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Old 04-29-2017, 12:25 PM
 
3,740 posts, read 1,800,999 times
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Had my wisdoms pulled years ago. 38 now. Tooth in question is right side top, farthest in the back.

It's been partially broken for years. Saw an ex ray like 8 years ago and they pointed out how it was grayish on the ex ray. Doesn't really hurt, once in a while it's a little sensitive to cold stuff.

It's tight back there and hard to brush it good. Mentioned to a dentist on just getting it pulled since I'm not a high roller and have no dental insurance. He said no you need it to chew, don't make your stomach work so much harder with unchewed food, stomach cancer, etc. he said get it repaired or pulled and replaced. Don't just pull it.

Is he right? This is not a money grabbing dentist.
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Old 04-29-2017, 12:27 PM
 
35,109 posts, read 40,193,301 times
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No one here can give you dental/medical advise.
Seek a second opinion from another licensed dentist.
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Old 04-29-2017, 12:37 PM
 
2,221 posts, read 1,094,492 times
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If you don't mind losing a bit of chewing function, sure, but the thing that dentists think about is your chewing function over your lifetime. Pull one tooth here, another tooth there, a couple years later pull another tooth...it doesn't sound like much of a loss each time you do it, but it adds up to loss of chewing function over your lifetime, and each loss may affect the remaining teeth in a detrimental way.

Teeth are small, so they seem insignificant, but each one is important to your health over the long run.
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Old 05-05-2017, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,685 posts, read 1,863,297 times
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I would advise to keep your molars. As a poor single parent, I had several extracted rather than getting a root canal and crown because I could not afford the fee. I now have major bone loss and may need bone grafts to accommodate lower dentures. And you end up chewing on your gums which can cause cancer, something that I am always checking for on my gums.

My son just went through getting his molars repairs, he heeded my warning after seeing just what can happen when you elect to pull your molars.
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Old 05-05-2017, 10:27 AM
 
Location: USA
939 posts, read 513,130 times
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I had a back tooth pulled many decades ago that didn't need to be.

I had a cavity/toothache and got a referral from an out of work actress (maybe they had a fling-thing going on?).

When I went to the dentist he just yanked it. Well, in reality not "just".
He actually had his foot propped on the armrest and had the hygienist or receptionist hold his arm to get two sets of hands!

I've had a couple of dentists question the missing molar years later.

Back then at that age, I didn't know any better about the need to replace it or even to question him as to why the extraction.
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Old 05-05-2017, 08:21 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,750 posts, read 54,373,866 times
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I had a gap back there while awaiting an implant, over close to a year, and it's annoying to have things like peas drop into the space when eating. With dental insurance that implant cost me about $2,000, but was worth it.
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Old 05-07-2017, 01:59 AM
 
9,676 posts, read 15,849,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
If you don't mind losing a bit of chewing function, sure, but the thing that dentists think about is your chewing function over your lifetime. Pull one tooth here, another tooth there, a couple years later pull another tooth...it doesn't sound like much of a loss each time you do it, but it adds up to loss of chewing function over your lifetime, and each loss may affect the remaining teeth in a detrimental way.

Teeth are small, so they seem insignificant, but each one is important to your health over the long run.
Also, each tooth forms a structure that supports the rest. Missing teeth can cause the other teeth to become misaligned, then they develop their problems as well. Also, misaligned teeth can create headaches, sinus problems, decay and cavities because they are difficult to clean, etc.


A friend injured her tooth while in a ski accident. She had the tooth pulled but figured she didn't need an implant, or bridge, etc. After all, it was a back molar, no one sees it, and she was "too young" to bother with dentures, etc--she was 28 at the time. She suffered a lifetime of headaches, and developed TMJ. She died a few years ago, due to a ruptured esophagus. She had


a ton of digestive problems, including a partially necrotized colon that had to be resected. The esophagus ruptured due to excessive vomiting. I'm sure the digestive problems which led to her untimely death were precipitated, at least partially, by her inability to chew properly.


Why do people automatically assume dentists are just "trying to make money?" Of course, we all want/need to make money But you went to him, he didn't chase you down. Unless it was a general cleaning, you probably had a problem that prompted your visit. If you doubt what he's saying, go to another dentist, do NOT tell him about the first visit, and see if he comes up with the same conclusions. Dental care is expensive, I know. I recently had ONE implant. The total, including insurance coverage, was $15000 My OOP portion was $5000. I went to a highly-rated oral surgeon, who was probably more costly, but I was shopping for competence, not price. I'm fortunate we have good dental insurance and the means to pay the difference, but don't go in with a chip on your shoulder that the dentist is just somehow trying to gouge you.


I also have RA--rheumatoid arthritis--and have had several joint replacements. I had a hip replacement done at age 27. The comments I got! He's just trying to make money! He knows you have excellent insurance and wants his portion! Etc, etc.....its not like he just did a hip replacement for the $$$$. My hip was completely eroded, it was nothing but bone-on-bone, it was partially dislocated, and I was in unbearable pain. Its not like he talked me into a hip replacement for no good reason Again, I elected to find the best surgeon in the state of Texas, not the cheapest. I still have that hip, going strong, no problems, no pain.


Sure, there are shyster's out there, in every profession and trade. Don't let that put you off for care you need.
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