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Unread 07-09-2010, 11:28 AM
 
5 posts, read 10,901 times
Reputation: 11
Default 24 yr. old young professional moving to Denver - need your input!

I'm a 24-year-old aspiring real estate investor/developer born and raised on the Jersey shore (and no its NOTHING like the TV show) and seriously considering moving to Denver. I've traveled the country - been in 44 states and hundreds of cities/towns - and can honestly say that Denver was the most impressive, mind-blowing city I visited. I have a few questions that I'm hoping you guys can answer me and help me along my journey.

1. Where is the best area for someone like me to live? I'm looking an urban setting, tons of nightlife, highly populated with other young professionals, and much to do in terms of outdoors (parks, shopping, etc.). I've done extensive research and it seems as if Capitol Hill, Highlands and Washington Park might be best. Do you agree?

2. All I hear from people who live there and from the big magazine lists (Forbes rating it one of the best cities for singles, safest cities, etc.) is that it is absolutely AMAZING. Do you find it hard for people that grew up on the ocean to be able to make the adjustment to being landlocked? Stupid as it may sound, this is one of my biggest fears of moving.

3. For the younger crowd or people who are active in the nightlife scene - do you find the Denver scene to get old quickly? I've spent my life an hour from NYC, Philly and Atlantic City so I'm extremely spoiled when it comes to options.

4. Sounds crazy but i've read on this board that there is definitely a much larger population of men opposed to women and that it has affected some people's way of life..is this a common notion in Denver or just the opinion of few?

5. I've heard from some that people in Denver tend to be a little more introverted - that its difficult to meet people. Is this true? I find it hard to believe its harder than Jersey - as many of you know, we tend to have a bit of an attitude.

Thank you, I really hope you can spare a few minutes and give me some feedback. This move is the biggest decision of my life and although I'll be out there in a few weeks in hopes to either solidify or nullify my decision, your opinions would be greatly valued and appreciated.
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Unread 07-09-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,457 posts, read 12,973,688 times
Reputation: 4354
Quote:
Originally Posted by RML213 View Post
I'm a 24-year-old aspiring real estate investor/developer
Which type of real estate development are you into? Suburban/rural sprawl or urban redevelopment? If it's the latter, I think Denver has a lot of potential once the economy picks back up.

Quote:
born and raised on the Jersey shore (and no its NOTHING like the TV show) and seriously considering moving to Denver. I've traveled the country - been in 44 states and hundreds of cities/towns - and can honestly say that Denver was the most impressive, mind-blowing city I visited. I have a few questions that I'm hoping you guys can answer me and help me along my journey.
Are you for real? This is the first time I've ever heard Denver described as "mind blowing."

Quote:
1. Where is the best area for someone like me to live? I'm looking an urban setting, tons of nightlife, highly populated with other young professionals, and much to do in terms of outdoors (parks, shopping, etc.). I've done extensive research and it seems as if Capitol Hill, Highlands and Washington Park might be best. Do you agree?
Capitol Hill is definitely the most "urban" neighborhood in Denver in the common sense of the word. And then other than living in downtown/LoDo itself, 2nd most "urban" neighborhood would be the South Broadway area in between 6th Ave & Alameda. There are other areas that are just as dense and maybe even moreso, but poorer and grittier with more walkable necessities and practical stores and more working class people, Spanish language signs everywhere, fewer "young professionals" and pretentious wannabe urban hipsters. Highlands isn't really all that urban, it's kind of like a small town within a big city, pretty mellow. Washington Park is a great place for people watching-- people come to the park from all over to jog with their dogs-- but the neighborhood isn't urban at all, it's an old suburb.

Truthfully, Denver as a whole really isn't all that urban. I can show you neighborhoods in L.A. that make the trendiest, hippest, most urban neighborhoods in Denver look stupid.

Quote:
the big magazine lists (Forbes rating it one of the best cities for singles, safest cities, etc.) is that it is absolutely AMAZING.
Those "lists" should be exposed as nothing more than the toilet literature that they are. They're only bound to set people up for disappointment. Go back in the archives and read posts from former residents "funkymonk" and "jjacobeclark." They, like you, had all these great ideas about Denver they heard about and after they moved here ended up becoming the most bitter, disillusioned trolls on this forum and ended up leaving. I wish people would do their own research and exploration and come to their own conclusions, not rely on what they've "heard" and "read."

Quote:
Do you find it hard for people that grew up on the ocean to be able to make the adjustment to being landlocked? Stupid as it may sound, this is one of my biggest fears of moving.
Can't answer that, since I grew up here. I kind of feel "landlocked" in a sense that everything worth exploring is out to the west. Everything between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean is God's country. In the other 180 degrees, out east it's basically a wasteland with nothing to do, nothing to see, nowhere to visit, everything is fenced off and sectioned into square mile grids, no public land to explore, almost no wilderness/ virgin prairie is left, all the original buffalo who roamed the plains killed off, the Indians gone, no significant population centers until you get to at least eastern Kansas. I also felt "landlocked" when I lived in LA for a year, 'coz once you hit the beach there's nothing left to explore-- unless you're a sailor.

