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Old 05-15-2011, 09:06 PM
 
2,606 posts, read 6,120,241 times
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Okay, so I had a root canal completed on a upper rear molar and then a few weeks later had the Post and Core put in.

I have NOT yet made an appointment to do the temporary crown and fitting for permanent crown. So I'm assuming I just have a filling over the post and core?

The dentist said I could wait up to 6 months to get the Crown made and a temp put on. But I'm maxed out on my insurance till January. Do you think I can wait that long? Is the risk only in breaking the tooth? (I have not been chewing on that side at all since the root canal as my dentist advised.)

OR if I wait until January is there a risk of damaging the root canal and needing it redone?? Because i DONT want that to happen.

Any advice would be great.
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:44 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle, originally from SF Bay Area
14,874 posts, read 18,293,404 times
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You should really be asking the dentist, not people here, but I'll go ahead and give my opinion since I have had several root canals and go in Tuesday for the second-to-last appointment for an implant that's taken
close to a year. Luckily both my wife and I have fully paid dental so we have double the maximums.

Your out-of-pocket for that crown is probably $700 if you are maxed out.
If you are very lucky, the remaining tooth will not get broken or decayed
while you wait for the next insurance year to come. If you are not lucky,
you could end up having it pulled and either live with a space there or get an implant. With double insurance and careful timing this one is costing me about $500, if I only had one insurance it would have been well over $1,000 out of pocket.
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Old 05-15-2011, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
1,961 posts, read 2,345,443 times
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Do you need a Crown? I had a Root Canal done 3 months ago and I never got a crown. My dentist said that I didn't need one.
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Old 05-16-2011, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,214,285 times
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If you need a crown, you need to get a temporary crown asap.
If you don't need a crown, then you don't need a crown.

It depends on the structural integrity of the tooth.
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Old 05-16-2011, 07:44 AM
 
2,606 posts, read 6,120,241 times
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I will need a crown because there is a small crack in the tooth, that is why I needed a root canal, the crack ended up causing my root to die. However, the dentist said the crack was in a good place...whatever that means.

Okay, well I will try and save the money faster then and hopefully get it done by Sept.
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Old 05-16-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Greenwood Village, Colorado
2,185 posts, read 1,764,309 times
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I know someone who went around like that for a couple years, it was when they changed dentists and went in for a tooth cleaning the dentist noticed he needed a crown.
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Old 05-17-2011, 09:30 PM
 
420 posts, read 1,402,672 times
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I'm a dentist so I'll chime in here. Not every root canal treated tooth needs a crown afterwards, it just depends on how much tooth structure is left. Most root canal treated teeth usually get a crown because they were so badly broken down to begin with that the only way to really stregthen the crown portion of the tooth is to get a crown. Now, understand a few things here. You still have to get a permanent filling in the tooth before any dentist starts the crown. We call that a "core buildup." It could be a white composite filling or an amalgam, doesn't matter really, just as long as there's something more permanent in there than a temporary filling. To me that's more important, because having patients walk around with a temp filling isn't all that great, at least put a permanent filling on it so the patient can chew and have it fill like a fully restored tooth.
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Old 08-19-2013, 03:50 PM
 
1 posts, read 7,921 times
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I had 2 temporary crowns put on since my insurance wont cover the other crowns that broke, now the temp crown has broken 2 times since its been put on. The temp crowns have cost 300 dollars each and the permanent crown will cost 1500 each. Will it be bad if I just wait for another year and get the permanent ones put back on? That is when my insurance will cover half of the crown costs. Its only been a couple of weeks and the temp crowns keep breaking. I cant afford to keep replacing the temps and I for sure can't afford the permanent ones.
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Old 06-11-2014, 05:28 PM
 
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I had decay under a filling. Dentist removed and put in core build up with temporary filling. Waiting for insurance to okay crown. If they don't how long can I wait to have crown? I would need to save up.
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Old 06-18-2014, 04:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraJB View Post
I had decay under a filling. Dentist removed and put in core build up with temporary filling. Waiting for insurance to okay crown. If they don't how long can I wait to have crown? I would need to save up.
Hi Laura,

I have been in the dental field for 12 years and worked at my current office for 9 so I'll give you my professional opinion. If you've been placed on a temporary filling then you should get the crown placed sooner rather than later. A temporary filling doesn't do much to keep bacteria or anything else from getting in this tooth. If your insurance doesn't pre-authorize the crown that you need done, you can either try to appeal it or just pay for the crown yourself. You may be able to work out something with your office, such as paying half of the crown the day you prepare the tooth and half of it when they place it in your mouth approximately two weeks later. Your dentist may also take Care Credit, which has no-interest payment plans.

Don't let cost get in the way of having a healthy smile! Where there is a will, there is a way.

- Sarah
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