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Old 09-30-2011, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Ohio
10 posts, read 70,036 times
Reputation: 19

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Some people go for the rest of their life after having a tooth pulled with no problems. I think implants are great but my oral surgeon charges $1650 for just the implant itself, no idea how much the crown would be. He's a good guy but I can't afford it at the moment. One day I will get them.
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Old 01-22-2014, 03:49 PM
 
356 posts, read 1,009,618 times
Reputation: 214
Ihave been researching the same thing. i have talked to 2 people who have had that last molar removed and both said it was fine.. it has been about a year for both of them.. i cant say what long term effects are
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Old 02-08-2014, 12:15 AM
 
495 posts, read 2,092,803 times
Reputation: 187
The tooth above the space tends to supererupt (i.e. drift downwards) especially if it is not occluding with any teeth on the bottom and the teeth on either side of the space, in particular the 2nd molar (the tooth behind the 1st molar you are considering extracting) will tend to tip forward by about 45 degrees. This can take a couple of years but I see it all the time. If any of these things happen, it could affect your ability to put a tooth in that gap down the road because the space you originally had there is now much smaller. The good news is you'll still be able to live a normal life!
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Old 02-09-2014, 01:44 PM
 
356 posts, read 1,009,618 times
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I was told by several people now it is not a matter of if something bad will happen but that it will happen. That if you pull a tooth and leave a space, in 10 or so years you WILL have a problem.
I wish someone could tell me different because I am dying to pull these 2 teeth! I cant stand having fake teeth in my mouth
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Old 02-24-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 2,958,784 times
Reputation: 1217
Quote:
Originally Posted by belladee View Post
I was told by several people now it is not a matter of if something bad will happen but that it will happen. That if you pull a tooth and leave a space, in 10 or so years you WILL have a problem.
I wish someone could tell me different because I am dying to pull these 2 teeth! I cant stand having fake teeth in my mouth
What ever happened to the old fashioned bridges??? I remember my mother having one for her molars and she would take them out amd soak them at night. Now what they call bridges are a hybrid of crown, grinding two teeth, in order to fill one gap with a false tooth in between. Crowns don't work for me after 3 to 5 years they get infected and stay infected. Can't see myself spending $1000s on something that will have to be removed in 3 to 5 yrs.

I'm looking for a dentist who still does these...like a needle in the dentist haystack
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Old 02-24-2014, 07:47 PM
 
428 posts, read 380,569 times
Reputation: 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redline View Post
The tooth above the space tends to supererupt (i.e. drift downwards) especially if it is not occluding with any teeth on the bottom and the teeth on either side of the space, in particular the 2nd molar (the tooth behind the 1st molar you are considering extracting) will tend to tip forward by about 45 degrees. This can take a couple of years but I see it all the time. If any of these things happen, it could affect your ability to put a tooth in that gap down the road because the space you originally had there is now much smaller. The good news is you'll still be able to live a normal life!
Why would a tooth supererupt because of a missing tooth? It doesn't seem like we spend all that much time biting down with our teeth.
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Old 02-25-2014, 04:41 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,613,675 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyewrist View Post
What ever happened to the old fashioned bridges??? I remember my mother having one for her molars and she would take them out amd soak them at night. Now what they call bridges are a hybrid of crown, grinding two teeth, in order to fill one gap with a false tooth in between. Crowns don't work for me after 3 to 5 years they get infected and stay infected. Can't see myself spending $1000s on something that will have to be removed in 3 to 5 yrs.

I'm looking for a dentist who still does these...like a needle in the dentist haystack
You're looking for a temporary bridge, the type that looks sort of like a retainer (braces), with a metal hook that "clips" onto the side teeth and a false tooth to fill in the gap where the tooth/teeth is/are missing, all attached to a flesh-colored plate?

It's called a temporary bridge

You can get them. But it's unsightly, you have to take out daily to clean, risk chipping your good teeth taking it in and out every day, and it has to be remade every time your teeth shift because it is designed to fit teeth in an exact certain position and even a fraction of a millimeter makes a difference in fit.

Or, you can get something that stays in there semi-permanently, looks exactly like real teeth, has no metal hooks that provide a constant risk of damage to the teeth they're hooked to, doesn't need to be soaked, and - here's the best part - if you go to a good dentist, and have good dental hygiene, and take whatever extra precautions are needed if dental problems run in the family - can last for WELL over a decade and in fact - some people have them life-long without a moment's trouble.