Quote:
3. For the younger crowd or people who are active in the nightlife scene - do you find the Denver scene to get old quickly? I've spent my life an hour from NYC, Philly and Atlantic City so I'm extremely spoiled when it comes to options.
I don't know what "scene" you're into in particular, but I think you're going to be disappointed with the selection here. The "scene" here is centered mainly on beer drinking.

Quote:
4. Sounds crazy but i've read on this board that there is definitely a much larger population of men opposed to women and that it has affected some people's way of life..is this a common notion in Denver or just the opinion of few?
Look up the data on the US Census website, on quickfacts. At most we're talking about a 1% or 2% difference, if even that. Which does make a difference, I guess. And it's not unique to Denver. Almost every city west of Mississippi River, with only 2 or 3 exceptions, has a majority male population. Almost every city on the eastern side of the country with just a handful of exceptions has a majority female population.

Quote:
although I'll be out there in a few weeks in hopes to either solidify or nullify my decision, your opinions would be greatly valued and appreciated.
Glad to hear that. Come out and see for yourself. Try talking to people, see how sociable people are, how easy it is to meet people when you're here. Sample the nightlife for yourself. Then please come back here and write to us how it went!

Conclusion: There's a lot of places that can be great places to live-- Denver included-- if you have a good job or run a business that makes money, and have a good network of friends (and/or family, if that's important to you). But without that, the place that looks the greatest on paper can end up sucking royally.
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Unread 07-14-2010, 10:04 AM
 
36 posts, read 62,101 times
Reputation: 24
1. For places to live, those three neighborhoods you've listed would be good options. I'm 25 and I've lived two places in Capitol Hill/Cheeseman Park and I love this neighborhood. Personally, I would shy away from Wash Park for a few reasons. One, it's pricey. Second, It's full of families and I really enjoy living in a place with a lot of young people and no kids at this point in my life. I would add Baker to your list of possible places and also I would check out Uptown.

2. I can't really say how you would do out here without the ocean. It would depend on how attached you are to living by the shore. I do have a friend who moved from the coast and she says she's a total "water baby". We go up to the mountain lakes and she seems to get her fix that way

3. I moved here from philly and I found that they philly got old very quickly because it seemed like the same clubs and bars over and over. There were great places to go in philly that were off the beaten path but a pain to get to and usually in the unsafe areas (south philly, west philly, northern liberties). So I spent a lot of cabs, which sucked. I love the nightlife out here and everything is relatively close. If you are really into the east coast-style clubs (aka put on your shiny shirt and pay $15 for a drink), then it might get old. If you like dive bars, awesome brewpubs, a variety of live music and so many other things to do that have nothing to do with bars (bike rallies, BBQ's, underground raves) then you'll love it like I do.

4. I think that the male/female ratio is blown out of proportion by the media. Just rely on your natural charms and you'll be fine

5. I find it very easy to meet people if you get involved in things. There are tons of other transplants just like you looking to meet new friends. Here's what worked for me: meetup.com, activities you already enjoy (biking, hiking, camping, etc) and introduce yourself to your neighbors.

Good luck with everything! PM me if you have more Q's.
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Unread 07-17-2010, 12:16 AM
 
10 posts, read 16,099 times
Reputation: 20
Lol. Mindblowing?

Yes it's safer than most places, cleaner and pretty, but if it's nightlife you're after, don't count on it. People are more laid back and friendly here than in the bigger cities.
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Unread 07-18-2010, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
3,517 posts, read 4,363,780 times
Reputation: 1248
Quote:
Originally Posted by RML213 View Post
1. Where is the best area for someone like me to live? I'm looking an urban setting, tons of nightlife, highly populated with other young professionals, and much to do in terms of outdoors (parks, shopping, etc.). I've done extensive research and it seems as if Capitol Hill, Highlands and Washington Park might be best. Do you agree?
Agreed. These will give you the most urban experience you'll find in Denver. However it's not urban in the sense that San Francisco, New York, or Boston are urban. It's two or three notches below that.

Quote:
2. All I hear from people who live there and from the big magazine lists (Forbes rating it one of the best cities for singles, safest cities, etc.) is that it is absolutely AMAZING.
Denver's okay. When compared to the rest of the U.S., I'd consider it in my top five favorite cities. However, if given the choice between living in Denver, and living in San Francisco, Boston or NYC I'd choose one of the latter. I would even choose San Diego over Denver.

