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Old 01-26-2012, 02:58 AM
 
40 posts, read 65,384 times
Reputation: 55

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Know I'm late to the game here. But as a life-long Los Angeleno (Westside) who moved to Denver (Capitol Hill) in '09, I'm compelled to chime in. Don't rule out the city. The walkability factor is a major, major plus --we walk our kids to school, not to mention DPS is 1000x better than LAUSD.

Unless you love Glendale/Inland Empire/Rancho Cucamonga in So.Cal. think twice about the Denver suburbs. Stapleton is just glorified soul-sucking tract homes, let's be honest, and Tallys Reach one big Christian community.

Like you, we came to CO with decent money from the sale of our LA house. We picked up a gorgeous 5000 sqft historical 1902 home for next to nothing, compared to LA. My husband drives to DIA everyday (air traffic controller) and the trade-off commute to life in the heart of the city is well worth it.

Yes its funny when Denverites say they've got 'terrible' traffic. Coming from LA, its really nothing.

So take a tour through Denver's prestigious neighborhoods, it might change your mind..
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,178,507 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by boilingblacksea View Post
Know I'm late to the game here. But as a life-long Los Angeleno (Westside) who moved to Denver (Capitol Hill) in '09, I'm compelled to chime in. Don't rule out the city. The walkability factor is a major, major plus --we walk our kids to school, not to mention DPS is 1000x better than LAUSD.

Unless you love Glendale/Inland Empire/Rancho Cucamonga in So.Cal. think twice about the Denver suburbs. Stapleton is just glorified soul-sucking tract homes, let's be honest, and Tallys Reach one big Christian community.

Like you, we came to CO with decent money from the sale of our LA house. We picked up a gorgeous 5000 sqft historical 1902 home for next to nothing, compared to LA. My husband drives to DIA everyday (air traffic controller) and the trade-off commute to life in the heart of the city is well worth it.

Yes its funny when Denverites say they've got 'terrible' traffic. Coming from LA, its really nothing.

So take a tour through Denver's prestigious neighborhoods, it might change your mind..
Soul sucking? lol! Yes, we're all zombies living so far out here, 7 miles from the center of downtown.

I love Capital Hill too, but Stapleton is more kid friendly. If I had no kids, Cap. Hill may have been a better choice for us. But I also enjoy not having a house that needs constant attention.
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Old 01-26-2012, 01:35 PM
WiW
 
Location: Denver CO
167 posts, read 513,868 times
Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by boilingblacksea View Post
.... Stapleton is just glorified soul-sucking tract homes, let's be honest,...
I understand that Stapleton has tract housing, but the housing is quite varied - in fact, I find it a lot more varied than neighborhoods closer in with their uniform brick bungalows.

But I don't get the "soul-sucking" part. I hear that in a lot of people's comments about the suburbs & tract housing. How does the type of housing create a soul-sucking environment? As the previous poster said, Stapleton is just 7 mi from downtown - 11 minutes by car the other day. So commute time could hardly be deemed soul-sucking.

Someone please explain because we're buying in Stapleton & if there is something to that, I'd rather understand it now.
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Old 01-26-2012, 01:53 PM
 
694 posts, read 1,786,698 times
Reputation: 479
I think a lot of the "soul sucking" comments about the suburbs is directly tied to its prevalence of horrific design. No one likes strip malls, big box stores, and giant parking lots--they look like s*%#. I hate them, but also recognize their utility.

They are the cheapest and easiest way to build and they do provide services and goods people need at (mostly) reasonable prices. I would love for everywhere in the US to look beautiful, walkable, and full of character but the market decides to a great extent what our landscape looks like (government policy is also very important). Developers don't want to spend the money and time to design things well, and God knows many people don't want (or can't) pay $.50 more for a pair of fair trade socks purchased from a shop in a beautiful, pedestrian friendly building.

I think Stapleton recognizes both the economic reality of development and the need people have for good design, I think it looks great. I also have friends who live there and love it and they don't appear to have lost any fraction of their souls from Stapleton's suburban design, although they did recently buy a garden gnome--perhaps they are just now getting infected.
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Old 01-27-2012, 05:31 AM
 
40 posts, read 65,384 times
Reputation: 55
.

Stapleton was designed by a supposed New Urbanist project. It's 1500 acres of residential pods, a large mall, open space and a small "village" center. But it is on a grid. Gridded sprawl.
This poorly designed project is under constant criticism, and now cited as a place where walking is hazardous --because in the absence of numerous narrow through streets, people end up being exposed to too much fast traffic on the major thoroughfares serving the suburbs.

Denver's old-fashioned neighborhoods, aka Park Hill, Capitol Hill, Wash Park, with a grid and plenty of through streets are considered safer for pedestrians.
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Old 01-27-2012, 06:53 AM
 
694 posts, read 1,786,698 times
Reputation: 479
I would agree about the street safety problems in Stapleton, they did a poor job in respect to that. It isn't perfect by a long shot, but it's still better IMO than some of Denver's other suburban areas. There are parts of Stapleton I like a lot--others, not so much.
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,178,507 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by boilingblacksea View Post
.