OR -

You can get an implant, and not have to worry about crowns, or side teeth being ground down, or taking things out to be cleaned every night. A single implant these days, isn't much more expensive than a permanent bridge, and provides less risk to adjacent teeth than any bridge (bridges by definition have to anchor to side teeth, whether by metal hooks or by grinding them down and covering them with crowns).

If your crowns are getting infected every 3-5 years, then there's something wrong with either your mouth, or the dentist, or your dental hygiene/lifestyle habits (or a combination of any of the three). Crowns in an otherwise healthy person placed by a responsible dentist and cared for properly should last at least ten years, and can last a lifetime.
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 2,958,784 times
Reputation: 1217
Thanks AC. The information was valuable. I will seek out a good ole dentist with the personal knowledge, pro and cons of all of these. Not looking for a dentist wanting to pay off his/her college loans , with a new home loan and new car to pay for
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Old 02-26-2014, 02:09 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,613,675 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyewrist View Post
Thanks AC. The information was valuable. I will seek out a good ole dentist with the personal knowledge, pro and cons of all of these. Not looking for a dentist wanting to pay off his/her college loans , with a new home loan and new car to pay for
Think of it this way:

You get a temporary bridge. It costs $500, from getting the impressions made, to sending it to the lab (prosthetics artist) to make it, to returning to get it fitted, and any adjustments needed (including the possibility that you might have to have it sent back to be re-made, if the lab made a mistake, which does occasionally happen).

Five years later, you chip one of the teeth that you clipped the bridge to, because - metal clip = risk of chipping teeth.

So now, you have to have that tooth crowned, which means the bridge no longer fits, and in fact, can no longer -be- made to fit that crowned tooth. So you just paid another $1000 to have a crown put on a tooth, plus you're now toothless again, and are probably going to need an implant. That's another $3000, assuming that you don't need bone grafting. Since you haven't had a tooth in that location for the past 5 years, it's possible that you will need bone grafting. So let's add another $1000. Now - total cost for a temporary bridge isn't really $500. It's $500 plus $1000 plus $3000 plus $1000. So that's a total of $5500, for an unsightly device that you have to take care of every day for the rest of your life, assuming nothing ELSE goes wrong with it or the remaining tooth that it's attached to.

Or - you could get a permanent bridge, which will be around $5000, including the grinding down, the impressions, the bridge including crowns over the ground-down anchors, etc. etc.

If you have it done right, it's possible that you will -never- have any problems with this bridge. But let's just say for the sake of argument, that you end up with a bad anchor tooth within the first five years. It happens, and has nothing to do with the bridge. Maybe you got a popcorn kernel stuck down in the gum and it festered and you had a cavity that wasn't noticeable because of the crown. It happens. If you're *lucky* the endodontist will be able to drill right through the crown to do the root canal. Chances are though, you'll need to have the crown removed. But the crown is part of the bridge. It's not an individual thing. It's all one "device" - crown, false tooth, crown, all connected with metal and porcelain. So you'll need the bridge removed, and the root canal done, and a new bridge put on, with new impressions.

That's going to be $5000 for the bridge, another $500 for the root canal including removal of the previously placed bridge, plus another $5000 to make a new bridge. That's $10500.

OR

You can get an implant. That's going to put you out around $3000, and take up to a year. Add another $1000 for grafting, which you might or might not need, but let's just pretend you do. If it's done correctly, and you floss daily, you'll have no need to replace it, or have any work done on it, for a minimum of 10 years, if not a lifetime. It has no effect on the adjacent teeth.

That will set you back $4000 total.

Summary:

Total expected average 5-year cost for cheapo removeable metal-clip bridge that looks like crap and can get lost, or end up in the soup bowl at the fancy restaurant if you chip a tooth and it falls out: $5500

Total expected average 5-year cost for decent permanent bridge, including the expected risk of needing work on one of the teeth the bridge is attached to: $10,500

Total expected average 5-year cost for implant, which can take a year to complete: $4000



So - which one is cheaper up front? The temp bridge. Which one's the most cost-efficient? The implant. Which one's going to provide the sports version of your dentist's new Beemer? The permanent bridge.
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Old 02-27-2014, 11:30 AM
 
356 posts, read 1,009,618 times
Reputation: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by notyouraveragebear View Post
Why would a tooth supererupt because of a missing tooth? It doesn't seem like we spend all that much time biting down with our teeth.
that makes good sense. maybe ill just push on the above tooth once in a while to keep it in place..lol
ill check back here in 10 years and let everyone know how its going because the crown that i have gives me total anxiety so an implant might put me over the edge
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