Quote:
Do you find it hard for people that grew up on the ocean to be able to make the adjustment to being landlocked? Stupid as it may sound, this is one of my biggest fears of moving.
When you're moving to Denver, you're trading oceans for mountains. Mountains are equally appealing. They've got their own awe and beauty. I find them equally attractive.

Quote:
3. For the younger crowd or people who are active in the nightlife scene - do you find the Denver scene to get old quickly?
There's downtown (16th street) and there's quite a lot of nightclubs along Colfax ave and venues along South Broadway. If you enjoy going to bars and nightclubs because you like to meet your friends there, talk, have a good time, then you'll be okay in Denver.

Quote:
4. Sounds crazy but i've read on this board that there is definitely a much larger population of men opposed to women and that it has affected some people's way of life..is this a common notion in Denver or just the opinion of few?
Denver is a draw to outdoors minded people, which tends to favor the men because men are probably more likely to uproot and move somewhere just to have access to skiing and backpacking.

Quote:
5. I've heard from some that people in Denver tend to be a little more introverted - that its difficult to meet people. Is this true? I find it hard to believe its harder than Jersey - as many of you know, we tend to have a bit of an attitude.
In general, people in Denver are a little reserved. They're not cold and frigid, but they're not particularly open and warm either. Part of this is the culture of the West and part of it is the attraction for outdoors-minded people who tend to prefer a little more isolation and tranquility in their lives.
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Unread 04-23-2013, 04:23 PM
 
10 posts, read 8,384 times
Reputation: 14
i agree - Denver looks great on paper and its a really fun place to visit on vacation. Which is why 50% of the population are transplants from somewhere else. Everyone comes here for a visit and thinks its the greatest place on earth. Yes, the weather is great, the mountains are fun, cost of living is low compared to other urban areas, etc...for someone who is 24, i cant think of a better city to spend a few years in. This is what most young people do in Denver. They come for a few years because they just got out of college and want to explore some place new and Denver offers a reasonable cost of living for that. But as people get older, they realize that the mountains are really not that exciting anymore, and Denver too, is not exciting.

There is absolutely no diversity here. There are few cool restaurants/bars in the washpark, and downtown area....but they get old, fast. The night life downtown is definitely catered to the alcoholic 22 yr old college grad who still enjoys blacking out and throwing up on innocent strangers. The suburbs are extremely cookie cutter...everything looks exactly the same. EVERY SINGLE restaurant is a chain. An earlier post talked about the eastern plains being a wasteland...that is 100% true.

So the moral of my post is...if you're 24 and looking for a new city, then you will be VERY happy in Denver. I've loved my time out here but i've outgrown it fast. I am also from the east coast and I find the lack of diversity to be very boring. I miss the older, very distinct neighborhoods of the northeast. If you travel 5 miles in the northeast, everything will have a completelt different look and feel. If you go to Colorado Springs, Denver, Fort Collins, Vail...everything is going to seem the same. Makes exploring and "getting away" very boring.

As far as people? People are very approachable and easy to talk to here. But i find they're kindness and friendliness is very skin deep. I think this fakeness is consistent with people you'd find in California. Not my preference as far as people go...
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Unread 04-23-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Denver - Wash Park
1,261 posts, read 634,591 times
Reputation: 981
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassMatt View Post
i agree - Denver looks great on paper and its a really fun place to visit on vacation. Which is why 50% of the population are transplants from somewhere else. Everyone comes here for a visit and thinks its the greatest place on earth. Yes, the weather is great, the mountains are fun, cost of living is low compared to other urban areas, etc...for someone who is 24, i cant think of a better city to spend a few years in. This is what most young people do in Denver. They come for a few years because they just got out of college and want to explore some place new and Denver offers a reasonable cost of living for that. But as people get older, they realize that the mountains are really not that exciting anymore, and Denver too, is not exciting.

There is absolutely no diversity here. There are few cool restaurants/bars in the washpark, and downtown area....but they get old, fast. The night life downtown is definitely catered to the alcoholic 22 yr old college grad who still enjoys blacking out and throwing up on innocent strangers. The suburbs are extremely cookie cutter...everything looks exactly the same. EVERY SINGLE restaurant is a chain. An earlier post talked about the eastern plains being a wasteland...that is 100% true.

So the moral of my post is...if you're 24 and looking for a new city, then you will be VERY happy in Denver. I've loved my time out here but i've outgrown it fast. I am also from the east coast and I find the lack of diversity to be very boring. I miss the older, very distinct neighborhoods of the northeast. If you travel 5 miles in the northeast, everything will have a completelt different look and feel. If you go to Colorado Springs, Denver, Fort Collins, Vail...everything is going to seem the same. Makes exploring and "getting away" very boring.

