13-2009, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Stirling, NJ (Southern Morris County)
199 posts, read 313,498 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
Have you ever been to South Jersey? That's where my parents grew up and then they moved to Delaware. Their accent is pretty much the same as the one I knew in Lower Delaware.
Yes, I have. South Jersey is basically a Philly accent. I think there's a difference between it and the Delaware/Eastern Shore accent, however there might be a similarity or two (like the long "o').
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
Well, Jersey has a couple of accent patterns, doesn't it? There's one very Northern type accent that I think is identified by outsiders as typically New Jersey. To the extent that working class Philly influence has infiltrated South Jersey, I expect there's that peculiar Philly accent there, and I would identify the Philly accent as being of the Northern variety. I know some people from South Jersey who sound like they could be from Philly and some people who grew up in South Jersey and sound just like DE (all foks who live here now).
Yes, New Jersey's accents are very much defined by NYC in the north and Philly in the south. There is no "New Jersey accent". The North Jersey accent is very similar to NYC, and South Jersey is pretty much a Philly accent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
That's almost always the argument to say that a state is "Southern."

The only state that doesn't have any (or very few) rural areas is New Jersey.
That's incorrect, and a common misconception of New Jersey. New Jersey has plenty of rural areas. In fact, the majority of the southern half of the state, other than the areas immediately surrounding Philadelphia, are rural. Ever hear of the Pinelands? Also, northwestern NJ is rural (Sussex, Warren, Hunterdon, and parts of Morris and Somerset counties). But this isn't about NJ, so I'll try to stay on topic.
Quote:
The majority (in terms of land area) of nearly every other state is rural, and enjoys a "slower pace of life." 90% of Pennsylvania is rural, and so is all of upstate NY minus Rochester, Syracuse, Buffalo, and Albany. There are even parts of Long Island that are rural. My mom is from Hartford, Connecticut, and my dad (who is from NYC) lived there a while too, and they always used to say that there were lots of rural areas with small winding roads. In fact, when my mom was at Brown she said that there was the 2 lane country road that she would usually take when she drove to Providence from CT. What really shocked me though is when she said that CT had numerous tobacco farms, which I didn't even know existed north of Richmond (i.e. Tobacco Central).
Yup, there are rural areas of every state. Some more than others. My point was that all of Southern Delaware (minus the beaches) is rural, thus sharing something with the South in the classical sense. You're correct though, most of PA and NY are extremely rural.
Quote:
Every state on the East Coast has had slaves at one point. New York, for instance was a slave state for nearly 200 years. Just recently they found this huge slave burial ground right in Lower Manhattan. Newport, RI used to be a huge slave trading port. I do understand that slave state is usually meant to describe a Southern state, which had large numbers of slaves up to the Civil War, and whose economy was dependent on them (i.e. the Confederacy). But, apart from DE (and MD, DC, and WV) not seceding to the Confederacy, DE had virtually abandoned slavery by the time of the Civil War, with only a handful of slaves remaining in the state, and most of the African-Americans in Maryland were free. Also, the Emancipation Proclamation didn't cover either state, instead the two states freed slaves on their own accord. However, in NJ (which posessed 2/3 of Northern slaves) many slaves became "indentured servants for life."

btw There used to be a baseball team in Easton, MD (located west of Kent County, DE) called the "Yankees."

This post isn't really directed at NJPhilly, I'm just pointing something out, and giving a brief history lesson .
Yes, pretty much every state has had slavery at one time or another. But the big difference, like you said, is when those slaves were freed. They might have had slaves in northern states in the 1700's, but those were largely freed well before the Civil War. The southern states, however, and Maryland and Delaware still had slaves at the beginning of the Civil War. It's not a put-down of Delaware, but it is something that does link it historically with the South. I did, however, note that I wouldn't consider Delaware southern.

 
Old 11-27-2010, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,372 posts, read 1,231,278 times
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From what i can tell, the north is totally Northeastern, and the south is kinda sorta southern.
 
Old 11-27-2010, 11:11 PM
 
63 posts, read 17,840 times
Reputation: 43
Delaware is in the same boat as Maryland
 
Old 11-28-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,619 posts, read 6,176,378 times
Reputation: 2335
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
From what i can tell, the north is totally Northeastern, and the south is kinda sorta southern.
A good description IMO. However, are we going to revive this AGAIN?!?
 
Old 11-29-2010, 08:20 PM
 
1,032 posts, read 1,961,189 times
Reputation: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJphillyfan View Post
They're from the Chicago area. I agree, there isn't anything Northeastern in the Delaware accent, which is why I think it, along with the rest of Delmarva, has an accent of its own. I've always thought it was a mix between a Philly and southern accent. I've never thought it sounded Midwestern, though.
Wilmington ( the town, that is,) has an accent more similar to the Philadelphia area than the rest of the peninsula.

The problem is, is that native Wilmingtonians have their cliques, and they don't quite let outsiders into their cliques. There is a huge difference between the city of Wilmington and the rest of the state.

I looked around, and I can only find a few actual Wilmington accents - which are rare due to the fact that Wilmington is small, and most of the native european Wilmingtons have moved up and moved out.

For your reference, these are examples of Wilmington accents:




(skip to 2:50)


Last edited by Joe84323; 11-29-2010 at 08:55 PM..
 
Old 11-29-2010, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,619 posts, read 6,176,378 times
Reputation: 2335
Most of the local natives I know around here grew up in the Brandywine Hundred ("north Wilmington" and hence not the City of Wilmington per se) and they have a very neutral American accent that is quite unlike the more pronounced and stereotypical Philly and eastern PA accents. Most of my Brandywine Hundred native friends are a couple generations removed from their immigrant forebears, most of whom were Italian or Irish. However, IME the native DE accent amongst Boomers thru Gen-Xers (including young people on the cusp of Gen-Y) is a very unremarkable standard American accent, much like the lower Midwest tv newscaster speech). I detect little bits of Southern speech patterns in a few people, esp if they are older boomers, but it is very subtle and difficult for me to absolutely put my finger on.
 
Old 11-29-2010, 08:45 PM
 
1,032 posts, read 1,961,189 times
Reputation: 894
Jef, you would consider the above examples "neutral?" Because those are the traditional Greater Wilmington accent.

I couldn't imagine a news anchor talking like the above people - but maybe that's my ears.
 
Old 11-29-2010, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
470 posts, read 377,984 times
Reputation: 379
Delaware and Maryland are in the middle
 
Old 11-30-2010, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,619 posts, read 6,176,378 times
Reputation: 2335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe84323 View Post
Jef, you would consider the above examples "neutral?" Because those are the traditional Greater Wilmington accent.

I couldn't imagine a news anchor talking like the above people - but maybe that's my ears.
No, Joe, the people who grew up in the North Wilmington burbs don't have those Philly type notes in their speech, at least that I can detect. Of your examples, the first - white female talking about a murder - has to my ears the most typical PA sort of accent, while the other examples vary. The white guy on the city services video has rather neutral generic northeastern speech (IMO) while the female African American presenter on the same vid has relatively subtle Philly type speech notes (these characteristics seem to sort of come and go in her speech). I don't find that most younger native Delawareans sound like those examples. The people I know who are exceptions weren't born here at all but grew up in working class or lower middle class homes in eastern/northeastern PA or in NJ and are mostly relatively older, born before the end of WWII (hence not boomers but not really part of "the greatest generation" either -- what do you call that age group who were too young to fight in WWII or Korea but who aren't boomers because born before WWII ended?).
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