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Old 01-29-2012, 02:42 AM
 
3,453 posts, read 1,113,737 times
Reputation: 2556
Default Cost puts dental care out of reach

Cost puts dental care out of reach - UPI.com

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 28 (UPI) -- Dental expenses were among the highest out-of-pocket health expenditures for U.S. consumers in 2008, researchers say.

Study author Paul Glassman, a dentist and director of the Pacific Center for Special Care at University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, said the Bureau of Labor Statistics found out-of-pocket dental expenses cost consumers $30.7 billion -- 22.2 percent of total out-of-pocket health expenditures.

The study found 37 percent of African-American children, 41 percent of Hispanic children and 25 percent of white children have untreated tooth decay.
Moderator cut: article shortened, copyright protection

Last edited by Yac; 04-20-2012 at 01:49 AM..
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Old 01-29-2012, 09:14 AM
 
1,739 posts, read 1,602,567 times
Reputation: 1975
I can beleive it. We've got great insurance, a health benefit savings plan and make good money - and still had to budget for some needed dental work (implants and deep cleanings)
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Old 01-29-2012, 12:53 PM
 
3,453 posts, read 1,113,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakeneko View Post
I can beleive it. We've got great insurance, a health benefit savings plan and make good money - and still had to budget for some needed dental work (implants and deep cleanings)
I'm on disability, and so have no way at all to get dental work done.
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Old 01-29-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Laurel, Maryland
835 posts, read 1,987,901 times
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For years I couldn't afford dental work. I only went when the pain of an extremely bad tooth forced me to. I recently started a new job and the dental pays 100% for most procedures and 80% for the more complicated ones. My company also fully funds a Health Reimbursement Account at $1,000 a year. Unfortunately, this has come too late and I've had 9 extractions already (and a few root canals over the past several years). I am currently getting lots of work done on my remaining teeth (fillings and root canals). I will have to get partial dentures eventually. All this due to the cost of dental work!
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Old 01-29-2012, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
8,992 posts, read 8,197,917 times
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Folks, tooth decay is preventable.

Brush twice a day. Toothbrushes and toothpaste (with fluoride) are cheap.

Floss once a day. Floss is also cheap. It reaches where your toothbrush cannot.

Drink fluoridated water.

Do not smoke.

Do not use illegal drugs.

Do not put your baby to bed with a bottle of juice or milk.

Ask your dentist about fluoride treatments and sealants for your children's teeth.

Smoking and Dental Health: Yellow Teeth, Bad Breath, and Other Smoking Effects

HealthyChildren.org - Preventing Tooth Decay in Children

Tooth Decay - American Dental Association - ADA.org

Teeth and drug use | Better Health Channel

If everyone would do these things, dentists would start going out of business. Your dental costs will be less than the premium for dental insurance.

Taking care of your teeth may save money in the long run, since gum disease is associated with other chronic diseases:

Oral health: A window to your overall health - MayoClinic.com

Looking at the Periodontal-Systemic Disease Connection

For those who already have problems, there are companies that will let you charge the procedure and pay for it over time. Ask your dentist.
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Old 01-29-2012, 05:56 PM
 
Location: California
2,696 posts, read 1,795,974 times
Reputation: 4701
Seniors also need dental care, not just kids. Dental work doesn't last a lifetime so when fillings or caps need to be replaced, it is too expensive for people not only on disability, but also social security. I'll bet the lastest batch of candidates wouldn't tolerate their own dental pain for long but they don't care about others.

Sadly, there are some dentists who take advantage of seniors and charge them high prices for unnecessary work.
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Old 01-29-2012, 06:02 PM
 
3,453 posts, read 1,113,737 times
Reputation: 2556
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Folks, tooth decay is preventable.

Brush twice a day. Toothbrushes and toothpaste (with fluoride) are cheap.

Floss once a day. Floss is also cheap. It reaches where your toothbrush cannot.

Drink fluoridated water.

Do not smoke.

Do not use illegal drugs.

Do not put your baby to bed with a bottle of juice or milk.

Ask your dentist about fluoride treatments and sealants for your children's teeth.

Smoking and Dental Health: Yellow Teeth, Bad Breath, and Other Smoking Effects

HealthyChildren.org - Preventing Tooth Decay in Children

Tooth Decay - American Dental Association - ADA.org

Teeth and drug use | Better Health Channel

If everyone would do these things, dentists would start going out of business. Your dental costs will be less than the premium for dental insurance.

Taking care of your teeth may save money in the long run, since gum disease is associated with other chronic diseases:

Oral health: A window to your overall health - MayoClinic.com

Looking at the Periodontal-Systemic Disease Connection

For those who already have problems, there are companies that will let you charge the procedure and pay for it over time. Ask your dentist.
That's all well and good advice but the fact is that many people like me have a genetic predisposition to bad teeth. Dentists are not going out of business anytime soon, I'm afraid.
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Old 01-29-2012, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
8,992 posts, read 8,197,917 times
Reputation: 8863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post
Seniors also need dental care, not just kids. Dental work doesn't last a lifetime so when fillings or caps need to be replaced, it is too expensive for people not only on disability, but also social security. I'll bet the lastest batch of candidates wouldn't tolerate their own dental pain for long but they don't care about others.

Sadly, there are some dentists who take advantage of seniors and charge them high prices for unnecessary work.
There are good, competent, ethical dentists out there. If you need something expensive, get a second opinion. Make sure you understand what you are having done, why it is felt to be necessary, and how much it will cost.

If you anticipate having problems, then consider paying for dental insurance. There may be a waiting period, but in the long run you may come out ahead.

It would help if the people behind Medicare would take into consideration the other health benefits from having access to dental care. However, it will have to be paid for, and premiums would need to go up.
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Old 01-29-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
8,992 posts, read 8,197,917 times
Reputation: 8863
Quote:
Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
That's all well and good advice but the fact is that many people like me have a genetic predisposition to bad teeth. Dentists are not going out of business anytime soon, I'm afraid.
If you have a genetic predisposition to problems that does not mean that it is not worthwhile to do the things I mentioned. In fact, it is even more important. Your children and grandchildren should realize that, too.

It means you really have to pay attention to hygiene, it is imperative that you not smoke, and you should discuss with your dentist whether there is anything else you need to do, such as using an antibacterial mouthwash.

Antibiotics/antimicrobials for gum disease
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Old 01-29-2012, 07:18 PM
 
3,453 posts, read 1,113,737 times
Reputation: 2556
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
If you have a genetic predisposition to problems that does not mean that it is not worthwhile to do the things I mentioned. In fact, it is even more important. Your children and grandchildren should realize that, too.

It means you really have to pay attention to hygiene, it is imperative that you not smoke, and you should discuss with your dentist whether there is anything else you need to do, such as using an antibacterial mouthwash.

Antibiotics/antimicrobials for gum disease
I am aware of these things, and wasn't suggesting that it isn't worthwhile to do them. My point is that even good dental hygiene cannot trump genetics. And I have discussed these things with my dentist when I was able to afford one. But I'm like the millions of people in this country who cannot afford yet need dental work.
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