As far as people? People are very approachable and easy to talk to here. But i find they're kindness and friendliness is very skin deep. I think this fakeness is consistent with people you'd find in California. Not my preference as far as people go...
Every single restaurant is a chain and Denver, Ft. Collins, Co Springs and Vail are all the same?? Are you sure you've been to those cites?


To the OP: Denver is a very good city, but there are better cites if that's your thing. People who really enjoy life here take advantage of the things that being in Denver gets you close to. The people I know who have moved here and not been happy rarely if ever go skiing, hiking, fishing, snow shoeing, kayaking, etc..... They also don't drink craft beer.

Now I'm not saying that in order to be happy, you must partake in the above listed activities. They are just the things that set Denver apart from so many other places in my opinion.

Last edited by SkyDog77; 04-23-2013 at 05:09 PM..
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Unread 04-24-2013, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
3,517 posts, read 4,363,780 times
Reputation: 1248
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassMatt View Post
But as people get older, they realize that the mountains are really not that exciting anymore
I disagree. Someone who truly loves the mountains never tires of them.

Quote:
, and Denver too, is not exciting.
I agree with this.

Quote:
There is absolutely no diversity here. There are few cool restaurants/bars in the washpark, and downtown area....but they get old, fast. <snip ...> EVERY SINGLE restaurant is a chain.
Denver is a basically a "big town", rather than a "small city."
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Unread 04-24-2013, 11:25 PM
 
479 posts, read 741,375 times
Reputation: 309
> I've traveled the country - been in 44 states and hundreds of cities/towns - and can honestly say that Denver was the most impressive, mind-blowing city I visited.

Really? I love Denver, but compared to, say, Chicago, you found Denver mind-blowing?

> 1. Where is the best area for someone like me to live? I'm looking an urban setting, tons of nightlife, highly populated with other young professionals, and much to do in terms of outdoors
> (parks, shopping, etc.). I've done extensive research and it seems as if Capitol Hill, Highlands and Washington Park might be best. Do you agree?

Out of those I'd go with Capitol Hill. You have a nice mix there of restaurants, urban life, parks, shopping, etc. Highlands is nice, but relatively small and focused on restaurants - and it's expensive for what it is. Washington Park is beautiful but it's essentially a suburb within the city.

> 2. All I hear from people who live there and from the big magazine lists (Forbes rating it one of the best cities for singles, safest cities, etc.) is that it is absolutely AMAZING. Do you find it hard
> for people that grew up on the ocean to be able to make the adjustment to being landlocked? Stupid as it may sound, this is one of my biggest fears of moving.

It depends what you enjoy about the ocean. Do you just like looking at it? Then you can get on a flight and be in San Diego in two hours. If you like sailing, boating, etc. there are plenty of large lakes in and around the Denver area. If you're really into ocean activities - scuba diving, etc. then you might find Denver a bit off-putting. At least for me, the mountains more than make up for the lack of ocean.

As far as those Forbes ratings go, take it with a grain of salt. People's ratings of things tend to be very different depending on how things are phrased. Denver's a terrific city, but is it absolutely one of the best for singles, safety, etc? Depends where you are.

> 3. For the younger crowd or people who are active in the nightlife scene - do you find the Denver scene to get old quickly? I've spent my life an hour from NYC, Philly and Atlantic City so I'm
> extremely spoiled when it comes to options.

Denver has a nightlife, but it's less than, say, Chicago, and certainly way less than New York. Plenty to do here, but the options are going to be the same as similarly sized cities (Portland, etc.)

> 4. Sounds crazy but i've read on this board that there is definitely a much larger population of men opposed to women and that it has affected some people's way of life..is this a common
> notion in Denver or just the opinion of few?

I've heard that too - the "Menver" thing - and I don't think it's true. There's lots of single women here.

> 5. I've heard from some that people in Denver tend to be a little more introverted - that its difficult to meet people. Is this true? I find it hard to believe its harder than Jersey - as many of you
> know, we tend to have a bit of an attitude.

Not to my experience. I've had a much harder time meeting people in east coast cities - Boston, etc - than in very friendly Denver, which strikes me as more midwestern in spirit.
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Unread 04-26-2013, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,635 posts, read 1,869,296 times
Reputation: 1199
1. Sounds like Lodo is the perfect place for you. It's the "hippest" area of town. It's also the most expensive but probably not compared to the New York area (1br = approx. $1500/mo). You can walk to hundreds of bars/restaurants/clubs. And you are right by the Platte River park and bike trail. A place like Cap Hill would be about $500 less/month but it has a completely different vibe.

2. I lived right at the beach in Santa Monica and I (almost) never miss it. I'd rather go to the mountains. As someone else mentioned, you can catch a cheap flight to San Diego if you really want to go to the beach.

3. Denver has great nightlife for a city this size but there is no comparison to a place like New York. Keep in mind there are no real cities within 1000 miles of Denver so this is pretty much it. I've never been bored here though.
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