U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Dental Health
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-04-2009, 09:11 AM
 
2,423 posts, read 5,432,660 times
Reputation: 2920
I have an implant. I had a back molar that had to be pulled (I am 37 years old by the way) - and the dentist highly recommended an implant to keep my other teeth from shifting, etc..

As I had insurance - that covered about 1/3 of the procedure. Total cost was approx $1500. My cost was $1000.00.

I don't know where a figure of $8000 - $10000 came from. That's VERY high. I went to a dental surgeon (sorry, I'm not good with the technical terms for the different types of dentists) - he was highly recommened and did a great job. My normal dentist (who was the one that suggested I get the implant) had nothing to do with the actual implant procedure and thus could not profit from it in any way.

My normal dentist also said he thought it would be better because if I ever lost a tooth on the other side I could get one more implant and then when I was older it would make it easier to do a fixed appliance ("bridge??") - rather than dentures.

As far as the surgery - very similar to tooth extraction as far as the recovery. A simple procedure in the office - took about 1/2 hour for me under LOCAL anesthetic. (I did not want to be "out"). Afterwards same type of recovery as an extraction - do not suck on a straw, etc..

For me - recovery went great, bone was healthy, implant went well.

I say if you can afford it - great. But I think the price you were quoted was very high, or the procedure must be more complicated that a typical implant.

Good luck to you!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2009, 07:58 PM
 
1 posts, read 15,347 times
Reputation: 11
Default partial vs full dentures or implants?

I have a similar dillemma. I had an abscess after which I learned I need either a partial to replace my back teeth or I have the option of a full upper denture. Financially implants are out of the question, so I have to make a choice that is difficult at best. Has anyone had any adverse experience with a full upper? It appears that is the least expensive option. Also, is it customary for a dentist to expect payment for all the work up front, prior to the appointment?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2009, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
731 posts, read 1,451,846 times
Reputation: 629
In your haste to so "STRONGLY" disagree with my post, you overlooked that I wrote the OP should not BORROW MONEY for implants at his age when a partial is a viable, cheaper alternative. Yes, implants are MUCH better then dentured and partials at ANY age but the OP is concerned about cost. The ROI isn't there at his age, especially when the original implant could fail requiring further work at the OP's expense.

The best "bang for the buck" for the OP is the treatment he can afford and NOT have to borrow money for. This from the perspective of someone who has over $100,000 of implants and related surgeries in her mouth, thankyouverymuch.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Elipar View Post
I have to STRONGLY disagree with the person who said that the OP shouldn't get implants due to his/her age. Just because someone is in their 60s doesn't mean they can't make it to 100, or that they don't need the quality of life that teeth provide.

Implants are a wonderful replacement for missing teeth. They're strong, esthetic, and can be a long-lasting restoration. The procedure is "surgical", but in many cases no worse than having a tooth pulled. Some people do have complications, but that's the same as any other dental procedure. All in all, many more people are satisfied with their implants. The best bang for buck, IMO, is the implant, not the partial denture.

With that said, a partial denture is also a viable alternative. The benefits include lower cost and less invasive treatment. The downside is the psychological aspect of having a partial denture, significant esthetic issues, reduced biting force, and cleaning issues.

Whether the OP should get implants or partial dentures depends on the relative risk/benefit that fits his or her individual situation. No one here will be able to understand your unique perspective, so only you can make the choice that's right for you. I hope this information helps you in your decision-making.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Summerset, SD
310 posts, read 1,876,325 times
Reputation: 457
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbuszu View Post
With all due respect Elipar, you admitted to being an Endodontist in another thread. Thus you very likely make a lot of money selling/installing implants. Thus although knowledgeable, I hardly consider your position objective or unbiased in this particular thread.
Yes, I am an endodontist. Endodontists do root canals. I do not place implants and the vast majority of endodontists do not place implants. I don't have any financial interest in what decisions you are making unless you're a patient of mine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Summerset, SD
310 posts, read 1,876,325 times
Reputation: 457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary_Moon View Post
In your haste to so "STRONGLY" disagree with my post, you overlooked that I wrote the OP should not BORROW MONEY for implants at his age when a partial is a viable, cheaper alternative. Yes, implants are MUCH better then dentured and partials at ANY age but the OP is concerned about cost. The ROI isn't there at his age, especially when the original implant could fail requiring further work at the OP's expense.

