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Old 09-11-2011, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Pensacola, Florida
711 posts, read 688,510 times
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I'm new on here after a friend mentioned it and it has been cool to read about Colorado.

For several reasons I've been researching the state and specifically the Denver area as a potential second home. I grew up in the South, moved to New England for a while and now on the Gulf Coast.

Without too many of my crazy details yet, lol, I have some initial questions.

Who knows anything about the Meadowlark Cooperative out in Agate? Lots of press last year about giving away free land. Not my cup of tea, but intrigues me. Yet, I can find very little more about that place. Agate seems very remote.

Which is sort of what has fascinated me about the area. I'm amazed that Denver is such a large city, yet you can drive an hour to the east on an Interstate and be in the middle of nowhere. That doesn't exist much in the east.

I'm very interested in these random small towns along I70 eastbound.

I earn most of my income online, so I'd like to have some acreage but be able to drive less than an hour to big city amenities (healthcare, airport, arts, sports).

Why are these towns so remote? No one wants the 'lowly' high plains?
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Old 09-12-2011, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,237 posts, read 24,403,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PcolaFLGuy View Post
I earn most of my income online, so I'd like to have some acreage but be able to drive less than an hour to big city amenities (healthcare, airport, arts, sports).

Why are these towns so remote? No one wants the 'lowly' high plains?
Apparently not.

IMO, these towns aren't that remote, I mean, much of them have highways or even I's 70 or 76 going through them. They may even have running water and electricity.

In many cases, you would be driving more than an hour to big city amenities.

I'm not a huge fan of the Eastern Plains (I wouldn't really call them the "high plains", they decrease in elevation until you get to the Flint Hills in KS). They are barren, mostly flat, and the most exciting thing you might see all day is the freeway (if you're lucky enough to live in a town that has one). Some of the towns come off as friendly, others, not so much.

Be sure to visit. I enjoy my trips out there, but I don't know if I could break down and live in one (unless you also really have an affinity for Western KS: they are basically same/same).
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Old 09-12-2011, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Pensacola, Florida
711 posts, read 688,510 times
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I hear ya. But realize everything is 'high' there to me. I live at sea level.

I'm mainly interested in the first few towns to the east of Denver on I70 before Agate and Limon. Watkins, Bennet, Strasburg, Deer Trail, etc.

I'm wanting to find some land and go for the bug-out cabin method until the hardcore winter arrives, then come back to the beach.
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Old 09-12-2011, 12:49 AM
 
11,256 posts, read 43,359,526 times
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Those little towns east of Denver are neither remote nor isolated. Many are typical of the little towns of agrarian communities formed along the railroad corridors, with a grain elevator or livestock handling facilities.

Within an hour of Denver, many could be characterized as bedroom communities serving the front range cities for folk who wanted a larger parcel of (relatively) inexpensive land to live on, and a place to keep horses/dogs/other livestock, possible do some dryland wheat farming, and other agrarian/ranching hobby businesses ... with some getting into serious acreage and productive ability.

They are still on the "high plains", in a wide-open swath of lands that can have severe weather patterns in any given year. Strong gusty winds, intense rain storms, dry lightning storms, thunderstorms, with colder than front range temps in the winter and hotter in the summer.
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:13 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,237 posts, read 24,403,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PcolaFLGuy View Post
I'm wanting to find some land and go for the bug-out cabin method until the hardcore winter arrives
^This tells me you are imagining a different place.

Sunsprit described the climate accurately, but these towns aren't the type of place where you have to buckle down for prolonged cold spells (or flee because of them, generally). Yeah, for some bad snowstorms I-70 closes from Tower Rd to Kansas, but it's usually short-lived, and it's not like the area turns into Siberia come winter.
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Old 09-12-2011, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,708,587 times
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See my thread about these towns including photo tours of Watkins, Bennett, Strasburg, and Byers:

I-70 small towns east of Denver -- PHOTO TOUR
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Old 09-12-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Pensacola, Florida
711 posts, read 688,510 times
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Vegas, saw your photos last night. Great thread and pics.