Stapleton was designed by a supposed New Urbanist project. It's 1500 acres of residential pods, a large mall, open space and a small "village" center. But it is on a grid. Gridded sprawl.
This poorly designed project is under constant criticism, and now cited as a place where walking is hazardous --because in the absence of numerous narrow through streets, people end up being exposed to too much fast traffic on the major thoroughfares serving the suburbs.

Denver's old-fashioned neighborhoods, aka Park Hill, Capitol Hill, Wash Park, with a grid and plenty of through streets are considered safer for pedestrians.
lol! You just sound like a hater. Constant criticism? Hardly. Thousands of people live here and love it. One traffic incident in 10 years doesn't mean Stapleton is any more dangerous than Cap. Hill. You're telling me no one has EVER been hit by a car in Cap. Hill? I walk through Cap. Hill on my lunch breaks almost every week day and trust me, there are plenty of chances to get run over. People fly down all the one way streets and run lights. I've seen it plenty of times. I feel safer walking in Stapleton than Cap. Hill.

So if you hate it so much, stay away and don't buy a house here. Houses are selling as fast as they build them, so obviously plenty of people think differently from you.
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,178,507 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by WiW View Post
I understand that Stapleton has tract housing, but the housing is quite varied - in fact, I find it a lot more varied than neighborhoods closer in with their uniform brick bungalows.

But I don't get the "soul-sucking" part. I hear that in a lot of people's comments about the suburbs & tract housing. How does the type of housing create a soul-sucking environment? As the previous poster said, Stapleton is just 7 mi from downtown - 11 minutes by car the other day. So commute time could hardly be deemed soul-sucking.

Someone please explain because we're buying in Stapleton & if there is something to that, I'd rather understand it now.
The person writing this obviously has some axe to grind. Stapleton is a great neighborhood where neighbors know one another, we do things together, and it's a great place to raise kids. Lots of parks, the best rec center in Denver, lots of festivals/activities year round, running/walking trails, close to everything in urban Denver, easy access to the airport, the best schools in DPS. It's not perfect... no place is. But it's the best place I've ever lived. If/when we move, it will be within Stapleton.

"Soul sucking"... what does that even mean? Nothing but name calling by a hater.
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:59 AM
 
19 posts, read 35,543 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by boilingblacksea View Post
.

Stapleton was designed by a supposed New Urbanist project. It's 1500 acres of residential pods, a large mall, open space and a small "village" center. But it is on a grid. Gridded sprawl.
This poorly designed project is under constant criticism, and now cited as a place where walking is hazardous --because in the absence of numerous narrow through streets, people end up being exposed to too much fast traffic on the major thoroughfares serving the suburbs.

Denver's old-fashioned neighborhoods, aka Park Hill, Capitol Hill, Wash Park, with a grid and plenty of through streets are considered safer for pedestrians.
I agree that it is the subject of some criticism. In many cases, however, it's because people disagree on what they want or what they want Stapleton to be. Take, for example, your point that Stapleton is "gridded sprawl." Now I'm not entirely sure what that means (I see you just took that quote from a comment from the page you linked to), but on the "sprawl" assertion, Stapleton, while large in size overall, has lot sizes that are intentionally small and houses that are close together, which makes it no more "sprawling" than Park Hill or Wash Park and gives it the potential at build out to be extremely walkable. On the the hand, some people don't like Stapleton precisely because the lot sizes are too small and the houses too close together. You can't possibly please both groups, and so people from both groups complain. Which is why some people find happiness elsewhere.

But at the end of the day, facts, not just opinions, matter. It was the 11th highest top-selling master planned community in the U.S. in 2011, #1 in all of Colorado. Clearly they're doing something right.
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Old 01-27-2012, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,178,507 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoyaSoxa View Post
I agree that it is the subject of some criticism. In many cases, however, it's because people disagree on what they want or what they want Stapleton to be. Take, for example, your point that Stapleton is "gridded sprawl." Now I'm not entirely sure what that means (I see you just took that quote from a comment from the page you linked to), but on the "sprawl" assertion, Stapleton, while large in size overall, has lot sizes that are intentionally small and houses that are close together, which makes it no more "sprawling" than Park Hill or Wash Park and gives it the potential at build out to be extremely walkable. On the the hand, some people don't like Stapleton precisely because the lot sizes are too small and the houses too close together. You can't possibly please both groups, and so people from both groups complain. Which is why some people find happiness elsewhere.

But at the end of the day, facts, not just opinions, matter. It was the 11th highest top-selling master planned community in the U.S. in 2011, #1 in all of Colorado. Clearly they're doing something right.
And is it really "sprawl" when it's in infill project surrounded by older, built up areas? I don't think it could possibly qualify as "sprawl". Would it have been better to leave it as natural, open prairie within the city of Denver?
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