The best "bang for the buck" for the OP is the treatment he can afford and NOT have to borrow money for. This from the perspective of someone who has over $100,000 of implants and related surgeries in her mouth, thankyouverymuch.
With all due respect, you can't say the ROI isn't there because neither you nor I know the specifics of the OPs situation beyond the need to borrow money for implants. What psychological and physical impact will there be to missing teeth, lesser esthetics, and increased difficulty eating foods? For some it may be minimal. For others it is life-changing.

There was a lady who had one tooth left. When I extracted it, she began to cry. In her mind, losing that last tooth meant that she felt old. For many, full dentures have the same effect.

The second to last sentence is partially true... the best bang for the buck for the OP is treatment he can afford. Whether it's borrowed or contained in savings, the OP must decide what is best for him and whether it is financially feasible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2009, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 2,475,798 times
Reputation: 875
Very well said Elipar! I worked for a dentist for many years, and although some procedures can be pricey these are your teeth people!
Take care of them because they are expensive to replace.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2009, 09:20 AM
 
14 posts, read 110,456 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbuszu View Post
With all due respect Elipar, you admitted to being an Endodontist in another thread. Thus you very likely make a lot of money selling/installing implants. Thus although knowledgeable, I hardly consider your position objective or unbiased in this particular thread.

Endodontists do root canals. They don't do implants or partials or bridges. Not to my knowlkedge anyway...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2009, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
731 posts, read 1,451,846 times
Reputation: 629
No one is disputing that dental implants are by far the superior choice to replace missing teeth. Due to a congenital defect, I wore dentures from the age of 14 until just last year at the age 37 and can attest to the damaging affect they have on bone structure, their limited biting power and lack of aesthetic appeal. Because of atrophy, I had several painful surgeries and bone grafts including a sinus lift and LeFort I advancement just to get my mouth prepared to accept all the implants that needed to be placed. I am completely thrilled with the final outcome and would do every single bit again in a heartbeat. Our major medical insurance wouldn't cover dental issues (yes, we fought it to the bitter end) and we have a annual ceiling of $1500 on dental work. My out of pocket costs for treatment was astronomical but absolutely worth every penny. We were fortunate for the ability to pay for my treatment without financing or wiping out our savings.

However, the OP was asking for an opinion between getting a partial and spending cash she doesn't have on hand for implants. And, since she stated that the "one next to it has been missing for years" one can infer that losing a tooth is not a traumatic, life-altering experience - one that requires her to go out and borrow money to pay for a more expensive treatment than she requires, both physically and psychologically.

I would expect a responsible dental professional to look at the case objectively and not simply suggest implants as a knee-jerk reaction because they are the gold standard. At the OP's age and financial status, a professional should have leaned more toward the partial route but making sure to educate her on the benefits of filling the empty socket with bone-graft material to avoid socket collapse. A much cheaper but still viable option for ridge preservation and bite restoration, especially in this particular case.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2009, 06:54 PM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
5,177 posts, read 9,826,729 times
Reputation: 3872
I have both partials upper and lower. When the OP's age a dentist of mine tried to talk me into a bone implant. He was a specialist in the field and knew that I as a business owner could afford the implant and that my bone structure would support the implant. I said NO. He gave me a price of $3000 then.

Today I'm 78 and still doing okay with what I had then and now.

Steve
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2009, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Summerset, SD
310 posts, read 1,876,325 times
Reputation: 457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary_Moon View Post
I mean this is the nicest possible way, but at your age, I wouldn't suggest borrowing money for dental implants. A partial can be uncomfortable and difficult to get used to, but it is way cheaper than a couple of implants. Since it's a back tooth, you'll probably find yourself leaving the partial out, anyway. Yes, the upper teeth will eventually drop down slightly to move into the empty space below, but again, at your age it doesn't really matter. If you were in your 40's then it would be worth it to get implants to keep the other teeth and jawbone stable. In your case the return on investment just isn't there.