I'm choosing the wrong vocabulary here. By remote, I meant sparsely populated. And no doubt it's not going to be Siberia (but any snow is basically Siberia to me, lol.)

It actually sounds so very appealing. I know small towns (grew up in Alabama), so that doesn't scare me. I want wide open land, few neighbors, relaxed building restrictions - as I probalby won't go with a traditional shelter structure (possibly a yurt or dome).

But I want to be able to drive into the city (even if I have to get a room) and enjoy things. I'm a big sports fan, love the theater/Opera, etc.

But thanks for you comments, so far. It helps.

I guess I was mainly just confirming why these 'bedroom' communities aren't any more populated being so close to Denver. That doesn't happen in the south. On any Interstate around here, things have sprawled consume tiny towns like that.

I'm tired of sprawl. I want people/city when I want them, and don't when I don't. =)
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,271,626 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by PcolaFLGuy View Post
Vegas, saw your photos last night. Great thread and pics.

I'm choosing the wrong vocabulary here. By remote, I meant sparsely populated. And no doubt it's not going to be Siberia (but any snow is basically Siberia to me, lol.)

It actually sounds so very appealing. I know small towns (grew up in Alabama), so that doesn't scare me. I want wide open land, few neighbors, relaxed building restrictions - as I probalby won't go with a traditional shelter structure (possibly a yurt or dome).

But I want to be able to drive into the city (even if I have to get a room) and enjoy things. I'm a big sports fan, love the theater/Opera, etc.

But thanks for you comments, so far. It helps.

I guess I was mainly just confirming why these 'bedroom' communities aren't any more populated being so close to Denver. That doesn't happen in the south. On any Interstate around here, things have sprawled consume tiny towns like that.

I'm tired of sprawl. I want people/city when I want them, and don't when I don't. =)
I think because many people perceive those little towns on the plains to be unattractive. There are so few trees, nothing to do, isolation. You couldn't pay me to live out there, but then I'm a city person. But you are correct that if that's the type of situation you like, you can have a feeling of being in the middle of nowhere but still be an hour from a big city. It may be kind of unique in that way.
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Old 09-12-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Pensacola, Florida
711 posts, read 688,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
you can have a feeling of being in the middle of nowhere but still be an hour from a big city. It may be kind of unique in that way.
This is what I was thinking. And you're correct in saying that is unique. I certainly doesn't happen in the east, or at least anywhere I think would be cool to live.

As I mentioned, Pensacola is in the middle of a sprawled out mess. I like it here. But just here, in town. Not an hour (or two) in any direction. Talk about feeling isolated, just in a different way. New Orleans in 3.5 hours, Atlanta 5 and 'real' Florida more than that.

I want to move between here and somewhere, possibly there. I fantasize about a hybrid grid/off-grid scenario. Power when I want it, but being able to survive it went out, etc. I'm in a major pre-planning stage of this. But trying to determine the right area for me.

I have many criteria and this place has caught my eye.
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,271,626 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by PcolaFLGuy View Post
This is what I was thinking. And you're correct in saying that is unique. I certainly doesn't happen in the east, or at least anywhere I think would be cool to live.

As I mentioned, Pensacola is in the middle of a sprawled out mess. I like it here. But just here, in town. Not an hour (or two) in any direction. Talk about feeling isolated, just in a different way. New Orleans in 3.5 hours, Atlanta 5 and 'real' Florida more than that.

I want to move between here and somewhere, possibly there. I fantasize about a hybrid grid/off-grid scenario. Power when I want it, but being able to survive it went out, etc. I'm in a major pre-planning stage of this. But trying to determine the right area for me.

I have many criteria and this place has caught my eye.
I'm guessing that land would be relatively cheap out on the plains. If you're not too far out, you could still see the mountains... another plus. And if you can figure out how to make money off tumble weeds, you'll be set
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