My experience with dental implants has been wonderful. I've had few issues, the most serious was a failed bone graft, but as is the case with all medicine, no treatment is 100% guaranteed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elipar View Post
I have to STRONGLY disagree with the person who said that the OP shouldn't get implants due to his/her age. Just because someone is in their 60s doesn't mean they can't make it to 100, or that they don't need the quality of life that teeth provide.

Implants are a wonderful replacement for missing teeth. They're strong, esthetic, and can be a long-lasting restoration. The procedure is "surgical", but in many cases no worse than having a tooth pulled. Some people do have complications, but that's the same as any other dental procedure. All in all, many more people are satisfied with their implants. The best bang for buck, IMO, is the implant, not the partial denture.

With that said, a partial denture is also a viable alternative. The benefits include lower cost and less invasive treatment. The downside is the psychological aspect of having a partial denture, significant esthetic issues, reduced biting force, and cleaning issues.

Whether the OP should get implants or partial dentures depends on the relative risk/benefit that fits his or her individual situation. No one here will be able to understand your unique perspective, so only you can make the choice that's right for you. I hope this information helps you in your decision-making.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary_Moon View Post
No one is disputing that dental implants are by far the superior choice to replace missing teeth. Due to a congenital defect, I wore dentures from the age of 14 until just last year at the age 37 and can attest to the damaging affect they have on bone structure, their limited biting power and lack of aesthetic appeal. Because of atrophy, I had several painful surgeries and bone grafts including a sinus lift and LeFort I advancement just to get my mouth prepared to accept all the implants that needed to be placed. I am completely thrilled with the final outcome and would do every single bit again in a heartbeat. Our major medical insurance wouldn't cover dental issues (yes, we fought it to the bitter end) and we have a annual ceiling of $1500 on dental work. My out of pocket costs for treatment was astronomical but absolutely worth every penny. We were fortunate for the ability to pay for my treatment without financing or wiping out our savings.

However, the OP was asking for an opinion between getting a partial and spending cash she doesn't have on hand for implants. And, since she stated that the "one next to it has been missing for years" one can infer that losing a tooth is not a traumatic, life-altering experience - one that requires her to go out and borrow money to pay for a more expensive treatment than she requires, both physically and psychologically.

I would expect a responsible dental professional to look at the case objectively and not simply suggest implants as a knee-jerk reaction because they are the gold standard. At the OP's age and financial status, a professional should have leaned more toward the partial route but making sure to educate her on the benefits of filling the empty socket with bone-graft material to avoid socket collapse. A much cheaper but still viable option for ridge preservation and bite restoration, especially in this particular case.
This will be my last post on dental issues. There's a lot of misinformation on these boards, and I do my best to provide objective information from a professional point of view. In return, I get my integrity, professionalism, and motives questioned. No more.

If you look at my original post, show me where I state that the OP *MUST* get implants. You won't find it, because I did not say that. The last part of my original post states that the person should understand the advantages and disadvantages and analyze the personal situation. It's essentially what you think a professional should do, but for some bizarre reason you think I'm not doing so.

The issue for me was never about implants to begin with. It was about age-discrimination. I'm sick and tired of people who think that older people deserve a lesser quality of life. Why should age restrict someone from benefiting from a health-enhancing treatment? Again, I'm not saying that older people should all get implants. What I'm saying is that they should have the OPTION to have implants, and not be told that it's not right for them.

Bottom line: as a professional, I present ALL options and do not ASSUME that the OP can't have implants. If his or her personal situation means that financial constraints are too much, then implants are out.

Flame away. I won't be around to hear it.

Last edited by Elipar; 12-15-2009 at 10:00 PM.. Reason: grammar
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Dental Health
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:35 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top